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A hundred years after A. Schweitzer's Von Reimarus zu Wrede, the study of the historical Jesus is again experiencing a renaissance. Ongoing since the beginning of the 1980's, this renaissance has produced an abundance of Jesus studies that also display a welcome diversity of methods, approaches and hypotheses. The Handbook of the Study of the Historical Jesus is designed to handle this diversity and abundance. Drawing from first-class scholarship throughout the world, the four large volumes of the Handbook offer a unique assembly of leading experts presenting their approaches to the historical Jesus, as well as a thought-out compilation of original studies on a large variety of topics pertaining to Jesus research and adjacent areas.
In the midst of academic debates about the utility of the term “magic” and the cultural meaning of ancient words like mageia or khesheph, this Guide to the Study of Ancient Magic seeks to advance the discussion by separating out three topics essential to the very idea of magic. The three major sections of this volume address (1) indigenous terminologies for ambiguous or illicit ritual in antiquity; (2) the ancient texts, manuals, and artifacts commonly designated “magical” or used to represent ancient magic; and (3) a series of contexts, from the written word to materiality itself, to which the term “magic” might usefully pertain.

The individual essays in this volume cover most of Mediterranean and Near Eastern antiquity, with essays by both established and emergent scholars of ancient religions.

In a burgeoning field of “magic studies” trying both to preserve and to justify critically the category itself, this volume brings new clarity and provocative insights. This will be an indispensable resource to all interested in magic in the Bible and the Ancient Near East, ancient Greece and Rome, Early Christianity and Judaism, Egypt through the Christian period, and also comparative and critical theory.

Contributors are: Magali Bailliot, Gideon Bohak, Véronique Dasen, Albert de Jong, Jacco Dieleman, Esther Eidinow, David Frankfurter, Fritz Graf, Yuval Harari, Naomi Janowitz, Sarah Iles Johnston, Roy D. Kotansky, Arpad M. Nagy, Daniel Schwemer, Joseph E. Sanzo, Jacques van der Vliet, Andrew Wilburn.
Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World
Author:
Where Dreams May Come was the winner of the 2018 Charles J. Goodwin Award of Merit, awarded by the Society for Classical Studies.

In this book, Gil H. Renberg examines the ancient religious phenomenon of “incubation", the ritual of sleeping at a divinity’s sanctuary in order to obtain a prophetic or therapeutic dream. Most prominently associated with the Panhellenic healing god Asklepios, incubation was also practiced at the cult sites of numerous other divinities throughout the Greek world, but it is first known from ancient Near Eastern sources and was established in Pharaonic Egypt by the time of the Macedonian conquest; later, Christian worship came to include similar practices. Renberg’s exhaustive study represents the first attempt to collect and analyze the evidence for incubation from Sumerian to Byzantine and Merovingian times, thus making an important contribution to religious history.

This set consists of two books.
A Self-Study of Educating through Hindu Dance
Volume Editor:
The author aims to use Kuchipudi Indian classical Hindu dance to educate non-Hindus about Hinduism with postcolonialism in mind. This goal arises from her dance experiences and the historical era of imperialism. Colonization occurs when those in power believe there is a need to dominate in a manner that subjugates people. Colonizers created colonies as they moved into territory because they felt there was a need to “civilize” the so-called savages of the land. Postcolonialism is an intellectual discourse that confronts the legacy of colonialism and attempts to de-colonize. With the legacy of colonialism and a postcolonial lens in mind, some research questions arise. How does she, as a Kuchipudi dancer, use Hindu dance to educate non-Hindus about the Eastern literature of Hinduism? For non-Hindus, she feels the power of the exoticizing gaze when she dances, which might very well block the educational intention of the dance. This exoticizing gaze prevents the understanding of the traditional nature of the dance and the introduction to Hinduism as a world religion. The author’s problem is moving the exotic gaze of non-Hindus to an educational gaze that seeks to learn about the ethics of Hinduism in a manner that takes into consideration the multiple perspectives of the complex society we live in today.

“In short, MisirHiralall’s research highlights the role of contemplation and critical-self reflection in creating opportunities for true intercultural relations that respect the epistemologies of traditionally marginalized and stigmatized non-Western religions and cultures. This is essential theoretical and practical research for a multicultural society that is grounded in first-person, lived experience.” – Tyson E. Lewis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Art Education, University of North Texas

“Most impressive is that MisirHiralall is walking her talk through a thoughtful and lyrical self-study that is situated in the in-between: between the mind and body, the gaze of the Other and the self, the Eastern and Western worlds, and the fields of dance, religion, philosophy, cultural studies, and teacher education.” – Monica Taylor, Ph.D., Professor and Deputy Chair of the Department of Secondary and Special Education, Montclair State University

“In MisirHiralall’s Confronting Orientalism, the reader is gifted with a rare glimpse into a philosopher-educator’s wrestling with her teaching through the medium of Hindu dance …. All who think seriously about the context and impact of their teaching in connection with their core values can benefit from reading of this book.” – Michael D. Waggoner, Ph.D., Professor of Postsecondary Education, University of Northern Iowa, Editor of Religion & Education
The Context of Scripture, Volume IV Supplements offers important additions to the previously published three volumes of The Context of Scripture, a major tool for research in the Bible and the ancient Near East. It provides translations of recently discovered texts, alongside new translations of better-known texts, all of which illuminate the literary output found in the Hebrew Bible.

