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The purpose of this unique book is to outline the core of game science by presenting principles underlying the design and use of games and simulations. Game science covers three levels of discourse: the philosophy of science level, the science level, and the application or practical level. The framework presented will help to grasp the interplay between forms of knowledge and knowledge content, interplay that evolves through the action of the players.
Few scientists have witnessed such a radical change in their area of research and practice as those who engaged in play and gaming since the 1950s. Since that time game scientists from a whole variety of disciplines started adopting gaming and simulation methods in their research. Rapid advances in information technology and computer science are producing a tool rich environment for the design and use of games, and for humanities studies of games as digital arts and interactive narratives. Game science is advancing through these waves of change, driven by the digital computer game industry, enhanced through computer and information science, as well as through advances in professional gaming such as in education, public and business management, policy development, health care, eco-systems management, and so on.
When asking game scientists about the core of their science, one should expect to hear diverging answers. The common questions about the core of game and play are not new. They refer to: What is the meaning of game and play? What is real and what is virtual reality? How could we build simple and effective games from complex social systems? Are we able to bring forward a general theory of games? Are we able to help players (social actors) to find smart solutions and approaches to complex issues? How do games enhance learning and how do they improve our thinking capacity and action repertoire?
Current answers to these questions are scattered and inadequate. This book offers a frame-of-reference that will enlighten the characteristics of particular games and simulations from a common perspective. The author pays less attention to instrumental reasoning than on theoretical and methodological questions. Answers will provide a suitable context for addressing design science and analytical science approaches to artifact design and assessment, and theory development and testing. Due to the high diversity of approaches that game science has to accommodate the author chooses an interdisciplinary and where appropriate a meta-disciplinary approach.
Studies on John Mason’s Contribution to Mathematics Education
John Mason has been a prominent figure in the research field of mathematics education for several decades. His principal focus has been thinking about mathematical problems, supporting those who wish to foster and sustain their own thinking and the thinking of others.
Among the many markers of his esteemed career was the 1984 publication of Thinking Mathematically (with Leone Burton and Kaye Stacey). It has become a classic in the field, having been translated into many languages and in use in countries around the world. Thinking Mathematically and other writings in his substantial body of work are used with advanced high school students, with pre-service and practicing teachers, and by researchers who are interested in the nature of doing and learning mathematics.
This book is not, and at the same time is, a tribute to the enormous contributions made by Mason to mathematics education. It is not a tribute book because every chapter is a report of research and thinking by the authors, not simply a statement of appreciation. All engage with how others have taken Mason’s ideas forward to extend their own research and thinking. At the same time it is a tribute book. It is about how research and teaching has been inspired by Mason through his substantial opus and his vibrant presence in a network of mathematics educators.
Using Systems Models and Simulations to Improve Understanding and Problem Solving in Complex Domains
Model-Based Approaches to Learning provides a new perspective called learning by system modeling. This book explores the learning impact of students when constructing models of complex systems. In this approach students are building their own models and engaging at a much deeper conceptual level of understanding of the content, processes, and problem solving of the domain, which is proven to be successful by research from the area of mindtools. Topics covered include the foundations of knowledge structures and mental model development, modeling for understanding, modeling for assessment, individual versus collaborative modeling, and the use of simulations to support learning and instruction in complex, cognitive domains. The thread tying these chapters together is an emphasis on what the learner is doing when he is engaged in modeling and simulation construction rather than merely interacting with constructed simulations.
Model-Based Approaches to Learning is an interesting book for Educators (Instructors, K-12 Teachers), who are looking for forms to use advanced computer technology in classrooms. Also Teachers’ educators who are working on the integration of technology into their teacher preparation classrooms can find new concepts and best-practice examples in this book. This also holds true for all Educators and Researchers who are interested in modeling as an activity to successfully work with ill-structured and complex problems.
A Deleuzian Perspective
Editors: Diana Masny and David R. Cole
Narratives of Identity and Pluralism
This book is a collection of readable, accessible, compelling, varied, voiced, passionate, real, textured, multi-faceted, hybrid, fearless, fearful, cautious, bold, modest, and inspired accounts of living Islam in relation to mainstream schooling in the West.
The book helps to make the diverse experiences of Muslim students (from elementary through university, student through professor) both contextual and complex. The politics and education about Islam, Muslims, Arabs, Turks, Iranians and all that is associated with the West’s popular imagination of the monolithic “Middle-East” has long been framed within problematics. The goal of this book is to push back against the reductive mainstream narratives told about Muslim and Middle Eastern heritage students for generations if not centuries, in mainstream schools. The chapters are each authored by Muslim-acculturated scholars.
This book will be of interest to teachers, administrators, students and scholars. As well, the content is suited to fields of study including ethnic studies, critical multicultural education, anti-oppression approaches to education, curriculum studies, social issues in education, social contexts of education, and qualitative research in education.
WINNER! of the National Association for Multicultural Education’s 2010 Philip C. Chinn book award!
