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Action Learning and Action Research

Songlines through Interviews

Ortrun Zuber-Skerritt

Auto/Biography and Auto/Ethnography

Praxis of Research Method

Series:

Wolff-Michael Roth

In a number of academic disciplines, auto/biography and auto/ethnography have become central means of critiquing of the ways in which research represents individuals and their cultures. Auto/biography and auto/ethnography are genres that blend ethnographic interests with life writing and they tell about a culture at the same time they tell about an individual life. This book presents educational researchers, in exemplary form, the possibilities and constraints of both auto/biography and auto/ethnography as methods of doing educational research. The contributors to this volume explore, by means of examples, auto/biography and auto/ethnography as means for critical analysis and as tool kit for the different stakeholders in education. The four thematic sections deal with: a. different possible uses and constraints of the two methods b. understanding teaching and teaching to learn c. institutional critiques d. experiences and trajectories as evidence of a sociology of everyday life. The book was written to be used by upper undergraduate and graduate students taking courses in research design; because of its practical approach, it is highly suitable for those contexts where research methods courses do not exist. The audience also includes professors, who want to have a reference on design and methodology, and those who have not yet had the opportunity to employ a particular method.

Edited by Stephanie Springgay, Rita L. Irwin, Carl Leggo and Peter Gouzouasis

Being with A/r/tography is a collection of essays that explain and exemplify the arts-based research methodology called a/r/tography. Edited by four scholars who are artists, researchers, and teachers (a/r/tographers), this book is a methodology book for practitioners in arts-based educational research. In addition to an introductory essay which contextualizes and theorizes the methodological framework of a/r/tography, the book is divided into three main thematic sections that are integral to a/r/tographical research: (1) self-study and autobiography; (2) communities of a/r/tographic practice; (3) ethics and activism. The book concludes with a consideration of issues related to assessment, validity, and interpretation.
Being with A/r/tography will be an excellent core text in graduate courses that focus on arts-based educational research, as well as a valuable text in pre-service teacher education programs. The book will also be significant for qualitative research courses in all the social sciences and the health sciences, including communication studies, nursing, counseling psychology, and arts therapy. The book provides a clear and comprehensive introduction to a/r/tography. Even though a/r/tography as a research methodology is relatively new in the scholarly field, Being with A/r/tography spells out how scholarly practitioners who are artists and researchers and teachers have been pursuing this kind of research for a long time.

Climbing the Ladder with Gabriel

Poetic Inquiry of a Methamphetamine Addict in Recovery

Pauline Sameshima, Roxanne Vandermause and Stephen Chalmers

"Climbing the Ladder with Gabriel demonstrates the power of photography and poetry to render the experience of methamphetamine addiction and recovery through the art of an interdisciplinary research methodology. Instructors, students, recovering addicts, and prevention/recovery advocates will find this a valuable resource. There are many ways to “know the world”. The authors of this remarkable text have adopted an eclectic mix of methodologies from the arts and sciences to portray the experience of methamphetamine addiction. While it may never be possible to fully “know” another’s experience, this book provides readers with one of the most intimate portraits of a methamphetamine addict ever assembled. The reader will be touched by the juxtaposition of everyday joy and the hopelessness and regret so poignantly portrayed by these authors. The book is also hopeful, documenting that, even in the throes of terrible addiction, unique humanness survives and recovery is always possible. "
John M. Roll, Professor and Associate Dean, College of Nursing. Director, Program of Excellence in the Addictions, Washington State University.
"The authors of this remarkable work have opened the door for new ways of compiling and revealing what it means to be a human being caught in the dangerously perplexing problem of drug addiction and its fallout in a wide circle of social problems. By summoning up both a rigorous philosophy and procedural logic as a baseline and an artfulness that gives the bare bones of hard data a very human face, a heartbeat, and a voice that everyone can hear, they make a compelling case for such work in arts-based research and for pluralism in social science research design and methods. This is art caught in a handshake with science that matters. "
Ivan Brady, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus, Anthropology, State University of New York, Oswego.
"What a fantastic idea! What a great accomplishment!"
Laurel Richardson, Professor Emeritus of Sociology and international leader in qualitative research, The Ohio State University.
"This poetic inquiry performs a vibrant testimony to the possibilities of personal and political transformation that can emerge in research that is heartful and artful. When we collaborate creatively and lovingly, we can find the ways of bountiful hope for living together with health. "
Carl Leggo, Professor and Poet, Language and Literacy, University of British Columbia, Canada.

