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Copulae in the Arabic Noun Phrase

A Unified Analysis of Arabic Adnominal Markers

Series:

Francesco Grande

Morphemes combined with the Arabic noun are clearly described in the literature, but their interpretation can be somewhat nebulous, and a unified scholarly analysis does not as yet exist. This book proposes a new and unified perspective regarding these morphemes, analyzing them as copulae, and the constructions in which they occur as instances of predication.
Analyzing morphemes combined with the Arabic noun as copulae explains many of their puzzling properties (rise and loss of declension, proteiform nature of nunation, etc.). Emphasis is placed on data previously marginalized in the description of these morphemes, from pre-Classical Arabic transmitted by Arab Grammarians, Semitic languages that contributed to the emergence of Arabic through language contact, and roughly 30 languages genetically unrelated to Arabic.

Morphology and Syntax of Old Hindī

Edition and Analysis of One Hundred Kabīr vānī Poems from Rājasthān

Series:

Jaroslav Strnad

With Morphology and Syntax of Old Hindī scholars and students of medieval Hindī literature acquire an essential tool for learning one of its important but difficult dialects, the so called sadhukkarī bhāshā. Based on an early Rājasthānī manuscript, the volume includes a commented edition of one hundred poems attributed to medieval mystic and thinker Kabīr, followed by a detailed treatment of morphological structure and main syntactic features of the language. The exposition is accompanied by numerous textual examples and index of all lexical and grammatical morphs.
The book can be used as a descriptive grammar of the dialect in question, an aid to the study of historical development of New Indo-Aryan languages, and a reader for use in university courses.

Dynamics of Morphological Productivity

The Evolution of Noun Classes from Latin to Italian

Series:

Francesco Gardani

In Dynamics of Morphological Productivity, Francesco Gardani explores the evolution of the productivity of the noun inflectional classes of Latin and Old Italian, covering a span of almost 2,000 years – an absolute novelty for the theory of diachrony and for Latin and Italo-Romance linguistics. By providing an original set of criteria for measuring productivity, based on the investigation of loanword integration, conversions, and class shift, Gardani provides a substantial contribution to the theory of inflection, as well as to the study of the morphological integration of loanwords. The result is a wealth of empirical facts, including data from the contact languages Etruscan, Ancient Greek, Germanic, Arabic, Byzantine Greek, Old French and Provençal, accompanied by brilliant and groundbreaking analyses.

The Tocharian Subjunctive

A Study in Syntax and Verbal Stem Formation

Series:

Michaël Peyrot

As one of the most central categories of the Tocharian verb, the subjunctive is of utmost importance for the reconstruction of the verbal system, the most rewarding domain of Tocharian historical grammar. Michaël Peyrot provides a thorough analysis of the formation of the subjunctive in both Tocharian languages, and establishes its meaning on the basis of a systematic investigation of a wealth of published and unpublished texts. A careful reconstruction of the Proto-Tocharian stage provides a solid base for the comparison with Indo-European and the derivation of the Tocharian subjunctive from the proto-language. With its focus on the wide variety of intricate morphological patterns, The Tocharian Subjunctive is at the same time a study of the whole Tocharian verbal system.

Series:

Götz Keydana

Infinitive im R̥gveda is an in-depth study of infinitives in Early Vedic, the language of the R̥gveda. Infinitives in Vedic have been studied from various perspectives. This book, however, is the first to give a detailed account of the full range of the attested morphological, syntactic, and semantic types. Based on insights from formal semantics and syntactic theory, the author gives explicit analyses for each type, paying special attention to the grammatical functions involved and to the control relations which govern the reference of subjects in infinitive phrases. On a more general level, the book provides a framework for historical syntax and heuristics for studying syntactic categories in ancient languages.

Infinitive im R̥gveda wirft einen frischen Blick auf die umstrittene Kategorie Infinitiv im frühen Vedisch, der Sprache des R̥gveda. Unter Berücksichtigung von Methoden und Erkenntnissen der Syntaxtheorie und der formalen Semantik wird die gesamte Bandbreite der belegten morphologischen Kodierungen, der syntaktischen Verwendungen und ihrer Semantik herausgearbeitet und ausführlich dokumentiert.

