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Fanon and the Counterinsurgency of Education takes up the challenge of an anti-colonial reading of Fanon to broach questions of identity, difference and belonging, and the implications for schooling and education. The authors deliberately offer a careful and selective capturing of Fanon’s works, pointing to the relevance for oppressed communities as they resist re-organized colonial relations in schooling and education. While colonialism and neo-colonialism have functioned and continue to function differently in diverse environments and social contexts, contributions in the book enthuse that we must raise new questions in a bold attempt to re-theorize colonial relations, social difference and the representational politics of education. Educators must ask new questions in order to contribute to knowledge of how to resist the entrapments of colonialism, racism, exploitation and alienation. Frantz Fanon’s oeuvre is informative to the pursuit of critical education, especially, when we examine the colonial encounter and the colonized experience. The book offers concrete lessons in the struggle to revise education to meet the needs of diverse communities.
Making Health Care Futures Through Technology
Ontologies for Developing Things is a work of unflagging intelligence and intellectual energy, spilling over with new ideas, surprising angles, sharp perceptions and interesting juxtapositions, and written with correspondingly attractive punch and force. Readers interested in information technologies, contemporary developments in social studies of science, and related cultural and political theory will find the book immensely engaging and endlessly useful. - Barbara Herrnstein Smith, Duke University and Brown University [author of Scandalous Knowledge: Science Truth and the Human and/or Natural Reflections: Human Cognition at the Nexus of Science and Religion]
Christopher Emdin is an assistant professor of science education and director of secondary school initiatives at the Urban Science Education Center at Teachers College, Columbia University. He holds a Ph.D. in urban education with a concentration in mathematics, science and technology; a master’s degree in natural sciences; and a bachelor’s degree in physical anthropology, biology, and chemistry.
His book, Urban Science Education for the Hip-Hop Generation is rooted in his experiences as student, teacher, administrator, and researcher in urban schools and the deep relationship between hip-hop culture and science that he discovered at every stage of his academic and professional journey. The book utilizes autobiography, outcomes of research studies, theoretical explorations, and accounts of students’ experiences in schools to shed light on the causes for the lack of educational achievement of urban youth from the hip-hop generation.
Social Justice in Exploitative Times
Activist and Socially Critical School and Community Renewal comes about at an incredibly important point in history, and it offers a genuinely new paradigm. This book attempts what few others have tried—to bring together knowledge and literature around school reform and community renewal through authentic ethnographic stories of real schools and communities. The book describes and analyzes a courageous struggle for a more socially just world, around notions of relational solidarity that speak back to ideas that continue to privilege the already advantaged. This book provides some desperately needed new storylines as a basis for school and community renewal for the most excluded groups in society. It provides a new social imagination for ‘doing school’ in contexts that stand to benefit from school and community voiced approaches.
International Perspectives
Tina Besley has edited this collection which examines and critiques the ways that different countries, particularly Commonwealth and European states, assess the quality of educational research in publicly funded higher education institutions. Such assessment often ranks universities, departments and even individual academics, and plays an important role in determining the allocation of funding to support university research. Yet research is only one aspect of academic performance alongside teaching and service or administration components. The book focuses on the theoretical and practical issues that accompany the development of national and international systems of research assessment, particularly in the field of education. In our interconnected, globalised world, some of the ideas of assessment that have evolved in one country have almost inevitably travelled elsewhere especially the UK model. Consequently the book comprises an introduction, eighteen chapters that discuss the situation in ten countries, followed by a postscript. It gathers together an outstanding group of twenty-five prominent international scholars with expertise in the field of educational research and includes many with hands-on experience in the peer review process. The book is designed to appeal to a wide group of people involved as knowledge workers and knowledge managers—academics, students and policy makers - in higher education and interested in assessment and accountability mechanisms and processes.
International Perspectives from Adult Education
This book holds two main concepts: citizenship and adult education, and presents a diverse scope of ideas and experiences from different countries and perspectives in a rich indication to edify liberating practices and researches.
Citizenship is closely linked with participation. When people are encouraged to take part in an authentic process of decision making, people do participate in public affairs. Here is the true meaning of citizenship related to the old idea to take part, to get involved in public issues and transform their community through participation.
On the other hand, Lifelong Learning’s concepts and practices seem to have forgotten that adult education is more than the preparation for a job. Adult education is learning for democracy; researching communities searching for a school for all; transforming communities; struggling for our rights; becoming awareness about environmental hazards; edifying the city or expressing ourselves through theatre or public art. Lifelong Learning’s concepts and practices seem to have forgotten that life is more than the labour market. The entire life of women and men are the substance of what adult education is made of.
The book is not only addressed to scholars, under and postgraduate students interested in citizenship and adult education, but also to practitioners working in communities in a participatory way.
