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Bilateral Relations, China, the United States, and the South Pacific
Australia-Taiwan relations defy easy categorisation. Business and trade links are robust. Both countries support the US-led East Asian order and democracy. Yet, omnipresent pressure from China ensures relations are hard edged and mutually exasperating. In Australia and Taiwan, Joel Atkinson untangles and explains this important Asia-Pacific relationship. He covers history through to the end of the Cold War, the role of Taiwan in Australia’s contemporary relations with China and the US, and bilateral issues such as ministerial visits and friction in the South Pacific.
Atkinson breaks new ground with this comprehensive analysis of Australia-Taiwan relations. He draws on numerous interviews conducted in Australia, Taiwan and the South Pacific, archives, newspapers, governmental publications, leaked US diplomatic cables, and Chinese sources.
Balance, Imbalance and Rebalance
Editor: SHAO Binhong
What is China's rightful place on the world stage? Will the world remain unipolar as signs of American decline appear to be mounting? How can China maintain a harmonious relationship with its neighbors? What does China intend to do with the new power and influence that appears to be at its disposal? In light of emergent post-2008 economic realities, how should China adjust its foreign economic relations? This volume, the first of its kind, gathers a collection of translations of influential essays, talks, and papers on Chinese foreign policy, national security, and foreign economic relations written by Chinese elites. Many papers have also served as propositions for policy prescriptions to China's leaders, the vast majority of which have to date only been available in Chinese.
Chinese Foreign Policy Elites Discuss Emerging Trends in International Politics
Editor: SHAO Binhong
Where do we see China’s changes? What are the guiding principles behind these changes? Are China’s diplomatic policies and international strategies more reflective of its own national conditions or international trends? How will China balance its ideology with national interests? How does China see the current international order and its new position within the existing order? Besides answering these basic questions, this volume considers two other important issues: First, the future of China after its era of continuous high-speed growth; and second, (the all-important question in China’s foreign affairs) the future of Sino-US relations?

2013 was China’s first year under new leadership, and there is a consensus amongst researchers of China’s international affairs that the diplomatic practices China undertook to a great extent demonstrated new characteristics, perspectives, and requirements of the new leadership.
Its Economic Challenges and Foreign Policy Initiatives
Editor: SHAO Binhong
“How will China develop under Xi Jinping’s rule? Is Xi Jinping, and by extension the Chinese state, now acting from a position of strength or weakness? In other words, do his policies appear to be the actions of a strong leader of an increasingly powerful nation? Or, are they the actions of an insecure one, uncertain of how legitimate the state is in the eyes of the population over which it rules? As with each of the preceding volumes in this series, this book is so valuable because it provides English language translations of the most prominent recent writings on these issues by China’s leading scholars in the fields of international relations and political economy. This volume is an invaluable resource to all those looking to gain a deeper and more nuanced understanding of where China is headed during the Xi Jinping era.” – Allen Carlson, Cornell University
Mutual Perceptions and Images in Japanese-German Relations, 1860–2010 examines the mutual images formed between Japan and Germany from the mid-nineteenth to twenty-first centuries, and the influence of these images on the development of bilateral relations. Unlike earlier research on Japanese-German relations, which focused on the similarity of these countries’ historical trajectories, this publication presents a more nuanced picture. It relativizes perceptions of a special “spiritual relationship” between Japan and Germany as well as their commonalities of “national character” through an exploration of previously untapped historical visual and textual sources. With essays by sixteen leading scholars in the field, this collection is an invaluable contribution to the historiography of modern Japan and Germany, and to the field of international relations.
Contributors are: Hans-Joachim Bieber, Fukuoka Mariko, Hakoishi Hiroshi, Iwasa Takurō, Katō Yōko, Kawakita Atsuko, Gerhard Krebs, Kudō Akira, Heinrich Menkhaus, Danny Orbach, Peter Pantzer, Sven Saaler, Satō Takumi, Volker Stanzel, Suzuki Naoko, Tajima Nobuo, Tano Daisuke, and Rolf-Harald Wippich.
In The Cold War and the Origin of Diplomacy of People’s Republic of China, Niu Jun offers a new analytical framework for understanding the Cold War and PRC’s diplomacy from 1949 to 1955. He sees it as an interactive historical process between the Cold War, China’s domestic transition from revolution to nation-building, and the revolutionary ideology in the minds of Chinese leaders and Chinese people.

Niu Jun’s analytical framework sheds fresh light on the widely studied events of PRC’s diplomacy such as China’s alliance with the Soviet Union and confrontation with the U.S., military actions on the Korean Peninsula and in Indochina, settlement of the first Taiwan Strait crisis, development of nuclear weapons, and so on.
The Modern Remaking of Dutch-Chinese Relations, 1927–1950
In this meticulously researched volume, Vincent Chang resurrects a near forgotten yet pivotal chapter of Dutch-Chinese ties to narrate how World War II, the civil war in China, and Indonesia’s decolonization redefined and remade this age-old bilateral relationship.
Drawing on a unique range of hitherto unexplored archives, the book explains how China’s nascent rise on the global scene and the Netherlands’ simultaneous decline as a colonial power shaped events in Dutch-controlled Indonesia (and vice versa) and prompted a recalibration of their mutual ties, culminating in the Netherlands’ recognition of the People’s Republic and laying the foundations for Dutch and Chinese policies through to the present.
Offering insightful analyses of power dynamics and international law at the close of empire, this book is a critical resource for historians and China specialists as well as scholars of international relations.
Global Governance, Conflict and China sheds a unique perspective on China’s normative behaviour in the realm of collective security, peacekeeping, arms control, the war on terror and post-conflict justice. This analysis engages with an Asian epistemological framework whose relational thought borrows from the context – space and time alike – that informs China’s principle-driven conduct on the international plane. Through the lens of relational governance, this work develops a new theory on the relational normativity of international law (TORNIL) that identifies the interdependent sources that underpin China’s international legal argument, i.e. norms, values and relationships. Without a fertile soil in which those conflicting relationships between share- and stakeholders can be rebuilt, international laws governing (post-conflict) violence cannot restore and maintain peace, humanity and accountability.
Reflections from Southeast Asia and Africa
This book provides a detailed examination of how norms concerning human rights, civilian protection and prevention of mass atrocities have fared in the regions of Southeast Asia and Africa. Originated as a spin off of the journal GR2P (vol. 8/2-3, 2016), it has been enriched with new chapters and revised contents, which contrast the different experiences of those regions and investigates the expression of human protection norms in regional organisations and thematic policy agendas as well as the role of civil society mechanisms/processes. Hunt and Morada have brought together scholar-practitioners from across the world.The collection identifies a range of insights that provide rich opportunities for south-south exchange and mutual learning when it comes to promoting and building capacity for human protection at the regional level.
In China's Public Diplomacy, author Ingrid d'Hooghe contributes to our understanding of what constitutes and shapes a country's public diplomacy, and what factors undermine or contribute to its success.

China invests heavily in policies aimed at improving its image, guarding itself against international criticism and advancing its domestic and international agenda. This volume explores how the Chinese government seeks to develop a distinct Chinese approach to public diplomacy, one that suits the country's culture and authoritarian system. Based on in-depth case studies, it provides a thorough analysis of this approach, which is characterized by a long-term vision, a dominant role for the government, an inseparable and complementary domestic dimension, and a high level of interconnectedness with China's overall foreign policy and diplomacy.