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New digital technologies offer many exciting opportunities to educators who are looking to develop better teaching practices. When technologies are new, however, the potential for beneficial and effective implementations and applications is not yet fully recognized. This book is intended to provide teachers and researchers with a wide range of ideas from researchers working to integrate the new technology of Augmented Reality into educational settings and processes. It is hoped that the research and theory presented here can support both teachers and researchers in future work with this exciting new technology.

Contributors are: Miriam Adamková, Gilles Aldon, Panayiota Anastasi, Ferdinando Arzarello, Martina Babinská, Robert Bohdal, Francisco Botana, Constadina Charalambous, Eva Csandova, Omer Deperlioglu, Monika Dillingerová, Christos Dimopoulos, Jiri Dostal, Jihad El-Sana, Michael N. Fried, Maria Fuchsová, Marianthi Grizioti, Tomas Hlava, Markus Hohenwarter, Kateřina Jančaříková, Konstantinos Katzis, Lilla Korenova, Utku Köse, Zoltán Kovács,Blanka Kožík Lehotayová, Maria Kožuchová, Chronis Kynigos, Ilona-Elefteryja Lasica, Zsolt Lavicza, Álvaro Martínez, Efstathios Mavrotheris, Katerina Mavrou, Maria Meletiou-Mavrotheris, Georgios Papaioannou, Miroslava Pirháčová Lapšanská, Stavros Pitsikalis, Corinne Raffin, Tomás Recio, Cristina Sabena, Florian Schacht, Eva Severini, Martina Siposova, Zacharoula Smyrnaiou, Nayia Stylianidou, Osama Swidan, Christos Tiniakos, Melanie Tomaschko, Renata Tothova, Christina Vasou, and Ibolya Veress-Bágyi.
Adult Education in a Diverse and Complex World
Power has been a defining and constitutive theme of adult education scholarship for over a century and is a central concern of many of the most famous and influential thinkers in the field. Adult education has been particularly interested in how an analysis of power can be used to support transformative learning and democratic participation. In a fragile and interdependent world these questions are more important than ever. The aim of this collection is to offer an analysis of power and possibility in adult education which acknowledges, analyzes and responds to the complexity and diversity that characterizes contemporary education and society.

Power and Possibility: Adult Education in a Diverse and Complex World explores the topic of power and possibility theoretically, historically and practically through a range of perspectives and in relation to varied areas of interest within contemporary adult education. It is concerned with addressing how power works in and through adult education today by exploring what has changed in recent years and what is shaping and driving policy. Alongside this the book explores ways of theorizing learning, power and transformation that builds and extends adult education philosophy. In particular it takes up the themes of diversity and solidarity and explores barriers and possibilities for change in relation to these themes.
Academic Writing Partnerships, Groups, and Retreats
Editors: Nicola Simmons and Ann Singh
Writing comprises a significant proportion of academic staff members’ roles. While academics have been acculturated to the notion of ‘publish or perish,’ they often struggle to find the time to accomplish writing papers and tend to work alone. The result can be a sense of significant stress and isolation around the writing process. Writing partnerships, groups, and retreats help mitigate these challenges and provide significant positive writing experiences for their members.

Critical Collaborative Communities describes diverse examples of partnerships from writing regularly with one or two colleagues to larger groups that meet for a single day, regular writing meetings, or a retreat over several days. While these approaches bring mutual support for members, each is not without its respective challenges. Each chapter outlines an approach to writing partnerships and interrogates its strengths and limitations as well as proposes recommendations for others hoping to implement the practice. Authors in this volume describe how they have built significant trusting relationships that have helped avoid isolation and have led to their self-authorship as academic writers.
Origins, History and Foundations for the Future
Despite examples of vocational guidance practice being evident in Australia since the mid-1800s, there remains a spasmodic and patchwork approach to practice across the country. For decades it is a field which has been paradoxically boosted and challenged by changing economic and political agendas. Repeated international, national and State reviews emphasise the vital nature of a systemic national approach to career development, however authors repeatedly lament the lack of a sustained focus on career activity as a major national priority.