Dystopia, Utopia and the Plasticity of Humanity
Beyond dominant tendencies to contrast utopia and ideology, the book reconceptualizes utopia and approaches it along with the notion of dystopia. The interplay of utopia and dystopia is examined, some major anti-utopian arguments are refuted and a new utopianism emerges, one that radicalizes critique and makes engagement with present global realities more pressing.
Educated fear, i.e., a critical awareness of dystopian realities, and educated hope, i.e., a critical awareness of the possibility of human perfectibility cohabit a theoretical space that breaks with utopianist modern theoretical underpinnings and becomes historically and spatially more inclusive, while retaining the motivational and justificatory force of ethical imagery. If education is not just an institution of unreflective socialization, if it is about futurity, it has to renegotiate utopian thought. As the interest in utopia is being renewed both in general philosophy and philosophy of education and as dystopia is still neglected, a book that re-defines utopianism and explores for the first time the role of dystopia in radicalizing educational demands for systemic change is indispensable for Utopian Studies, Philosophy and Philosophy of Education academics and students alike.
The title of the book is first transliterated into Utopia, a typeface in which Brazilian artists Angela Detanico and Rafael Lain replace capital letters with the iconic buildings of Brazil´s foremost modernist architect, Oscar Niemeyer, whilst lower-case letters are equated with urban interferences such as fences, skateboarders, CCTV cameras, electricity cables, in short, all those elements that escaped the utopian dream of the architect. To me, it bears associations of the philosophical notion of counterfactuality and of Adorno´s notion of mimesis. The title is then transliterated into Helvetica Concentrated (a digital typeface that concentrates the surface of Helvetica characters in dots which has been created by Detanico and Lain in collaboration with Jiri Skala). The term Helvetica bears the associations of a modernist utopia of success, performativity, prosperity, predictability, rational planning and uniformity.
Perspectives from Asia, Africa and the Americas
Education, development and decolonization provides a historical, theoretical and practical inter-disciplinary analysis of the contemporary trajectory of colonization (including internal colonization) through the linked projects of eurocentric development, globalization and the uncritical adoption of colonial modes of education and learning in schools, communities, social movements and the “progressive” church in Asia, Africa and the Americas. Critical perspectives on colonialism, education and development are deployed in the interests of a continued praxis of decolonization. This collection is intended for graduate and senior undergraduate students in adult/education, development studies, social movement learning and de/colonization and cultural studies, as well as for civil society and social movement actors, development practitioners and socio-cultural workers and popular educators working in North-South engagements. A mix of theoretical and applied/practical content ensures that this collection will be of use to theoreticians, analysts and practitioners alike.
Michel Foucault’s concept of governmentality originated in a lecture series in the late 1970s at the Collège de France and soon became the basis for a range of historical and contemporary studies across the social sciences and humanities. The concept in part rests on a simple but powerful idea that links government to the freedom of the subject in a novel understanding of liberal politics. It also provides an analytics of power based on the examination of actual practices. This is the first collection to use Foucault’s concept in relation to the field of education where it has a natural home given that much educational theory and practice in the liberal tradition at least since Kant has been directed at the goals of autonomy and self-government. The volume has three sections: a general section on Foucault and governmentality with contributions from some of the world’s leading scholars in the area, including Colin Gordon, Jacques Donzelot, and Thomas Lemke; and two sections devoted to governmentality and education, the first outlining Anglo-American perspectives, the second, focusing on European perspectives, with contributions from leading scholars such as Tom Popkewitz, James Marshall, Tom Osborne, Michael Peters, Mark Olssen, Tina Besley, Hermann J. Forneck, Bernadette Baker, Susan Weber, Susanne Maurer, Linda Graham, and Maarten Simons and Jan Masschelein, among many others.
Market and the Next Generation of Educational Reform
This book is about the end of an era in education. It argues that schooling as we know it will cease to exist and be replaced with something else. Education will undergo a radical, fundamental change, replacing traditional compulsory schooling with a market-based system of learning that is finely tuned to demand and does not rely on extra-economic coercion. The premise of the book is to treat school learning as a form of labor. Its genre lies somewhere between educational theory and a political economy of education.
The author explores the origins of the contemporary mass schooling models and redefines school learning in terms of labor, with special reference to genesis of education and to the history of childhood in its connection with schooling. Schools are described as islands of non-market, semi-feudal economies in the midst of the sea of markets, which explains some of the most common worries about learning motivation. The book offers several critiques of the most influential thoughts on schooling today: Progressivism, the Human Capital theory, the belief in intrinsic motivation, the voucher movement and the accountability reform. And finally, it outlines two alternative solutions for educational problems which stem from the essential lack of learning motivation. This book is an invitation to resurrect the tradition of asking fundamental questions about education. Improving what is essentially a flawed institution can take us only so far; the author is inviting the reader to go further.