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Instructional situations Case Analysis, Critical Autobiography, and Action Research
This book examines self-study methodologies and their relevance to professional growth among teachers. The book puts forward the following arguments: Self-study as a research approach involves basic research skills, therefore constituting an important step for non-professional inquirers aspiring to more complex research. Self-study is a powerful tool in support of professional growth among teachers. Self-study comprises a set of approaches, among them instructional situations case analysis, critical autobiography, and action research. The book offers some interesting perspectives on the following issues: - The book focuses on the writer’s experience as a teacher educator who has elicited and motivated self-studies among student teachers and teachers. - The book brings together three related self-study methodologies: instructional situations case analysis, critical autobiography, and action research. - The book offers a new perspective on implementing and analyzing instructional situation cases through the "authentic case of teaching" and the "expected case of teaching, " a perspective developed by the writer and implemented in her classes. - The book provides a fresh view of critical autobiography as a powerful tool teachers can use to examine their own practice and professional development. - The book introduces critical discourse analysis as a useful tool for researchers. This tool enables teacher-inquirers to reveal their’sense of professional self' and their professional identity as it emerges in teaching cases they provide. - Teachers and researchers can easily apply the methodologies described in this book to their own teaching and research arenas.
Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators is a comprehensive text that delineates a range of research methodologies. This edited volume, with many chapters written by self-study scholars who are noted in the field for particular methodological and epistemological perspectives, helps fill the gap in the literature on self-study research methods. It provides readers with an opportunity to examine various methodologies which will not only help them deepen their understanding of research but also, will allow them to select one that best suits their needs. Both new and experienced researchers will find this text valuable. We consider Self-Study Research Methodologies for Teacher Educators a valuable contribution to the field of teacher education.
Social Capital, Professionalism and Diversity is a response to the challenges faced by teachers and other public sector professionals in attempting to manage an increasingly diverse population, whilst simultaneously being subjected to public scrutiny through measures of performance.
Social capital has increasingly been seen by policy makers and academics as a possible resource for education, allowing children and young people, and the professionals who work with them, to do better as a result of having strong networks, relationships and trust. There has, however, been little attention to how social capital might actually be used by professionals within educational contexts or to the benefits of enhanced social capital for children and young people, their families, and the professionals themselves.
The contributors to this volume provide commentaries on what is known about social capital and its use in educational contexts; the engagement of teachers and other professionals with diversity; and social capital and diversity among children, young people and families.
Social Capital, Professionalism and Diversity will appeal to teacher educators and policymakers with concerns about the challenges faced by teachers and other public sector professionals and with an interest in how social capital might enable an effective response to diversity in educational contexts. The book will be of particular interest and use to student and beginning teachers in responding to diversity as they develop their own professional identities and to practising teachers with an interest in pursuing new forms of professional renewal.
Multicultural issues are part of the agenda for researchers, academics, and politicians. The new technologies have brought multiculturality into our professional and personal lives, opening new possibilities for social interactions among people from different countries, cultures, ages, and gender. Being able to deal with diversity, including other cultures, is a must in the 21st century.
This book is an opportunity to read narratives about social interactions in multicultural settings, and to discuss the role they play in the construction of school and social achievement. It is not only a book on multiculturality. It is also a multicultural book, including an introduction and 13 chapters from authors representing 11 countries, and many more cultures. It is a journey that brings you through different settings, situations and scenarios, describing them vividly, so that the reader can have an authentic taste of them.
This is a book that researchers, academics, teachers, policy makers, and politicians should read. It illuminates many of the problems related to multiculturality. But it also reports on educational experiences and forms of interacting that help solving these problems. It also illustrates the barriers that still exist and that keep many persons apart from equity.
Moreover, due to its narrative mood - the descriptions of what happens in different educational systems, and episodes that could happen to us all, including our kids - this is a book for parents, youngsters, and all the ones interested in knowing other cultures. After all, education is an issue that is related to each human being. We are all cultural individuals, who need to interact with each other. Thus, this is a book to learn how social interactions, in such a demanding multicultural world, can help us live in peace and understand each other.
Love and acceptance through the eyes of a mother of sexual and gender minority children
What would you do if your child told you that he or she had something “very difficult” to tell you? How would you respond? Would you sit down and try to understand what your child was trying to communicate to you? Would you respond in anger, judgment, or irritation? Would you even give your child your full attention? And after listening to your child, would you attempt to ignore, dismiss, or even deny what your child was trying to tell you?
These are important questions for all parents to ask—and answer—because it is vitally important that parents understand how to respond to the significant questions that our children present to us with care and consideration. This understanding is especially critical for parents who are faced with the additional—and unexpected—challenge of how to respond when what is so “very difficult” for their child to tell them is that he or she is lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning their identity (LGBTQ).
Given the strong societal stigma against the LGBTQ population, as well as the lack of education with respect to parenting skills, sexuality, gender, and identity development, many parents feel overwhelmed, ashamed, and isolated. As a result, despite coming out in increasing numbers, almost half of LGBTQ youth face an uncertain future due to parental and societal rejection.
A Soul Has No Gender is the story of one mother’s inquiry into her experience of coming to accept the sexual and gender identities of her fraternal twins, who are lesbian and female-to-male transgender, and how the experience transformed not only her relationships with her children, but with herself as well.
Over the years, researchers have developed statistical methods to help them investigate and interpret issues of interest in many discipline areas. These methods range from descriptive to inferential to multivariate statistics. As the psychometrics measures in education become more complex, vigorous and robust methods were needed in order to represent research data efficiently. One such method is Structural Equation Modeling (SEM).