The Collaborative Turn

Working Together in Qualitative Research

Edited by Walter S. Gershon

"Pulling back the curtain on the collaborative process, Walter Gershon’s stunning new collection highlights the complex, multi-dimensional nature of qualitative research today. The Collaborative Turn: Working Together in Qualitative Research powerfully deepens and richens ongoing discussions around collaborative inquiry so central today. Drawing together a wide range of senior and emergent scholars, as well as a span of traditional and experimental approaches, this cutting-edge text is ideal for both new and seasoned scholars alike. -- Greg Dimitriadis, Professor, University at Buffalo, SUNY Gershon's edited volume on emerging collaborative methodological practices is a welcome resource for qualitative researchers who want to make their research more transparent, improvisational, and reflexive. It juxtaposes the latest reflections of innovators like Lather, Smithies, and Clandinin with new forms of collaboration in the arts and PAR. This interdisciplinary approach provides much food for thought that will surely inspire even bolder methodological experimentation. -- Douglas Foley, Professor of Cultural Studies in Education and of Anthropology, The University of Texas-Austin This book presents invaluable (and rarely seen) reflections on collaboration, which is a central practice for qualitative researchers, across disciplines. The authors examine their relationships and experiences with other researchers and with participants, resulting in an engaging text that explores the methodological and ethical implications of generating meaning in collaborative interactions. The end result is a ‘must-read’ text that educates and enlightens about the joys and challenges of collaborative research. -- Lisa M. Given, Director, International Institute for Qualitative Methodology, University of Alberta It is evident that qualitative research must be a social activity. But like so much in social life, it is taken for granted in the everyday practice of this methodology. This book lays bare the collaboration that is often unspoken on our work. Authors in Walter Gershon’s The Collaborative Turn push at current methodological boundaries enabling us to see the social practice of qualitative research in novel, creative, and artistic ways. -- George W. Noblit, Joseph R. Neikirk Distinguished Professor of Sociology of Education, UNC-Chapel Hill"

Demystifying Research

A Primer for Novice Researchers

George R. Taylor and Cynthia L. Jackson

The Primer is a practical resource for education and social science beginner researchers who can be tentative about how to begin their research projects and find the detailed research books overwhelming, initially. Central to the Primer is a process, developed by Jackson, to guide beginner researchers in conceptualizing and framing a research project. The process, information, examples and exercises were field tested with over 100 doctoral students in dissertation proposal development courses. The contents have proven successful in meeting beginners’ initial needs.
Written in nontechnical language, readers are guided incrementally through the complexities of focusing a research study, and how to address the initial problems they can encounter when embarking on the research journey. Part I provides preliminary considerations about research and being a researcher. Part II describes ways of thinking about conceptualizing and framing a research study. Part III contains a comparative overview of the quantitative and qualitative research approaches, and highlights some of the research methods associated with each. Part IV assists novice researchers in becoming familiar with data sources for research, contents of a research proposal and a research report, and answers procedural questions that are frequently asked.
Cover picture: Samuel Joseph, St. Croix, Virgin Islands.

Doing Qualitative Research

Praxis of Method

Series:

Wolff-Michael Roth

The author takes readers on a journey of a large number of issues in designing actual studies of knowing and learning in the classroom, exploring actual data, and putting readers face to face with problems that he actually or possibly encountered, and what he has done or possibly could have done. The reader subsequently sees the results of data collection in the different analyses provided. The author shows how one writes very different studies using the same data sources but very different theoretical assumptions and analytic technique.
The author brings his publication experience in very different disciplinesinto play to provide readers with way of experiencing research as praxis. The book is organized around six major themes (sections), in the course of which it develops the practical problems an educational researcher might face in a large variety of settings. The book was written to be used by upper undergraduate and graduate students taking courses in research design and professors who want to have a reference on design and methodology.

