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Edited by Marco Folin and Monica Preti

Natural hazards punctuate the history of European towns, moulding their shape and identity: this book is devoted to the artistic representation of those calamities, from the late Middle Ages to the 20th century. It contains nine case studies which discuss, among others, the relationship between biblical imagery and the realistic depiction of urban disasters; the religious, political and ritual meanings of “destruction subjects” in early modern painting; the image of fire in Renaissance treatises on architecture; the first photographic campaigns documenting earthquakes’ damages; the role of contemporary art in the elaboration of a cultural memory of urban destructions. Thus, this book intends to address one of the main issues of Western civilization: the relationship of European towns with their own past and its discontinuities.
Contributors are Alessandro Del Puppo, Isabella di Lenardo, Marco Folin, Sophie Goetzmann, Emanuela Guidoboni, Philippe Malgouyres, Olga Medvedkova, Fabrizio Nevola, Monica Preti and Tiziana Serena.

Hybrid Cultures – Nervous States

Britain and Germany in a (Post)Colonial World

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Edited by Ulrike Lindner, Maren Möhring, Mark Stein and Silke Stroh

While cultural diversity and hybridity have often been celebrated, they also challenge traditional concepts of national and cultural identity – challenges which have caused considerable anxiety. Various disciplines have often investigated the impact of cultural hybridity, multiculture, and (post)colonialism in relative isolation and with a tendency towards over-theorization and loss of specificity. Greater interdisciplinary cooperation can counter this tendency and encourage sustained comparisons between different former empires and across language boundaries.
This volume contributes to such developments by combining contributions from history, English and German studies, cultural geography, theatre studies, and film studies; by covering both the colonial and the postcolonial period; and by looking comparatively at two different (post)colonial contexts: the United Kingdom and Germany.
The result is productive dialogue across the distinct colonial and migration histories of the UK and Germany, which brings out divergent concepts of cultural difference – but, importantly, without neglecting similarities and transnational developments. The interdisciplinary outlook extends beyond political definitions of identity and difference to include consumer culture, literature, film, and journalism – cultural and social practices that construct, represent, and reflect personal and collective identities.
Section I discusses the historical and contemporary role of colonial experience and its remembrance in the construction of national identities. Section II follows on by tracing the reflections of (post)coloniality and twentieth-century migration in the specific fields of economic history and consumer culture. Section III centres on recent debates about multiculture and national/cultural identity in politics, literature, and film.

Imagology

The cultural construction and literary representation of national characters. A critical survey

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Edited by Manfred Beller and Joep Leerssen

How do national stereotypes emerge? To which extent are they determined by historical or ideological circumstances, or else by cultural, literary or discursive conventions? This first inclusive critical compendium on national characterizations and national (cultural or ethnic) stereotypes contains 120 articles by 73 contributors. Its three parts offer [1] a number of in-depth survey articles on ethnic and national images in European literatures and cultures over many centuries; [2] an encyclopedic survey of the stereotypes and characterizations traditionally ascribed to various ethnicities and nationalities; and [3] a conspectus of relevant concepts in various cultural fields and scholarly disciplines. The volume as a whole, as well as each of the articles, has extensive bibliographies for further critical reading. Imagologyis intended both for students and for senior scholars, facilitating not only a first acquaintance with the historical development, typology and poetics of national stereotypes, but also a deepening of our understanding and analytical perspective by interdisciplinary and comparative contextualization and extensive cross-referencing.

How Far is America From Here?

Selected Proceedings of the First World Congress of the International American Studies Association 22-24 May 2003

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Edited by Theo D'haen, Paul Giles, Djelal Kadir and Lois Parkinson Zamora

