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In his new monograph Early Arsakid Parthia (ca. 250-165 B.C.): At the Crossroads of Iranian, Hellenistic, and Central Asian History, Marek Jan Olbrycht explores the early history of the Arsakid Parthian state. Making use of literary and epigraphic evidence as well numismatic and archaeological sources, Olbrycht convincingly depicts how the Arsakid dynasty created a kingdom (248 B.C.-A.D. 226), small at first, which, within a century after its founding, came to dominate the Iranian Plateau and portions of Central Asia as well as Mesopotamia. The “Parthian genius” lay in the Arsakids’ ability to have blended their steppe legacy with that of sedentary Iranians, and to have absorbed post-Achaemenid Iranian and Seleukid socio-economic, political, and cultural traditions.
Author: Fredrik Hagen
In Ostraca from the Temple of Millions of Years of Thutmose III, Fredrik Hagen publishes a range of texts from recent excavations at Thebes. Although fragmentary, the corpus is one of the richest of its kind in terms of both the number of ostraca and the different types of texts represented, and provides essential new data for anyone interested in ancient Egyptian temples, religion, priests, and social history.

The texts shed light on many aspects of life in an Egyptian temple, including the building of the temple, the daily operations of its cult, the organisation and size of the priesthood, types and quantities of offerings, as well as the broader cultural issues of literacy and the transmission of literature.
Author: Bruce Lincoln
In Religion, Culture, and Politics in Pre-Islamic Iran, Bruce Lincoln offers a vast overview on different aspects of the Indo-Iranian, Zoroastrian and Pre-Islamic mythologies, religions and cultural issues. The book is organized in four sections according to the body of evidence they engage most directly: Avestan, Old Persian, Pahlavi, and Iranian materials in comparison with other data, including studies of myths, especially those with cosmogonic implications, ritual practices, cosmological constructions of space and time, points of intersection between religion, ethics, law, and politics, ideological aspects of scientific and medical theorizing, social organization and gender relations, and other diverse topics.
Author: Jonathan Yogev
In The Rephaim: Sons of the Gods, Jonathan Yogev provides a new theory regarding the mysterious characters, known as "Rephaim," in Biblical and ancient Near Eastern literature. The Rephaim are associated with concepts such as death and the afterlife, divinity, healing, giants and monarchy among others. They appear in Ugaritic, Phoenician and Biblical texts, yet it is difficult to pinpoint their exact function and meaning. This study offers a different perspective, along with full texts, detailed epigraphic analysis and commentary for all of the texts that mention the Rephaim, in order to determine their specific importance in societies of the ancient Levant.
Author: Changyu Liu
In The Ur III Administrative Texts from Puzrish-Dagan Kept in the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East Changyu Liu offers an edition of a collection of 689 cuneiform clay tablets kept in the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East (HMANE, formerly Harvard Semitic Museum), Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. These administrative documents date to the Third Dynasty of Ur (Ur III, ca. 2112–2004 BCE) of Mesopotamian history and are from Puzrish-Dagan (modern Drehem in southern Iraq).

The editions of the 689 Ur III texts, arranged by their catalogue numbers, are significant for further study of how the Puzrish-Dagan organization functioned. New evidence has been gleaned and new conclusions can be drawn from texts in this book.

The Harvard Semitic Studies series publishes volumes from the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East. Other series offered by Brill that publish volumes from the Museum include Studies in the Archaeology and History of the Levant and Harvard Semitic Monographs, https://hmane.harvard.edu/publications.
This collection of eighteen essays addresses critical theological and ethical issues in the book of Job: (1) Prologue: From Eden to Uz; (2) Job and His Friends: “What Provokes You that You Keep on Talking?”; (3) Job and the Priests: “Look At Me and Be Appalled;” (4) Traumatizing Job: “God Has Worn Me Out;” (5) Out of the Whirlwind: “Can You Thunder with A Voice Like God’s?”; (6) Preaching Job and Job’s God: “Listen Carefully to My Words;” (7) Epilogue: “All’s Well That Ends Well” … or Is it? The lead essay raises the question that lingers over the entire book: What are we to think of a God who is complicit in the death of seven sons and three daughters “for no reason”?
Proceedings of an Eighth Symposium on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Ben Sira
Volume Editor: Steven Fassberg
The 21 essays in this volume deal with the language and text of Hebrew corpora from the Second Temple period. They were originally presented at the Eighth International Symposium on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Ben Sira, held in January 2016 in Jerusalem.
Most of the papers focus on the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the light of First and Second Temple Hebrew. A few of the contributions are devoted primarily to the language of Ben Sira, Samaritan Hebrew, and Mishnaic Hebrew. You will find discussions of orthography, phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon, language contact, and sociolinguistics.
Author: Ido Koch
In Colonial Encounters in Southwest Canaan during the Late Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age Koch offers a detailed analysis of local responses to colonial rule, and to its collapse. The book focuses on colonial encounters between local groups in southwest Canaan (between the modern-day metropolitan areas of Tel Aviv and Gaza) and agents of the Egyptian Empire during the Late Bronze Age (16th–12th centuries BCE). This new perspective presents the multifaceted aspects of Egyptian colonialism, the role of local agency, and the reshaping of local practices and ideas. Following that, the book examines local responses to the collapse of the empire, mechanisms of societal regeneration during the Iron Age I (12th–10th centuries BCE), the remnants of the Egyptian–Canaanite colonial order, and changes in local ideology and religion.