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  • Pragmatics & Discourse Analysis x

A Conceptual History of Chinese -Isms

The Modernization of Ideological Discourse, 1895–1925

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Ivo Spira

In A Conceptual History of Chinese -Isms, Ivo Spira explores the linguistic and rhetorical development of Chinese -isms, as well as the key concept zhǔyì 主義 ('ism') itself. He argues that the introduction of this concept from Japan in the 1890s inaugurated an 'Age of -Isms', in which it served as a conceptual focus for the stereotypical categorization of people and the utopian imagination of the future.
The book focuses on Chinese -isms in the formative period (1895–1925) through a close reading of key primary sources, covering linguistic, conceptual, and rhetorical aspects of their use in ideological reasoning. Spira emphasizes the combination of internal (traditional) and external (Western and Japanese) factors in the emergence of Chinese -isms.

The Questions of Jesus in John

Logic, Rhetoric and Persuasive Discourse

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Douglas Charles Estes

Why do the New Testament gospels depict a Jesus who asks questions almost as often as he gives answers? In The Questions of Jesus in John Douglas Estes crafts a highly interdisciplinary theory of question-asking based on insights from ancient rhetoric and modern erotetics (the study of interrogatives) in order to investigate the logical and rhetorical purposes of Jesus' questions in the Gospel of John. While scholarly discussion about Jesus cares more for what he says, and not what he asks, Estes argues a better understanding of the rhetorical and dialectical roles of questions in ancient narratives sheds a more accurate light on both John’s narrative art and Jesus' message in the Fourth Gospel.

Job the Unfinalizable

A Bakhtinian Reading of Job 1-11

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Seong Whan Timothy Hyun

In Job the Unfinalizable, Seong Whan Timothy Hyun reads Job 1-11 through the lens of Bakhtin’s dialogism and chronotope to hear each different voice as a unique and equally weighted voice. The distinctive voices in the prologue and dialogue, Hyun argues, depict Job as the unfinalizable by working together rather than quarrelling each other. As pieces of a puzzle come together to make the whole picture, all voices in Job 1-11 though each with its own unique ideology come together to complete the picture of Job. This picture of Job offers readers a different way to read the book of Job: to find better questions rather than answers.

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Adrian T. Smith

In The Representation of Speech Events in Chariton's Callirhoe and the Acts of the Apostles, Adrian T. Smith summarizes cross-linguistic research on how and why narrators vary the formulae that introduce direct speech. This research is applied to Chariton and to Acts. The findings demonstrate that narrators vary quotation formulae for numerous pragmatic purposes, including the tracking of conversational dynamics via a set of 'marked' and 'unmarked' quotation devices.

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Laurențiu Moț

Morphological and Syntactical Irregularities in the Book of Revelation by Laurențiu Florentin Moț is an approach to the solecisms of Johannine Apocalypse from a Greek perspective. The work aims at demonstrating that, in accord with Second Language Acquisition studies, Semitic transfer in Revelation is extremely rare. Most of its linguistic peculiarities can be explained within the context of the Greek language. Morphological and Syntactical Irregularities in the Book of Revelation is unique in several ways. First, it deals with the most comprehensive list of solecisms. Second, it treats grammatical irregularities in their own right, looking at their cause, explanation, and contribution to the interpretation of the text. Third, it is interdisciplinary, bringing together textual criticism, Greek linguistics, and NT exegesis.

Paul’s Language of Ζῆλος

Monosemy and the Rhetoric of Identity and Practice

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Benjamin J. Lappenga

In Paul’s Language of Ζῆλος, Benjamin Lappenga harnesses linguistic insights recently formulated within the framework of relevance theory to argue that within the letters of Paul (specifically Galatians, 1-2 Corinthians, and Romans), the ζῆλος word group is monosemic. Linking the responsible treatment of lexemes in the interpretive process with new insight into Paul’s rhetorical and theological task, Lappenga demonstrates that the mental encyclopedia activated by the term ζῆλος is 'shaped' within Paul’s discourse and thus transforms the meaning of ζῆλος for attentive ('model') readers. Such identity-forming strategies promote a series of practices that may be grouped under the rubric of 'rightly-directed ζῆλος'; specifically, emulation of 'weak' people and things, eager pursuit of community-building gifts, and the avoidance of jealous rivalry.

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Edited by Daniel Gutzmann and Hans-Martin Gärtner

Beyond Expressives: Explorations in Use-Conditional Meaning offers empirical and theoretical studies of expressions whose meaning falls outside the standard realm of truth-conditional semantics. Aspects of meaning that are better captured by their use-conditions instead came into the spotlight of formal semantics recently, mainly due to the raised interest in expressions like interjections or swear words. Going beyond such expressives, the contributions provide detailed semantic analyses of a broad range of use-conditional items, including particles, non-inflectional constructions, personal datives and interpretational effects of focus. This volume thereby proves that the empirical domain of use-conditional meaning is as diverse as the truth-conditional one, equally amenable to systematic semantic treatments.

This book is an exciting, eye-opening collection of novel and challenging data from English, German and Japanese. For anyone who needs persuading that there is more to language expressivity than informational content, this book is a must. For those who need no persuading, this book will be no less a treat. It offers to all not merely sets of entrancing new observations, but also analyses which feed one’s imagination as to how best to extend current methodologies to make these data tractable for formal modelling. Ruth Kempson, King’s College

Evidentials in Ryukyuan: the Shuri Variety of Luchuan

A Typological and Theoretical Study of Grammatical Evidentiality

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Tomoko Arakaki

Evidentiality, the linguistic category which marks the source of the speaker’s information, has often been overlooked in studies of Luchuan (Ryukyuan), the only sister language of Japanese. In this book, Arakaki provides the first comprehensive analysis of Luchuan evidentials. She proposes that Luchuan has a grammatical evidential system which contains one Direct evidential and three indirect evidentials (Inference, Assumed, and Reportative). The discussion includes cross-linguistic issues such as how evidentiality is related to epistemic modality, with the intention that this work should constitute a contribution to the typological and theoretical study of evidentiality. This work will open new horizons for the study of evidentiality.

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Mee-Jeong Park

This book marks the first attempt to rationalise the meaning of Korean intonation, especially its boundary tones. Unlike other languages where various pragmatic and discourse meanings are delivered through the types of pitch accent (prominent pitch movement on stressed syllable) and the types of phrase-final boundary tones, Korean delivers the pragmatic/discourse meaning mainly by the types of phrase-final boundary tones. This is possible because Korean has at least nine boundary tones while other languages have two (or, even four or five if the boundary tone of a smaller phrase are included). Various examples are given that illustrate this three-way relationship, i.e., a specific meaning delivered by a certain type of boundary tone and a certain type of morphological marker in natural conversation.