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Languaging Without Languages

Beyond metro-, multi-, poly-, pluri- and translanguaging

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Robin Sabino

Drawing on usage-based theory, neurocognition, and complex systems, Languaging Beyond Languages elaborates an elegant model accommodating accumulated insights into human language even as it frees linguistics from its two-thousand-year-old, ideological attachment to reified grammatical systems. Idiolects are redefined as continually emergent collections of context specific, probabilistic memories entrenched as a result of domain-general cognitive processes that create and consolidate linguistic experience. Also continually emergent, conventionalization and vernacularization operate across individuals producing the illusion of shared grammatical systems. Conventionalization results from the emergence of parallel expectations for the use of linguistic elements organized into syntagmatic and paradigmatic relationships. In parallel, vernacularization indexes linguistic forms to sociocultural identities and stances. Evidence implying entrenchment and conventionalization is provided in asymmetrical frequency distributions.

Writing Development in Struggling Learners

Understanding the Needs of Writers across the Lifecourse

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Edited by Brett Miller, Peggy McCardle and Vincent Connelly

In Writing Development in Struggling Learners, international writing researchers provide critical insights into the development of writing skills for individuals who struggle to become profi cient writers. This edited volume takes a life course view and examines concepts for development of writing skills with a focus on where learners struggle, why this may occur for those without and without specifi c learning disorders, how to identify these learners and what we can do to facilitate effi cient writing. Throughout the volume, struggling learners are presented via a holistic lens; contributors succinctly synthesize the literature base and present insights into the current state of the science and areas of future need and advancement.

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Sherman Wilcox

In Ten Lectures on Cognitive Linguistics and the Unification of Spoken and Signed Languages Sherman Wilcox suggests that rather than abstracting away from the material substance of language, linguists can discover the deep connections between signed and spoken languages by taking an embodied view. This embodied solution reveals the patterns and principles that unite languages across modalities. Using a multidisciplinary approach, Wilcox explores such issues as the how to apply cognitive grammar to the study of signed languages, the pervasive conceptual iconicity present throughout the lexicon and grammar of signed languages, the relation of language and gesture, the grammaticization of signs, the significance of motion for understanding language as a dynamic system, and the integration of cognitive neuroscience and cognitive linguistics.

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Dirk Geeraerts

Cognitive Sociolinguistics combines the interest in meaning of Cognitive Linguistics with the interest in social variation of sociolinguistics, converging on two domains of enquiry: variation of meaning, and the meaning of variation. These Ten Lectures, a transcribed version of talks given by professor Geeraerts in 2009 at Beihang University in Beijing, introduce and illustrate both dimensions. The ‘variation of meaning’ perspective involves looking at types of semantic and categorial variation, at the role of social and cultural factors in semantic variation and change, and at the interplay of stereotypes, prototypes and norms. The ‘meaning of variation’ perspective involves looking at the way in which categorization processes of the type studied by Cognitive Linguistics shape how scholars and laymen think about language variation.

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Ewa Dąbrowska

This volume presents a synthesis of cognitive linguistic theory and research on first and second language acquistion, language processing, individual differences in linguistic knowledge, and on the role of multi-word chunks and low-level schemas in language production and comprehension. It highlights the tension between “linguists’ grammars”, which are strongly influenced by principles such as economy and elegance, and “speakers’ grammars”, which are often messy, less than fully general, and sometimes inconsistent, and argues that cognitive linguistics is an empirical science which combines study of real usage events and experiments which rigorously test specific hypotheses.

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John Taylor

A series of 10 lectures on various aspects of Cognitive Linguistics as these relate to matters of language teaching and learning. Topics addressed include the role of categorization, the nature of rules, the encyclopaedic scope of semantics, spatial expressions, metaphor and metonymy, nouns and nominals, tense and aspect, and the theoretical status of the phoneme.

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Edited by Denis Alamargot, Patrice Terrier and Jean-Marie Cellier

Written Documents in the Workplace is divided into three parts, the first of which provides a linguistic definition of professional documents, describing their different types and genres. This definition necessarily takes into account both the formal characteristics of these types of document (e.g. nature of linguistic units involved) and their functional goals (the way these linguistic units are used to fulfill the text's communicative aim). The second part focuses on the mental mechanisms involved in written production in the workplace. One of the aims of a professional writer is to compose a text which can be understood. Text composition involves specific processes and strategies that can be enhanced. This last aspect leads us to devote the third and final section to the comprehension of written documents in the workplace. Awareness of the strategies implemented by different readers (with more or less domain expertise) in order to understand technical and professional documents can enhance the latter's readability.

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Edited by Luuk van Waes, Mariëlle Leijten and Christophe Neuwirth

Digital media has become an increasingly powerful force in modern society. This volume brings together outstanding European, American and Australian research in "writing and digital media" and explores its cognitive, social and cultural implications. The book is divided into five sections, covering major areas of research: writing modes and writing environments (e.g. speech technology), writing and communication (e.g. hypervideos), digital tools for writing research (e.g. web analysis tools, keystroke logging and eye-tracking), writing in online educational environments (e.g. collaborative writing in L2), and social and philosophical aspects of writing and digital media (e.g. CMC, electronic literacy and the global digital divide).In addition to presenting programs of original research by internationally known scholars from a variety of disciplines, each chapter provides a comprehensive review of the current state-of-the-art in the field and suggests directions for future research.