Just like the earlier volumes, Volume IV utilizes the same page layout and large format, generous cross-referencing to comparable Bible passages, and new, up-to-date bibliographical annotations with judicious commentary. It is a wonderful enhancement to this standard reference work of the 21st century.

Author:
Winner of the 2015 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award
Winner of the Frank Moore Cross Award for Best Book in Biblical Studies from ASOR
Winner of the Biblical Archaeology Society 2017 Publication Award for Best Book Relating to the Hebrew Bible

Eugene Ulrich presents in The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Developmental Composition of the Bible ( (also available as paperback) the comprehensive and synthesized picture he has gained as editor of many biblical scrolls. His earlier volume, The Biblical Qumran Scrolls, presented the evidence — the transcriptions and textual variants of all the biblical scrolls — and this volume explores the implications and significance of that evidence.

The Bible has not changed, but modern knowledge of it certainly has changed. The ancient Scrolls have opened a window and shed light on a period in the history of the text’s formation that had languished in darkness for two thousand years. They offer a parade of surprises that greatly enhance knowledge of how the scriptural texts developed through history.
Elliot R. Wolfson is Professor of Religious Studies and the Marsha and Jay Glazer Chair of Jewish Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. A scholar of Jewish mysticism and philosophy, he uses the textual sources of Judaism to examine universal philosophical topics such as the function and processes of the imagination, the paradoxes of temporality, and the mystery of poetic language. Working at the intersection of disciplines and refusing to reduce texts to their simple historical contexts, Wolfson puts texts spanning diverse temporal, cultural, and religious periods in creative counterpoint. His sensitivity to language reveals its fragility as it simultaneously points to the uncertainty of meaning. The result is a creative reading of both Judaism and philosophy that informs and is informed by poetic sensibility and philosophical hermeneutics.
Komposition und Theologie von Josua 1–5
For this book the author has received THE MANFRED LAUTENSCHLAEGER AWARD FOR THEOLOGICAL PROMISE 2015

Kein Auszug ohne Einzug – erst mit dem Eisodus in das verheißene Land kommt der Exodus aus Ägypten an sein Ziel. Es verwundert daher nicht, dass der erste Teil des Josuabuches in den Kapiteln 1–5, in dem dieser Einzug dargestellt wird, vielfältige literarische Bezüge zur Exodusüberlieferung im Pentateuch aufweist. Wie aber sind diese Bezüge zu erklären, als intratextuelle Bindeglieder ein und desselben Werkes oder als intertextuelle Bezugnahmen? Mit dem Aufweis einer sukzessiven Ausgestaltung der Ereignisse beim Eisodus nach dem Vorbild des Exodus bietet die vorliegende Untersuchung der Komposition und Theologie von Josua 1–5 in den drei überlieferten Ausgaben des Josuabuches (MT, LXX, Qumran) Antworten auf alte, angesichts der gegenwärtigen Debatte um Hexateuch und Deuteronomistisches Geschichtswerk hochaktuelle Fragen der Forschung.

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The Exodus from Egypt is perfect only with the Eisodus into the Promised Land. It does not come as a surprise, therefore, that the first part of the Book of Joshua, which is dedicated to the entry into the land, features a variety of literary affinities to the Exodus tradition as found in the Pentateuch. But how are these affinities to be explained? Do they testify to an original literary work which covered both Exodus and Conquest, or do they rather betray subsequent connections through intertextual references? Analyzing the composition and theology of Joshua 1–5 in the three extant versions of the book (MT, LXX, Qumran), the present study contributes to the current debate of the Pentateuch, Hexateuch, and Deuteronomistic History.
In this new commentary on the controversial Gospel of Thomas, Simon Gathercole provides the most extensive analysis yet published of both the work as a whole and of the individual sayings contained in it. This commentary offers a fresh analysis of Thomas not from the perspective of form criticism and source criticism but seeks to elucidate the meaning of the work and its constituent elements in its second-century context. With its lucid discussion of the various controversial aspects of Thomas, and treatment of the various different scholarly views, this is a foundational work of reference for scholars not just of apocryphal Gospels, but also for New Testament scholars, Classicists and Patrologists.
The Text of the New Testament in Contemporary Research: Essays on the Status Quaestionis provides a thoroughly up-to-date assessment of every major aspect of New Testament textual criticism. The twenty-four essays in the volume, all written by internationally acknowledged experts in the field, cover every major aspect of the discipline, discussing the advances that have been made since the mid twentieth century. With full and informative bibliographies, these contributions will be essential reading for anyone interested in moving beyond the standard handbooks in order to see where the discipline now stands, a vade mecum for all students and text-critical scholars for a generation to come.