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Potentials for a Learning Space in a Changing World
Continuity and Discontinuity in Learning Careers: Potentials for a Learning Space in a Changing World focuses on the new challenges and threats posed to adult education as a potential way out of the economic crisis and social change. It explores the role of adult education in relation to the continuity and discontinuity of the learning careers and identities of adults in a range of adult education learning contexts in Europe and beyond. The focus is on non-traditional students and issues of inequality such as class, gender, ethnicity, age, disability and how inequalities may enable or constrain their learning careers and identities.
Intersecting or Colliding Discourses for LGBTQ People?
Every day, we hear how people, organizations, and ideas are moving across borders. We also hear about fairness and justice as fundamental social values. How, though, do these two discourses—one related to internationalization and the other to equity—converge in lived experience? The post-secondary institution is one setting where that question might be asked and people who are minoritized for their gender or sexual identities can provide important answers. While equity-oriented discourses assure LGBT people that they will be free from harassment and discrimination, an internationalization discourse might call them to engage in places where they are illegal. Equity and Internationalization on Campus shares findings from a Canadian study that explored how LGBT or ally post-secondary faculty, students, and staff encountered these two discourses. It offers much to scholars and staff committed to developing an equitable version of internationalization and an international version of equity.
From Research into Practice
Adults use mathematics extensively in work even though they may deny it or dismiss their numerate behaviour as common sense. Their capacity for mathematics is invisible to them and confirms their ‘non-maths person’ self-perception, which has negative consequences for their life choices. In Adults, Mathematics and Work, the authors tackle and explain a number of paradoxes related to the curious relationship between adults and mathematics. It operationalises the benefits of workplace doctoral research by providing a set of the tools to review this mistaken self-perception in order to make workers’ abilities available for development. It also provides a systematic way of uncovering and recognising informal and non-formal learning to support employability and re-employability in an increasingly fluid work-landscape.
Popular Education at Work
Animating this book is a twofold question: In what ways are adult and popular educators responding to various harsh economic, political, cultural and environmental conditions? In doing so, are they planting seeds of hope for and imaginings of alternative futures which can connect individuals and communities locally and globally to achieve economic, ecological and social justice?
The book illustrates how transformative politics of solidarity often involve actors across vastly different backgrounds. Solidarity is therefore a political relationship that is forged through particular struggles situated in place and time across power differentials. The authors put popular education to work by describing and analysing their strategies and approaches. They do so using accessible language and engaging styles.
Popular education is a medium for dreaming, for imagining other futures. It is also essential for countering the wilful spreading of fake news and propagation of ignorance. Pedagogies of solidarity are necessary to building connections amongst people at a time when competitive individualism and alienation are rampant. Forging solidarity with and amongst communities is a means towards that end, and, indeed, an end in itself.
One Institution's Struggle to Sustain a Vision
In this multi-faceted case study of one progressive institution of adult higher education, the editors and contributors to the volume lay out significant challenges confronting not just non-traditional post-secondary colleges and universities but all institutions of higher education in today’s rapidly changing context. Contending that non-traditional institutions are especially challenged in these turbulent times, they argue that these organizations’ distinctive academic programs are among the most threatened in the landscape of higher education today.
The 19 essays that make up this volume highlight and examine key creative tensions, rich interplays of emphases and values in higher education, in order to illuminate and address more intentionally the questions that we must address: Can we make constructive use of these tensions? Can we recognize what is at stake? And can we chart a course that will both respond innovatively to rapid change and sustain a vision and the purposes and principles on which that vision rests? Taken as a whole, this volume sheds light on the questions and creative tensions that can, with thoughtful attention, help to keep an alternative, progressive vision of adult higher education alive.
Leadership and Adult Learning for Global Food Systems Transformation
So much more than a human necessity, food is an entry point into a range of different topics: culture and tradition, health and well-being, small and large-scale business, ecology and politics, science and the arts, poverty and social justice, land use and civil society, global trade, traditional ecological knowledge, and more. From seed to table, the policies and practices related to all aspects of the food cycle create rich sites for learning and multiple opportunities for leadership. Although the topic of food has been gaining momentum in the field of Adult Education over the past decade, food has been relatively underexplored in the field of Leadership Studies. The purpose of this book, therefore, is to deepen our understanding and knowledge about leadership and adult learning in food-related movements worldwide. With contributing authors representing four countries and various indigenous groups, this book examines the diverse ways in which food activists, scholars, students, and practitioners are already demonstrating, debating, and documenting leadership and learning in the context of global food systems transformation. Furthermore, it documents how these actions are supporting the innovation needed to address the increasingly complex and interconnected socio-economic and environmental challenges associated with food and agriculture. Whereas much leadership theory continues to be developed from cases in business, social movements, or other, more traditional leadership sectors, this book invites leaders and educators to look to their plates and, by extension, to local, small-scale farmers and to nature itself as sources of inspiration in their work.