Doing Teacher-Research

A Handbook for Perplexed Practioners

Series:

Wolff-Michael Roth

There are many teachers who think about doing research in their own classes and schools but who are perplexed by what appears to be involved. This book is intended for these perplexed practitioners, to provide them with an easily understandable narrative about the concrete praxis of doing research in their classrooms or in those of their teacher peers teaching next door or in the same school. The fundamental idea underlying this book is to provide an easily accessible but nevertheless intellectually honest text that allows teachers to increase their agency with respect to better understanding their praxis and the events in their classrooms by means of research.
The author draws on his experience of doing teacher-research while being a high school teacher and department head. Roth uses six concrete research studies that he has conducted alone or with peers to describe the salient parts of any teacher-researcher investigation including: what topic to study; issues of ethics and permissions from students, school, and parents; how and what sources to collect; how to structure resources; how to construct data from the materials; how to derive claims; and how to write a report/research study. Roth chose the case-based approach because cases provide the details necessary for understanding why and how he, as teacher-researcher, has made certain decisions, and what he would do differently today. Using this case-based approach, he allows readers to tie methods choices to situations that they likely are familiar with.

Education Science

Critical Perspectives

Series:

Edited by Ralf St. Clair

Educational research is not what it was fifteen years ago. In this discipline the changes have been dramatic, far-reaching and rapid. Out of the criticisms of the 1990s and the calls for greater accountability of the early 2000s one idea has come to the fore—education science. There are two main components to education science. The first is the principle that research in education must model itself more closely on disciplines seen as highly credible and successful, mainly the natural sciences and medicine. The second part is that educators must build their practice upon the insights developed through this scientific research process. Overall, education science has the potential to change how we think about education, how we build knowledge about it, and how we know when it is successful.
This volume brings together some of the most active proponents of education science and some of the most committed critics. Within it the idea of education science is explored in depth, randomized controlled trials (considered the “gold standard” of education science) are discussed in detail, and the philosophical difficulties of knowledge in education are explored. Established thinkers are brought alongside newly emerging analysts, and detailed accounts of the institutions driving education science are included. Each contribution is thoughtful and balanced, engaging with the issues of the field and how they might be addressed. As a body of work, this collection of essays provides a well-rounded, critical discussion of the potential—and the problems—of the education science movement.

Educational Research by Association

AARE presidential addresses and the field of educational research

Trevor Gale and Bob Lingard

Educational Research by Association is an archive of an archive. It is a collection of eleven Presidential Addresses delivered over the last 40 years to the annual conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) and published annually in AARE’s academic journal, the Australian Educational Researcher (AER). However, it is more than an archive in that the selection and the opening essay seek to plot, evaluate and contribute to definitions of education research and its functions and purposes in a changing world, and to consider its impact, broadly defined, in both actual and desirable or normative terms. In pursuing this agenda, the book highlights a number of key issues that have become important in educational research over time, particularly in Australia but also around the globe. These include defining education research as a field, including AARE’s location within that field and the positioning of the presidents’ Addresses therein. They also include questions about the purposes of education research, which implies as well the issue of the readership for such research. The selection also touches on matters of dissemination, publication and diffusion and impact more broadly, raising matters of publication and the various and competing outlets for publication of education research, nationally and increasingly on an international scale. Issues of quality, including associated politics, also come into play, as do questions of the relationship of education research to education policy and practice. These latter questions have become more significant in state policies framed by a new public management that call for evidence-based policy. The opening essay by Bob Lingard and Trevor Gale, two former AARE Presidents, traverses these matters generally and in respect of this archive of Presidential Addresses, helping to define educational research in an increasingly globalised world.