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  • Professional Development x

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Edward Podsiadlik III

This qualitative journey explores how literature informs and challenges my understanding of teaching and learning. Insights, questions, and conflicts are revealed through a series of essays in which my evolving teacher identity is illuminated through literature and imagination. Hopefully reading this portrayal of literature, which has been a source of educational insight and imagination for me, will be of use to other educators as they reflect on their own teaching.
The primary works of literature used to facilitate this journey are: The Red Badge of Courage (1895), Les Miserables (1862), and American Idiot (2004); Light in August (1932), Seinfeld scripts (1991-98), and Frankenstein (1818); and The Odyssey, Night (1960), and The Souls of Black Folk (1903). By delving beneath my exterior ‘teacher mask,’ a collage of images, anecdotes, reflections, aspirations, and fears is exposed.
As a resource for pre-service teachers or a reflective exercise for veteran teachers, this study aims to benefit educators by providing a new pathway through which to better understand their intrinsic identities as teachers. Each chapter concludes with “Recommendations for Reflection” that readers are encouraged to consider individually and/or collectively.
The spirit of daydreams allows me to integrate literature, autobiography, and imagination through inventive and inspired discourses with literary figures, using authentic quotations as content for original commentaries that further examine the intrinsic nature of teacher identity. My hope is that this journey will inspire other educators to further reflect on realities and possibilities of what it means to be a teacher.

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Edited by Susanne Weber, Fritz K. Oser, Frank Achtenhagen, Michael Fretschner and Sandra Trost

This book provides new insights into the important field of Entrepreneurship Education. The editors pick up Fayolle’s invitation: “How can we learn from ‘institutional’ culture?” and translate it to a variety of aspects of learning to start-up. From the perspective of Human Resource Education and Management (Wirtschaftspädagogik) the authors shed light into the socio-cultural system of entrepreneurship education. They start with mapping out its challenges. They discuss context factors like political regimes affecting entrepreneurial activities, consider goals including moral awareness, introduce ideas of modeling entre- and intrapreneurial competencies, suggest teaching-learning-strategies, discuss evaluation procedures and introduce case studies of entrepreneurship education in different countries for different study levels. All in all this book stimulates and supports the challenges of educators, students, and practitioners (human resource managers, consultants, principals, teachers, and trainers) to introduce into the varying contexts of entrepreneurship education content specific, procedural, causal elements necessary for starting and maintaining an enterprise.

Beginning Teachers

Reviewing Disastrous Lessons

Edited by Michael Crowhurst

In this collection of narratives, beginning teachers describe and reflect on critical incidents—classes that didn't quite go to plan. These experiences are recalled in a general way and all names and locations are fictionalized. Each narrative, while situated in a classroom, focuses on the experience of the teacher/author and sheds light on their thinking as they work through the complex event they are remembering. Beginning teachers then imagine how they might approach a similar situation in the future. While developing reflective practice techniques can support and enhance individual practice when these accounts are shared with others there is some scope for enhancing educative experiences generally. There is a long tradition of reflective practice writing in education, and this small workbook aims to make a contribution to this genre. Each reflective practitioner narrative is followed with an invitation to discussion section and periodically through the workbook sideline methodologies are introduced that readers can use to support further analysis. The beginning teacher narratives are authentic, complex and alive and as a consequence they will generate lively discussion in tutorial spaces with beginning teachers. The materials are informed by various strands of poststructural and critical theory and therefore they are intended to reflect a dialogic stance—rather than signpost specific directions.
Cover image: ‘Three legged chair—an accident waiting to happen’, by Crowhurst (2012)

Bridging between Research and Practice

Supporting Professional Development through Collaborative Studies of Classroom Teaching with Technology

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Sara Hennessy

This book presents a fresh approach to bridging the perceived gap between academic and classroom cultures. It describes a unique form of research partnership whereby Cambridge University academics and school teachers together grappled with and reformulated theory—through in-depth case studies analysing practice using interactive whiteboards in five subject areas. The inquiry exploited the collaborators’ complementary professional knowledge bases. Teachers’ voices are particularly audible in co-authored case study chapters. Outcomes included deeper insights into concepts of sociocultural learning theory and classroom dialogue, more analytical mindsets, sustained new practices and ways of working collegially.
The book reflects upon the power of lesson video review and details how the co-inquirers negotiated “ intermediate theory”—bridging educational theory and specific settings—framed in mutually accessible language and embodied in interactive multimedia resources for teacher development. These include video clips, analytic commentary from multiple perspectives, lesson materials, plus optional prompts for reflection and critique—not models of “best practice”. The resources make pedagogy explicit and vividly illustrate the book’s ideas, offering theory-informed yet practical tools designed with and for practitioners. Hennessy and colleagues have tested a model of ongoing, teacher-led development and innovation, professional dialogue and classroom trialing stimulated by discussing selected multimedia resources.

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Len Cairns and John Stephenson

Capable Workplace Learning is about Capable people, Capable Organisations and an underlying belief in the applicability of the concept of Capability to Work, Place and Learning.
In this book, Cairns and Stephenson present a case for the development of human Capability, in life, in work, and in the lifespace. They trace the development of the Capability concept arguing that it embraces and goes beyond competence. They draw on over 35 years of experience of direct involvement in enhancing adult Capability through education at all levels.
Capability, they also argue, applies as much to organisations and working practices as it does to the individuals involved and call for synergy between organisational and personal capability. Further, the book presents a case that learning through work, whereby people utilise their work experiences and activities as the opportunity, process, place and content of what they are learning whilst they are “working” has, they suggest, established itself as a creditable way of looking at the knowledge development we all encounter and engage with whilst working.
The authors explore a range of examples of Capable practice in business and higher education and present a number of portraits of individuals whose lifework, personifies the Capability at work concept. In addition, they suggest, governments should go beyond the rather narrow aspiration of raising skills levels, to encouraging more people to experience formulating and solving the problem of their own development.

