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Edited by Jeroen Temperman, T. Jeremy Gunn and Malcolm D. Evans

As the tensions involving religion and society increase, the European Court of Human Rights and the Freedom of Religion or Belief is the first systematic analysis of the first twenty-five years of the European Court's religion jurisprudence. The Court is one of the most significant institutions confronting the interactions among states, religious groups, minorities, and dissenters. In the 25 years since its first religion case, Kokkinakis v. Greece, the Court has inserted itself squarely into the international human rights debate regarding the freedom of religion or belief. The authors demonstrate the positive contributions and the significant flaws of the Court's jurisprudence involving religion, society, and secularism.

Edited by Robert Uerpmann-Wittzack, Evelyne Lagrange and Stefan Oeter

Growing religious antagonisms are challenging the ultimate goal of ‘living together’ in peaceful societies. Living together explores international law responses, beginning with their historic roots, before the perspective shifts to the role of religious institutions and religious law. Contributions of different human rights bodies are analyzed, before further sections deal with the international protection of religion, the relationship between religious beliefs and freedom of expression, and the roles of other individual rights.

Religion and International Law originates from the long-standing cooperation between the German and the French Societies of International Law, thus bringing together the traditions of French laicism and a cooperative German approach. Experts from Austria, Italy, Poland, Portugal and the UK complement the pan-European perspective.

Edited by Gerhard Robbers and W. Cole Durham

In recent years, issues of freedom of religion or belief and state-religion relations have become increasingly important worldwide. While some works have treated such issues regionally, the Encyclopedia of Law and Religion is unique in its breadth, covering all independent nations and jurisdictions as well as the major international organizations, treating the relation between law and religion in its various aspects, including those related to the role of religion in society, the relations between religion and state institutions, freedom of religion, legal aspects of religious traditions, the interaction between law and religion, and other issues at the junction of law, religion, and state.

Offered online and as a five-volume print set – Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, Oceania, Special Territories, International Organizations and Index – this work is a valuable resource for religious and legal scholars alike. Each article provides the following information for the broadest comparative advantage:

• Social facts;
• Historical background;
• Position of religion in the legal system;
• Individual religious freedom;
• Legal status of religious communities;
• Right of autonomy;
• Active religious communities and cultures;
• Labour law within religious communities;
• Religious assistance in public institutions;
• Legal position of religious personnel and members of religious orders;
• Matrimonial and familial laws;
• Religious and criminal laws; and
• Country-specific issues.

Visit the online edition here.

Edited by Nazila Ghanea

The themes and issues explored in this book - religion, human rights, politics and society could not be more relevant to the post 11 September 2001 world. They lie at the heart of global political debate today.
The collection explores these issues after the passing of just over two decades from the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of all Forms of Intolerance and Discrimination based on Religion or Belief. That declaration set out minimum international standards for the elimination of such discrimination. Sadly the challenge of intolerance on the basis of religion or belief continues to plague us, and tackling it seems to have become increasingly entrenched.
The complexity of this phenomenon requires expertise from different quarters. This collection draws from diplomatic, activist and theological quarters and benefits from the analysis of scholars of law, history, religious studies and sociology.
The ten chapters of this collection examine the relationship between human rights, law and religion; offer a typology for the study of religious persecution; problematise the consequences flowing from religious establishment in religiously plural society; analyse the implications of the directions being taken by the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and the protections offered by the European Commission council Directive 2000/43/EC outlawing workplace discrimination; study the 1981 Declaration and its promotion through the work of the UN Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief; and explore the intricacies of this freedom in detail from within the context of the United Kingdom and The Netherlands.

Edited by Carolyn Evans and Mark W. Janis

One of the great tasks, perhaps the greatest, weighing on modern international lawyers is to craft a universal law and legal process capable of ordering relations among diverse people with differing religions, histories, cultures, laws, and languages. In so doing, we need to take the world's peoples as we find them and not pretend out of existence their wide variety.
This volume builds on the eleven essays edited by Mark Janis in 1991 in The Influence of Religion and the Development of International Law, more than doubling its authors and essays and covering more religious traditions. Now included are studies of the interface between international law and ancient religions, Confucianism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as essays addressing the impact of religious thought on the literature and sources of international law, international courts, and human rights law.