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Asian Migrant Workers in the Arab Gulf States

The Growing Foreign Population and Their Lives

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Edited by Masako Ishii, Naomi Hosoda, Masaki Matsuo and Koji Horinuki

Asian Migrant Workers in the Arab Gulf States (edited by Masako Ishii, Naomi Hosoda, Masaki Matsuo and Koji Horinuki) examines how nationals and migrants construct new relationships in the segregated socioeconomic spaces of the region (namely, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates).

Instead of assuming that segregation is disadvantageous for migrant workers, it emphasizes multiple aspects and presents various voices. In this way, the book tries to unfold the region’s segregated socioeconomic space, as well as its new forms of networking and connectedness, in order to understand how the various peoples coexist: a situation that often entails conflict and discrepancies between expectations and reality.

Chinese Research Perspectives on Society, Volume 5

Analysis and Forecast of China's Social Conditions (2016)

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Edited by Peilin LI, Guangjin Chen and Yi ZHANG

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Nanny Kim

The commercialized economy of late imperial China depended on efficient transport, yet transport technologies, transport economics as well as its role in local societies and in interdependencies of environments and human activities are acutely under-researched. Nanny Kim analyses two transports systems into the Southwest of Qing China through the long eighteenth century and up to the mid-nineteenth century civil wars. The case studies explore shipping on the Upper Changjiang in Sichuan and through the Three Gorges into Hubei, and road transport out of the Sichuan Basin across northeastern Yunnan and northwestern Guizhou into central Yunnan. Specific and concrete investigations of a river that presented extreme dangers to navigation and carriage across the crunch zone of the Himalayan Plateau provides a basis for a systematic reconstruction of transport outside the lowland centres and their convenient networks of water transport.

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Sandrine Ruhlmann

For Mongols, sharing food is more than just eating meals. Through a process of “opening” and “closing”, on a daily basis or at events, in the family circle or with visitors, sharing food guarantees the proper order of social relations. It also ensures the course of the seasons and the cycle of human life. Through food sharing, humans thus invite happiness to their families and herds. Sandrine Ruhlmann has lived long months, since 2000, in the Mongolian steppe and in the city. She describes and analyzes in detail the contemporary food system and recognizes intertwined ideas and values inherited from shamanism, Buddhism and communist ideology. Through meat-on-the-bone, creamy milk skin, dumplings or sole-shaped cakes, she highlights a whole way of thinking and living.

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Edited by William Hurst

This collection includes seven essays translated from the leading Chinese-language journal Open Times. Bringing together a wide range of leading experts across several disciplines, this book offers critical insights on some of the most important questions of contemporary urban Chinese politics and society. Drawing on extensive research across different localities and issues in China, the chapters offer rich data and fresh analyses of the shifting contours of urban governance, social mobilization and contention, and mechanisms of social control in the new Millennium. Taken together, this collection represents the most comprehensive look in some years at how urban Chinese political institutions have adapted and responded to challenges and how social actors and groups have mobilized to press for redress of substantial new grievances.

The Price and Promise of Specialness

The Political Economy of Overseas Chinese Policy in the People’s Republic of China, 1949–1959

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Jin Li Lim

In The Price and Promise of Specialness, Jin Li Lim revises narratives on the overseas Chinese and the People’s Republic of China by analysing the Communist approach to ‘overseas Chinese affairs’ in New China’s first decade as a function of a larger political economy.
Jin Li Lim shows how the party-state centred its approach towards the overseas Chinese on a perception of their financial utility and thus sought to offer them a special identity and place in New China, so as to unlock their riches. Yet, this contradicted the quest for socialist transformation, and as its early pragmatism fell away, the radicalising party-state abandoned its promises to the overseas Chinese, who were left to pay the price for their difference.

Chinese Research Perspectives on Population and Labor, Volume 5

Achieving Prosperity for All through Shared Development

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Edited by Fang Cai and Juwei Zhang

This translation of selections from Reports on China’s Population and Labor (No. 17) allows readers to take stock of what China has done to tackle some of the country’s most important demographic and labor-related issues. The volume opens with two articles on the universal two-child policy, one of the most eagerly anticipated and closely watched population policy changes in recent years. These are followed by new population forecasts based on the new policy, and an analysis of what they mean for education resource allocation. In addition to familiar topics such as household registration, pension system reform and income distribution, this volume devotes considerable space to examining challenges facing Chinese women, especially those related to employment and marriage.

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Edited by Jianqiang Liu

This volume of the Chinese Research Perspectives on the Environment series is a translation of selections from the 2015 or the 10th edition of the Annual Report on Environment Development of China. Friends of Nature, which has been organizing the writing and compilation of the Annual Report, is the first and continues to be one of the most influential Chinese environmental NGO.
Articles in the current volume, written by a group of academics, independent scholars, activists and journalists cover recent development in a host of environment-related issues in China, including air pollution control, plans and policies on coal consumption, recent developments in environmental criminal justice, China’s role in Antarctic marine conservation, among other topics.

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Edited by Ronald Holzhacker and Dafri Agussalim

The international community has come together to pursue certain fundamental, common goals over the coming period to 2030 to make progress toward ending poverty and hunger, improving social and economic well-being, preserving the environment and combating climate change, and maintaining peace. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been agreed to by states, which have in turn adopted national targets and action plans.
This volume studies the governance and implementation of these goals in Southeast Asia, in particular the difficulties in the shift from the international to the national, the multi-level challenges of implementation, and the involvement of stakeholders, civil society, and citizens in the process. Contributors to this volume are scholars from across Southeast Asia who research these issues in developing (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar), middle-income (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam), and developed countries (Brunei, Singapore) in the region. The perspectives on governance and the SDGs emerge from the fields of political science, international relations, geography, economics, law, health, and the natural sciences.

Care Relations in Southeast Asia

The Family and Beyond

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Edited by Patcharawalai Wongboonsin and Jo-pei Tan

Care Relations in Southeast Asia: The Family and Beyond, edited by Patcharawalai Wongboonsin and Jo-Pei Tan, examines the care relations and transactions within and beyond the family network across three middle-income Southeast Asian countries, namely the Federation of Malaysia, the Kingdom of Thailand and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam at the national and sub-national level. On the national level, changes and continuity in care relations along the changing demographic, socio-economic and political contexts of each country are addressed. On the sub-national level, the complex dimensions of care relations are analyzed by looking at the attitude towards and practice of elderly and child care within, between and beyond the family system. These regional analyses are based on merged data of three most recent family surveys in Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok Metropolis, and Hanoi. Alternative and innovative policy recommendations for current and future challenges are also offered. Contains contributions by: Asmidawati Ashari, Ki Soo Eun, Tengku Aizan Hamid, Rahimah Ibrahim, Thuttai Keeratipongpaiboon, Nguyen Huu Minh, Pataporn Sukontamarn, Jo-Pei Tan, Tran Thi Minh Thi, Kua Wongboonsin and Patcharawalai Wongboonsin