Career Assessment

Qualitative Approaches

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Edited by Mary McMahon and Mark Watson

Career Assessment: Qualitative Approaches will assume a seminal place in the field of career development as the first book to focus solely on qualitative approaches to career assessment. This book represents a timely and important contribution to career development as it seeks to meet the needs of increasingly diverse client groups.
Part 1, Foundations strongly positions qualitative career assessment in its historical, philosophical, theoretical and research contexts. The book is innovative by considering qualitative career assessment through the lens of learning.
Part 2, Instruments, presents the first collation of chapters on a comprehensive range of qualitative career assessment instruments and processes written to a standard format to enable readers to compare, contrast and evaluate approaches.
Part 3, Using quantitative career assessment qualitatively, mitigates against depicting an unnecessary divide in the field between quantitative and qualitative career assessment by considering their complementarities.
Part 4, Diverse Contexts, considers qualitative approaches to career assessment in contexts other than able western, middle class settings.
Part 5, Future Directions, reflects on the chapters and poses suggestions for the future. With high profile authors from nine different countries, the book represents a truly international contribution to the field of career development. In its focus on qualitative career assessment, this book holds a unique position as the only such text and will therefore assume an important place in the libraries of researchers, academics, and career practitioners.

Career Development and Systems Theory

Connecting Theory and Practice. 3rd Edition

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Wendy Patton and Mary McMahon

The 3rd edition of this classic book offers practitioners, researchers and students a comprehensive introduction to, and overview of, career theory; introduces the Systems Theory Framework of career development; and demonstrates its considerable contemporary and innovative application to practice.
A number of authors have identified the framework as one of a small number of significant innovations in the career development literature. The Systems Theory Framework of career development was developed to provide coherence to the career development field by providing a comprehensive conceptualisation of the many existing theories and concepts relevant to understanding career development. It is not designed to be a theory of career development; rather systems theory is introduced as the basis for an overarching, or metatheoretical, framework within which all concepts of career development, described in the plethora of career theories, can be usefully positioned and utilised in both theory and practice. It has been applied to the career development of children, adolescents and women.
Since its first publication, the Systems Theory Framework has been the basis of numerous publications focusing on theoretical application and integration, practice and research, with a growing number of these by authors other than the framework developers. Its application across cultures also has been emphasised. The theoretical and practical unity of the Systems Theory Framework makes this book a worthy addition to the professional libraries of practitioners, researchers and students, new to, or experienced in, the field of career development.

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Edited by Vladimir B. Skorikov and Wendy Patton

In the past few years, many career theorists have noted the dearth of literature in the area of career development in childhood and adolescence. A growing need for integrating theory and research on the early stages of vocational development within a systemic, life-span developmental approach has been articulated. This volume, the first book dedicated to career development of children and adolescents, provides a broad and comprehensive overview of the current knowledge about the key career processes that take place in this age group. Each of the eighteen chapters represents an in-depth examination of a specific aspect of career development with a focus on integrating modern career theory and ongoing research and further developing theory-practice connections in understanding child and adolescent career behaviour. Twenty-six authors, leading experts from eight countries, provide a state-of-the-art summary of the current thinking in the field and outline directions for future empirical work and practice.

Career Guidance and Livelihood Planning across the Mediterranean

Challenging Transitions in South Europe and the MENA Region

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Edited by Ronald G. Sultana

Perhaps no other challenge preoccupies governments and citizens in the Mediterranean region than the mass unemployment of young people, many of who have invested in higher education in the hope that ability and effort lead to fulfilling lives. Transitions to independent adulthood are, however, frustratingly long drawn-out, and often jeopardised by labour markets that are neither youth-friendly nor meritocratic. While such challenges require structural responses at the macro-economic level, career education and guidance have an important role to play in addressing both the public and private good, and in furthering the social justice agenda. This volume provides a state-of-the-art review of career education and guidance in Southern Europe and the Middle East and North Africa Region, presenting a multi-faceted portrayal of the situation in each country as well as overviews of cross-cutting themes that are especially relevant to context, such as women’s career development in the Arab states, job placement support for refugees, and the impact of faith on livelihood planning.

Career Moves

Mentoring for Women Advancing Their Career and Leadership in Academia

Edited by Athena Vongalis-Macrow

Mentoring and career guidance are the missing ingredients in women’s career planning at the higher education level. This book recognizes and gives voice to some of the common career concerns of women in higher education and responds to these through well informed, researched and experiential chapters focussing on interests specific to women in academia.
Career Moves is an international collection of book chapters that explore a range of specific issues that all women in higher education face or will face as they move up the career ladder. The book follows a career trajectory from new academics, middle academics and senior academics, in order to provide specific mentoring advice thatwill be useful, practical and essential for all women contemplating a career in higher education.

The book draws on the substantial knowledge, experience and information of successful women currently working in higher education. Each chapter presents strategic information for academics working in higher education who may be seeking insider’s advice about negotiating their careers. The authors, as ‘mentors’, reflect, discuss and offer critical learning to the readers. The aim is to help guide and shape women’s career moves in higher education.
In this international edition authors have given personal accounts of what works and how women could prepare for the next stages of their academic careers. Authors have given sociological accounts of obstacles and how these can impede women if they are not aware of strategies to overcome barriers. Insights about successful mentoring programs are highlighted to provide possible models for organizations.