Series:

Josh Holden

In Benasní – I Remember: Dene Sųłiné Oral Histories with Morphological Analysis, Josh Holden presents twelve autobiographical narratives about cultural change from Dene Sųłiné elders in an Aboriginal community in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. In ten interviews and two monologues, the speakers recount their 20th century: the rhythms of traditional life, the catastrophe of epidemics and language loss, the dizzying technological changes, their ambivalence over the past and their anxieties for the future. Accompanying the original Dene texts and free translation is an analytical interlinear gloss applying rigorous morphological and semantic principles to the parsing and glossing of words. The innovative interlinearization distinguishes grammar from visible etymologies. The volume contains a morphological sketch to illuminate grammatical issues in the interlinearization.

Understanding Participant-Reference Shifts in the Book of Jeremiah

A Study of Exegetical Method and its Consequences for the Interpretation of Referential Incoherence

Series:

Oliver Glanz

In prophetic and poetic literature of the Old Testament references to textual participants are inconsistent with regard to their gender, number and person characteristics. Oliver Glanz for the first time provides a systematic study of the phenomenon of participant-reference shifts. The study is restricted to the book of Jeremiah and reflects upon the methodological conditions that should guide the analysis of participant-reference shifts.
Focusing on computer assisted pattern recognition the research suggests that Jeremiah's participant-reference shifts should not be understood from a diachronic perspective. Understanding the origin and function of participant-reference shifts rather from the perspective of syntax, text grammar and rhetorics proves to be more consistent with the textual evidence. With this insight participant-reference shifts no longer have to distort textual coherence.

Series:

Arik Sadan

In The Subjunctive Mood in Arabic Grammatical Thought Arik Sadan outlines the grammatical theories on the naṣb (subjunctive mood) in Classical Arabic. Examining over 160 treatises written by 85 grammarians, lexicographers and Qurʾān commentators, the author defines and characterizes the opinions of medieval Arab grammarians concerning this mood in the verbal system of Classical Arabic. Special attention is given to the prominent early grammarians Sībawayhi (d. ca. 180/796) and al-Farrāʾ (d. 207/822), who represent the Schools of al-Baṣra and al-Kūfa respectively.
The analysis of the grammarians’ views enables the author to draw several important conclusions and hypotheses on the syntactic environments of the subjunctive mood, the dialectal differences relating to its employment and the historical changes and developments it underwent.

Deriving Nominals

A Syntactic Account of Malagasy Nominalizations

Series:

Dimitrios Ntelitheos

This book provides a detailed study of nominalizing patterns in Malagasy (Austronesian) and discusses the broader theoretical issues that arise from these patterns. It explores new and original fieldwork data drawn from the largely unexplored domain of Malagasy deverbal nominals. Offering new insights to long-standing puzzles in the derivation of argument-structure, referential, and clausal nominals, the book promotes a single structure-building mechanism, which allows nominalizers to attach at different heights in the clausal spine to derive nominals with different morphosyntactic properties. In addition, it provides a novel analysis of participant nominalizations, showing that they are derived through the same mechanism that derives relative clauses, and thus setting the stage for new and exciting research directions.

Series:

Edited by Johanson Lars and Martine Robbeets

Genealogical linguistics and areal linguistics are rarely treated from an integrated perspective even if they are twin faces of diachronic linguistics. In Copies versus Cognates in Bound Morphology Lars Johanson and Martine Robbeets take up this challenge. The result is a wealth of empirical facts and different theoretical approaches, advanced by internationally renowned specialists and young scholars whose research is highly pertinent to the topic.

Copies versus Cognates in Bound Morphology puts genealogical and areal explanation for shared morphology in a balanced perspective and works out criteria to distinguish between morphological cognates and copies. Lars Johanson and Martine Robbeets provide nothing less than the foundations for a new perspective on diachronic linguistics between genealogical and areal linguistics.

Contributors include: Alexandra Aikhenvald, Ad Backus, Dik Bakker, Peter Bakker, Éva Csató, Stig Eliasson, Victor Friedman, Francesco Gardani, Anthony Grant, Salomé Gutiérrez-Morales, Tooru Hayasi, Ewald Hekking, Juha Janhunen, Lars Johanson, Brian Joseph, Folke Josephson, Judith Josephson, Johanna Nichols, Martine Robbeets, Marshall Unger, Nikki van de Pol, Anna Verschik, Lindsay Whaley