Rereading the historical record indicates that it is no longer so easy to argue that history is simply prior to its forms. Since the mid-1990s a new wave of research has formed around wider debates in the humanities and social sciences, such as decentering the subject, new analytics of power, reconsideration of one-dimensional time and three-dimensional space, attention to beyond-archival sources, alterity, Otherness, the invisible, and more. In addition, broader and contradictory impulses around the question of the nation - transnational, post-national, proto-national, and neo-national movements—have unearthed a new series of problematics and focused scholarly attention on traveling discourses, national imaginaries, and less formal processes of socialization, bonding, and subjectification. New Curriculum History challenges prior occlusions in the field, building upon and departing from previous waves of scholarship, extending the focus beyond the insularity of public schooling, the traditional framework of the self-contained nation-state, and the psychology of the schooled individual. Drawing on global studies, historical sociology, postcolonial studies, critical race theory, visual culture theory, disability studies, psychoanalytics, Cambridge school structuralisms, poststructuralisms, and infra- and transnational approaches the volume holds together not despite but because of differences and incommensurabilities in rereading historical records.
Proceedings from NORMA08 in Copenhagen, April 21-April 25, 2008
Editor: Carl Winsløw
This volume presents the “state-of-the-art” of Nordic research on mathematics education within four broadly defined areas:
the study and design of mathematics teaching in classrooms
the identity and education of mathematics teachers
the use of new technology in mathematics education
meanings and challenges of providing mathematical education to all citizens in modern societies.
It provides the reader with insights into research done not only by scholars from the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Iceland), but also by colleagues from the rest of Europe—and even other parts of the world.
While the principal research questions addressed are universal in nature, their investigation in concrete contexts will inevitably relate to more contingent issues and conditions. This book offers both in-depth view into the reality of mathematics teaching in the settings studied by the authors, syntheses by world renowned scholars of current problems and methods within each of the four areas, and cross-links to studies done in different countries, as represented both by this book and by the wealth of referenced literature it draws upon. Each of the book’s four sections therefore provides rich material for studies within the corresponding areas, for the beginner as well as for the expert.
The chapters of the book result from the work of the fifth Nordic congress in research on mathematics education, which was held in Copenhagen in April 2008. It includes 32 full research papers, 8 agendas and reports from discussions in working groups, and 22 short communications.
Teaching and Researching Comparative and International Education in the Nordic Countries
This volume represents the work of sixteen authors, who all work at different universities and other academic institutions in the Nordic countries. It provides insight into the diversity of research being conducted in the northernmost parts of Europe. Although it would be incorrect to assert that research in this far away part of Europe represents something drastically different than that done in other parts of the world, it would be equally incorrect to maintain that being at the outskirts, on the cusp, or on the periphery _ whichever way one wishes to describe the position of the Nordic countries in relation to the rest of the world—does not influence the ways in which educational processes, phenomena and their consequences are viewed.
These sixteen Nordic Voices discuss with readers different issues regarding teaching and researching Comparative and International Education in the Nordic countries. The editors began their collaboration in 2006, working together to revitalize the Nordic Comparative and International Education Society. NOCIES was officially re-established in May, 2008.
Halla B. Holmarsdottir, who is from Iceland, lives and works in Norway, where she is Associate Professor in Multicultural and International Education at Oslo University College.
Mina O’Dowd, whose father is from the USA and mother is Norwegian, lives and works in Sweden. Nordic Voices: Teaching and Researching Comparative and International Education in the Nordic Countries is a result of the collaboration that began over three years ago.
Scholars, Musicians and the Crisis of the Psyche
Scholars and musicians from many different backgrounds will find this book helpful as it deals with psychic problems in both professions. This book might help scholars and musicians to find a way out of their psychic dilemmas. From classical musicians to rock stars, from curriculum theorists to music teachers, from anthropologists to philosophers, this book takes the reader through a rocky intellectual terrain to explore what happens when one can no longer play or work. The driving question of the book is this: What do you do when you cannot do what you were called to do? This is what the author calls The Crisis of Psyche. The theoretical framework for this book combines curriculum theory, psychoanalysis and phenomenology. Here, the author looks at issues of emotion and the working through of crisis points in the lives of both scholars and musicians. Psychoanalytic theory helps to flesh out and untangle what it means to suffer from a damaged musical psyche and a damaged scholarly psyche. How to work through psychic inertia as a scholar? How to work through through psychic inertia as a musician? From Pink Floyd to Laurie Anderson, from Marion Milner to William F. Pinar, this book draws on the work of a wide range of musicians and scholars to find a way out of psychic blocks. From Philip Glass to Pablo Casals, from Michael Eigen to Mary Aswell Doll, this book draws on the work of composers, cellists, psychoanalysts and educationists to find a way out of psychic meltdowns.
Perspectives on Teaching the US Labor Movement
Contemporary American youth live in a culture that ignores or denigrates labor unions. Mainstream media cover labor issues only sparingly and unions no longer play much of a role in popular culture texts, films, or images. In our schools labor has been limited to a footnote in textbooks instead of being treated seriously as the most effective force for championing the rights of working people—the vast majority of the citizenry. Teachers have been convinced that to bring up class or to teach about the labor movement may be construed as “taking sides,” while the all-pervasive presence of corporate America in our schools is rarely questioned. So for all the talk of schools preparing young people for the work world, we are failing to teach them even the basics of how that world is structured or how they can be empowered through collective action.
Organizing the Curriculum: Perspectives on Teaching the US Labor Movement is the first book-length treatment of this blind spot in contemporary curriculum and pedagogy. Contributors to this collection—unionists, activists, teachers, teacher educators, and academics—interrogate the ways in which knowledge is constructed in school discourses, conceptualize pedagogical strategies and curricula that open discussions around class analysis and political economy via studies of the labor movement, and put forward an activist vision of education that truly engages young people beyond the classroom walls.