An International Exchange
This edited volume sets the groundwork for a dialogue between transformative learning and continental theories of Bildung in adulthood. Both theoretical frameworks bring meaning to the complex learning process of individuals as they develop a more critical worldview. In this volume, a variety of authors from different countries and theoretical backgrounds offer new understandings about Bildung and transformative learning through discussion of theoretical analyses, educational practices, and empirical research. As a result, readers gain greater insight into these theories and related implications for teaching for change. From the various chapters an exciting relationship between both theories begins to emerge and provides impetus for greater discussion and further research about two important theories of change in the field of adult education.
Animating Social, Cultural and Institutional Change
This is a book about adult education in the sphere of public museums and art galleries. It aims to enrich and expand dialogue and understanding amongst adult and community educators, curators, artists, directors, and cultural activists who work within and beyond the walls of these institutions. The various chapters take up the complex and interconnected pedagogics of subjectivity, identity, meaning making and interpretation, knowledge, authority, prescription, innovation, and creativity. The contributors are a combination of scholars, professors, graduate students, heritage and cultural adult educators, artists, curators and researchers from Canada, United States, Iceland, England, Scotland, Denmark, Portugal, Italy and Malta. Collectively, they challenge us to think about the dialectics of passivity and engagement, didactics and learning, gender neutrality and radicality, and neutrality and risk-taking amongst a collage of artworks and artefacts, poetry and installations, collections and exhibits, illusion and reality, curatorial practice and learning, argument and narrative, and struggle and possibility that define and shape modern day art and culture institutions. The chapters, set amongst the discursive politics of neoliberalism and patriarchy, racism and religious intolerance, institutional neutrality and tradition, capitalism and neo-colonialism, ecological devastation and social injustice, take up the spirit and ideals of the radical and feminist traditions of adult education and their emphases on cultural participation and knowledge democracy, agency and empowerment, justice and equity, intellectual growth and transformation, critical social and self reflection, activism and risk-taking, and a fundamental belief in the power of art, dialogue, reflection, ideological and social critique and imaginative learning.
An Integrative Developmental Model
This book describes an adult non-formal learning model, Adult Learning for Self and Relational Growth (ALG), aimed at promoting adults’ development in autonomy and interdependence, from early adulthood to old age.
Grounded on tenets from cognitive psychology, philosophy, sociology, and adult education, the model assumes that human development is propelled by two psychological needs, personal betterment and social belonging, and that the materialization of such development requires on the one hand, the exercise of human thought abilities like reflectivity, generativity, and creativity, and on the other, a milieu enabling such exercise.
To address those requirements, the model proposes a conviviality-oriented instructional approach with three learning venues ( Explorations, Enrichments, and Creations) featuring a variety of illustrative courses and projects. The approach offers adults opportunities to access and share information and knowledge leading to critical reflection on their beliefs and value systems, as well as opportunities to use their creativity and generativity to express their ideas and feelings, and to act for the common good.
Attainment of the instructional approach’s objectives, both age-related and general ( Cultivate, Cope and Care), could help adults achieve a decentralized personalist perspective on development. A perspective that, based on personal valuation and justification of individual growth with and by the growth of others, could result in adults’ greater self-determination, humanness, and capacity for social change.
The book also describes and justifies the makeup of the model’s target population and the learning centers suitable for its implementation.
Critical Perspectives on Adult Literacy and Numeracy in a Globalised World
Over the last two decades, an increasingly economistic discourse has dominated discussions about adult literacy and numeracy. This book provides critiques of, and alternative narratives to the dominant discourse.

Authors provide tools and methodologies of critique, including ways of seeing how policies in the countries of focus come to be captured almost completely by the interests of business and industry, as well as how to critically interpret the data that policy makers use to justify their priorities. But adult literacy and numeracy practitioners and learners find spaces and places to pursue learning that matters for the lived experiences of adults and their communities.

Beyond Economic Interests presents the struggles and achievements of practitioners and learners that lead the readers of the book to critically appreciate that a counter narrative to the purely economistic discourse of adult literacy and numeracy is much needed, and possible.