How Far is America From Here? approaches American nations and cultures from a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective. It is very much at the heart of this comparative agenda that “America” be considered as a hemispheric and global matter. It discusses American identities relationally, whether the relations under discussion operate within the borders of the United States, throughout the Americas, and/or worldwide. The various articles here gathered interrogate the very notion of “America”: which, whose America, when, why now, how? What is meant by “far”—distance, discursive formations, ideals and ideologies, foundational narratives, political conformities, aberrations, inconsistencies? Where is here—positionality, geographies, spatial compressions, hegemonic and subaltern loci, disciplinary formations, reflexes and reflexivities? These questions are addressed with regard to the multiple Americas within the USA and the bi-continental western hemisphere, as part of and beyond inter-American cultural relations, ethnicities across the national and cultural plurality of America, mutual constructions of North and South, borderlands, issues of migration and diaspora. The larger contexts of globalization and America’s role within this process are also discussed, alongside issues of geographical exploration, capital expansion, integration, transculturalism, transnationalism and global flows, pre-Columbian and contemporary Native American cultures, the Atlantic slave trade, the environmental crisis, U.S. literature in relation to Canadian or Latin American literature, religious conflict both within the Americas and between the Americas and the rest of the world, with such issues as American Zionism, American exceptionalism, and the discourse of/on terror and terrorism.

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Edited by James A. Anderson, Liam O'Dowd and Thomas M. Wilson

Scholarly interest in the study of state borders and border regions is growing in Europe, keeping pace with the remarkable changes associated with the transformation of old borders and the creation of new ones in the European Union and beyond over the last fifteen years. Social scientists have increasingly examined cross-border co-operation as one way to understand the changes which affect European borderlands. Ironically, given the recent turn to issues of culture and identity in the social sciences, one of the most neglected aspects of the critical and comparative analysis of cross-border co-operation has been culture. Culture and Cooperation in Europe's Borderlands, the first collection of essays to provide multidisciplinary perspectives on these issues in European borderlands, presents three modes of analysis of culture and cross-border co-operation as a tentative way forward to redress this imbalance. These overlapping perspectives, on cultures of co-operation, co-operation about culture, and the impact of culture on forms of co-operation, are offered as possible strategies in the comparative social science of European borderlands.
The contributions to this collection examine some or all of the following:
- cross-border cooperation about culture, in such areas of culture as tradition, language use and rights, and education.
- cross-border cooperation and culture, i.e., in ways in which ‘culture’ enhances or hinders economic and political co-operation across state borders, as for example, through issues of national, regional and local identity, cultural practices, and ethnic relations.
- the culture of cooperation, i.e., ways in which co-operation across borders creates new cultural codes, political practices, organizational cultures and transnational social and political institutions.

Schuld und Sühne? 1

Kriegserlebnis und Kriegsdeutung in deutschen Medien der Nachkriegszeit (1945-1961) Internationale Konferenz vom 01.-04.09.1999 in Berlin

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Edited by Ursula Heukenkamp

Der Beginn des Zweiten Weltkrieges liegt mehr als 50 Jahre zurück. Bis heute haben aber die Fragen, mit denen dieses katastrophale Ereignis alle Deutschen konfrontiert, nicht an Bedeutung und Aktualität verloren. Vielmehr fordert das öffentliche Gedächtnis mit jedem Generationswechsel neue Bilder von diesem Krieg. Im Rückblick auf den Zeitraum seit 1945 läßt sich ein Zyklus von Erinnern, Verstummen und erneutem Erinnern ausmachen, der bereits dreifach durchlaufen worden ist. Insofern ist der Umgang mit dem Thema in den deutschen Medien gleich nach Kriegsende auch für die Gegenwart aufschlußreich. Deutungen und Formen des Gedenkens, die heute praktiziert werden, haben selber inzwischen eine Geschichte. Mehrfach glaubte man bereits in beiden Teilen Deutschlands, daß die Schuldfrage gelöst sei und die Kriegserfahrung bewältigt. Jedesmal stellte sich heraus, daß die Deutschen
noch immer in der Schuld sind, nicht nur aus der Perspektive ihrer europäischen Nachbarn. Die Beiträge in diesem Band gehen auf den Anfang eines unabgeschlossenen Prozesses zurück. Die Befragung gilt nicht den Menschen, sondern den Medien. Gefragt wird, wie in der Literatur, in der Presse, im Fernsehen und Film in den 40er und 50er Jahren mit dem Krieg umgegangen worden ist, welche Bilder davon die Literatur, die Presse, Fernsehen, Film und Hörspiel anzubieten hatten und welche Tendenzen sich dabei in den beiden deutschen Staaten, in Österreich, Polen und Frankreich nachweisen lassen. Eine Reflexion auf die neunziger Jahre macht das Thema spannend, denn dadurch wird den Bildern vom Krieg, die im wiedervereinigten Deutschland im Umlauf sind, ihr Ort im Zyklus zugewiesen: Ein Beitrag zur wieder nötig gewordenen Orientierung.

