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This volume, created by seventeen interdisciplinary authors, brings together pioneering practices that introduce arts into education in Japan. The field of research ranges from kindergarten, primary and secondary school to liberal arts and postgraduate courses at university. The chapters cover both formal and informal settings, such as museums and after school programs. The genres of art include visual art, performance, dance, vocal music, and drama.

Arts-based or arts-inspired methods help students’ artistic inquiry through creative or performative practices, leading to new findings that might not otherwise be described. Artistic practice makes students reflect on their own bodies, emotions, feelings, ways of life, and relationships with others, which leads to creative thinking.

The volume is based on three new trends in art and education: 1) The development of Arts-Based Research in Japan since its introduction from abroad; 2) The introduction of art practice into academic research in various disciplines and diverse educational settings; and 3) The new trend in drama education and theatrical performance in Japan.

Each chapter inspires and provokes discussion among researchers and practitioners in various educational settings on the future direction of art education in Japan and around the world.
The book reflects on the extent to which the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic influenced the education system in Africa, notably South Africa. The advent of the pandemic has brought a new context to the challenges of access, deepening the precarious position of African higher education systems. The pandemic underscored that African higher education systems are fragile and not uniformly resilient. The book discusses the challenges created or further entrenched by COVID-19 and how the typology of inequality across the differentiated institutions impacted the management of education delivery during COVID-19. Per se, lessons learned were documented to inform decision-making and practice while drawing conclusions for future usage. Even though the shift to emergency remote teaching was not foreseen and thus not coordinated, the authors argue that students’ learning styles, perceptions of online learning and digital pedagogy should be considered in the post-COVID-19 curricula development processes.