SEM is a statistical technique that allows the simultaneous analysis of a series of structural equations. It also allows a dependent variable in one equation to become an independent variable in another equation. It is a comprehensive statistical approach to testing hypotheses about relations among observed and latent variables. SEM is commonly known as causal modeling, or path analysis, which hypothesizes causal relationships among variables and tests the causal models with a linear equation system. As educational research questions become more complex, they need to be evaluated with more sophisticated tools. The pervasive use of SEM in the literature has shown that SEM has a potential to be of assistance to modern educational researchers.
This book will bring together prominent educators and researchers from around the world to share their contemporary research on structural equation modeling in educational settings. The chapters provide information on recent trends and developments and effective applications of the different models to answer various educational research questions. This book is a critical and specialized source that describes recent advances in SEM in international academia.
Building Learning Communities that Endure
Drawing on two decades of research into the nature of schools as learning communities, the authors build on a prior model of learning communities that integrated three domains of capacity: personal, interpersonal, and organizational. In this text, the authors move the capacity-building model into practice and elaborate a theory of learning communities.
This book situates learning communities in living systems and ecological perspectives. The fundamental premise is that all of human life and human activity is part of a deep planetary ecology of which mutuality and interdependence are cornerstone properties, learning and renewal are key processes, and emergent networks are foundational structures. The text juxtaposes these conceptions with educational practices in order to understand what makes practice different in learning community schools. The authors argue that sustainable educational improvement emerges from a reciprocal process of building people who are constantly learning, building commitments to authentic learning, and building schools with a relentless focus on learning. The authors conclude that building a sustainable learning community requires a profound shift in how learning is understood, discussed, valued, enabled, and expressed. This shift, they argue, is essential as schools face the challenges and opportunities in the knowledge society.
International Perspectives
Teacher Assemblage is a groundbreaking report in the tradition of fieldwork in philosophy, using Michel Foucault’s and Gilles Deleuze’s ideas to better understand how accountability policy affected teachers. The case study examines different vectors of power and demonstrates how teachers interacted with each other, and interacted with their immediate policy environments. This unique book provides readers with grounded insights into Foucault’s and Deleuze’s ideas by paying close attention to the macro- and micro- political worlds of schools as teachers struggle with new forms of performance accountability. The book illustrates ideas of power, politics, and policy with a unique use of surrealist art to illustrate the philosophical ideas at play in the case study. The book will have a wide appeal to teachers, teacher educators, educational researchers, policy and curriculum scholars, art aficionados, and those interested in the thoughts of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze.
Aims, Modules, Evaluation
Within the central topics of the debate on teachers’ professionalism are the problems of research-based and evidence-based initial and lifelong teacher behavior. Although the statements on professional similarities of teacher actions with those of other (academic) professionals are very plausible, there remains a central task for teacher education programs: How to develop towards such expertise—which is equal to evidence convictions—effectively and efficiently. Which role do scientific research and its results play in this context? How can research results be converted into recommendations for teacher actions?
The contributions to this book focus on central problems of the conversion process: In the first part the goal dimension is treated: Maiello & Oser emphasize the relationship of central variables of teacher behaviour as identity, professional satisfaction or self-efficacy to teachers’ professional behaviour; Blömeke, Felbrich & Müller discuss the role of future teachers’ beliefs on the nature of mathematics; Stevenson uses cultural historical activity theory to work out cognitive schemas that can be targeted in vocational teacher education; Gruber tackles the problem of how vocational teachers can be supported to become experts by discussing especially four major possible research strategies.
The second part of this book is dedicated to possible intervention approaches by which the gap of theory and practice shall be bridged. Steiner & Steiner report on critical learning incidents which heavily influence the micro-processes which characterize teachers’ instructional measures; Winther differentiates the trait and state perspective of motivation with regard to their consequences for the learning process; Boekaerts focuses on aspects of collaborative learning; Weber sharpens her deliberations explicitly to a design experiment on the problem of initiating intercultural learning.
The third part of this book is a report of the use and the consequences of Oser’s model of teaching standards. Baer, Dörr, Fraefel, Kocher, Kiester, Larcher, Müller, Sempert & Wyss show results of a large study on the development of teacher competences run in Switzerland and Germany. The study observes the competence development of prospective teachers from the beginning of their teaching training up to the job entry phase. This book is published under the auspices of the Swiss Federal Office for Professional Education and Technology.
Citizenship Education as Critical Pedagogy
As we move forward well into the 21st century most citizens around the globe seemingly accept the rudiments of a democratic citizenship. And yet in spite of this broad acceptance, a clear articulation of what democratic citizenship entails remains somewhat elusive. In this book, Hyslop-Margison and Thayer achieve two critically important objectives in response to this problem. First, they successfully articulate the threat to democracy posed by current citizenship education programs that adopt a largely instrumental framework fostering passivity and compliance by protecting the established parameters of neo-liberal social design. Second, they show a way out of this anti-democratic trap by illustrating how critical theory, with its marvelous ability to provide trenchant critiques of capitalism and turn those critiques into concrete political action, provides the ideal pedagogical approach to educate our students effectively as future democratic citizens. The authors critique the conditions of modern democratic citizenship and distinguish a robust, or thick, version of citizenship based on citizen agency and participation in the construction of social reality from contemporary models that undermine citizen engagement. They contend that it is only through critical theory and the political agency it inspires that meaningful democratic change can and must occur. Hence, the role of education in their view is not merely to prepare students for a new economic reality, but to prepare them instead to shape that reality in more progressive and socially just ways. This book eloquently argues that the citizenship mission of schools ought to teach students what is possible rather than simply objectifying them as human capital being prepared for the inevitable impact of the policies determined by others.