Schuld und Sühne? 2

Kriegserlebnis und Kriegsdeutung in deutschen Medien der Nachkriegszeit (1945-1961) Internationale Konferenz vom 01.-04.09.1999 in Berlin

Series:

Edited by Ursula Heukenkamp

Der Beginn des Zweiten Weltkrieges liegt mehr als 50 Jahre zurück. Bis heute haben aber die Fragen, mit denen dieses katastrophale Ereignis alle Deutschen konfrontiert, nicht an Bedeutung und Aktualität verloren. Vielmehr fordert das öffentliche Gedächtnis mit jedem Generationswechsel neue Bilder von diesem Krieg. Im Rückblick auf den Zeitraum seit 1945 läßt sich ein Zyklus von Erinnern, Verstummen und erneutem Erinnern ausmachen, der bereits dreifach durchlaufen worden ist. Insofern ist der Umgang mit dem Thema in den deutschen Medien gleich nach Kriegsende auch für die Gegenwart aufschlußreich. Deutungen und Formen des Gedenkens, die heute praktiziert werden, haben selber inzwischen eine Geschichte. Mehrfach glaubte man bereits in beiden Teilen Deutschlands, daß die Schuldfrage gelöst sei und die Kriegserfahrung bewältigt. Jedesmal stellte sich heraus, daß die Deutschen
noch immer in der Schuld sind, nicht nur aus der Perspektive ihrer europäischen Nachbarn. Die Beiträge in diesem Band gehen auf den Anfang eines unabgeschlossenen Prozesses zurück. Die Befragung gilt nicht den Menschen, sondern den Medien. Gefragt wird, wie in der Literatur, in der Presse, im Fernsehen und Film in den 40er und 50er Jahren mit dem Krieg umgegangen worden ist, welche Bilder davon die Literatur, die Presse, Fernsehen, Film und Hörspiel anzubieten hatten und welche Tendenzen sich dabei in den beiden deutschen Staaten, in Österreich, Polen und Frankreich nachweisen lassen. Eine Reflexion auf die neunziger Jahre macht das Thema spannend, denn dadurch wird den Bildern vom Krieg, die im wiedervereinigten Deutschland im Umlauf sind, ihr Ort im Zyklus zugewiesen: Ein Beitrag zur wieder nötig gewordenen Orientierung.

1949/1989

Cultural Perspectives on Division and Unity in East and West

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Edited by Clare Flanagan and Stuart Taberner

East Germany

Continuity and Change

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Edited by Paul Cooke and Jonathan Grix

Germany and Eastern Europe

Cultural Identities and Cultural Differences

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Edited by Keith Bullivant, Geoffrey Giles and Walter Pape

The opening up, and subsequent tearing down, of the Berlin Wall in 1989 effectively ended a historically unique period for Europe that had drastically changed its face over a period of fifty years and redefined, in all sorts of ways, what was meant by East and West. For Germany in particular this radical change meant much more than unification of the divided country, although initially this process seemed to consume all of the country's energies and emotions. While the period of the Cold War saw the emergence of a Federal Republic distinctly Western in orientation, the coming down of the Iron Curtain meant that Germany's relationship with its traditional neighbours to the East and the South-East, which had been essentially frozen or redefined in different ways for the two German states by the Cold War, had to be rediscovered. This volume, which brings together scholars in German Studies from the United States, Germany and other European countries, examines the history of the relationship between Germany and Eastern Europe and the opportunities presented by the changes of the 1990's, drawing particular attention to the interaction between the willingness of German and its Eastern neighbours to work for political and economic inte-gration, on the one hand, and the cultural and social problems that stem from old prejudices and unresolved disputes left over from the Second World War, on the other.