There is no broad comprehensive historical reckoning of the history of career development theory and practice in Australia since this early period. Career development theory and practice in Australia has been forged in partnership with developments in an international context. In documenting the shared history with other countries, the author significantly adds to the body of knowledge on career development as a field in Australia and internationally. The book provides new understandings about the historical development of this field of knowledge, and in particular the challenging and cyclical nature of its policy history.
A Memoir and Activities
What if, as psychologists and adult educators advocate, a person chose a life where his motivation for the work itself determined what he did? Living a Motivated Life: A Memoir and Activities follows the author through forty years, revealing how he selected vocational pursuits guided by his understanding of intrinsic motivation and transformative learning. As a compass for relevant decisions, these ideas gave energy and purpose to how he lived, and an instinct as sure as sight for the future.

Written with nuance, humor, and unpredictability, this story renders how he came to appreciate learning for the pleasure of learning. Facing similar challenges as those of today’s first generation college students, the memoir narrates his unexpected college enrollment, his friendship with an ancient history professor, and his triumphs and travails as teacher, psychologist, human relations specialist, psychotherapist, and adult educator.

This is the first memoir of someone who consciously chose to lead a professional life to experience flow on a daily basis. It is an important step in the integration and evolution of intrinsic motivation theory and transformative learning. But it reaches beyond this outcome, sharing how the author aspired to be better at what he valued and showing how he discovered and extended these ideas to others.
Potentials for a Learning Space in a Changing World
Continuity and Discontinuity in Learning Careers: Potentials for a Learning Space in a Changing World focuses on the new challenges and threats posed to adult education as a potential way out of the economic crisis and social change. It explores the role of adult education in relation to the continuity and discontinuity of the learning careers and identities of adults in a range of adult education learning contexts in Europe and beyond. The focus is on non-traditional students and issues of inequality such as class, gender, ethnicity, age, disability and how inequalities may enable or constrain their learning careers and identities.
Intersecting or Colliding Discourses for LGBTQ People?
Every day, we hear how people, organizations, and ideas are moving across borders. We also hear about fairness and justice as fundamental social values. How, though, do these two discourses—one related to internationalization and the other to equity—converge in lived experience? The post-secondary institution is one setting where that question might be asked and people who are minoritized for their gender or sexual identities can provide important answers. While equity-oriented discourses assure LGBT people that they will be free from harassment and discrimination, an internationalization discourse might call them to engage in places where they are illegal. Equity and Internationalization on Campus shares findings from a Canadian study that explored how LGBT or ally post-secondary faculty, students, and staff encountered these two discourses. It offers much to scholars and staff committed to developing an equitable version of internationalization and an international version of equity.
From Research into Practice
Adults use mathematics extensively in work even though they may deny it or dismiss their numerate behaviour as common sense. Their capacity for mathematics is invisible to them and confirms their ‘non-maths person’ self-perception, which has negative consequences for their life choices. In Adults, Mathematics and Work, the authors tackle and explain a number of paradoxes related to the curious relationship between adults and mathematics. It operationalises the benefits of workplace doctoral research by providing a set of the tools to review this mistaken self-perception in order to make workers’ abilities available for development. It also provides a systematic way of uncovering and recognising informal and non-formal learning to support employability and re-employability in an increasingly fluid work-landscape.
Research in the Field of Adult Education
Grounded in the field of adult education, this international compilation offers a range of critical perspectives on popular culture as a form of pedagogy. Its fundamental premise is that adults learn in multiple ways, including through their consumption of fiction. As scholars have asserted for decades, people are not passive consumers of media; rather, we (re)make our own meanings as we accept, resist, and challenge cultural representations.
At a time when attention often turns to new media, the contributors to this collection continue to find “old” forms of popular culture important and worthy of study. Television and movies—the emphases in this book—reflect aspects of consumers’ lives, and can be powerful vehicles for helping adults see, experience, and inhabit the world in new and different ways.
This volume moves beyond conceptually oriented scholarship, taking a decidedly research-oriented focus. It offers examples of textual and discursive analyses of television shows and films that portray varied contexts of adult learning, and suggests how participants can be brought into adult education research in this area. In so doing, it provides compelling evidence about the complexity, politics, and multidimensionality of adult teaching and learning.
Using a range of television shows and movies as exemplars, chapters relate popular culture to globalization, identity, health and health care, and education. The book will be of great use to instructors, students, and researchers located in adult education, cultural studies, women’s and gender studies, cultural sociology, and other fields who are looking for innovative ways to explore social life as experienced and imagined.
A Guide to Adult Education for Liberation
Out of over 40 years of experience in adult or worker education, David Greene brings us tools to develop consciousness and leadership for social change. Based on the power of our huge working class to understand this economic system and to organize, this book aims to empower educators, students and other workers with science applied to solving the serious social problems we face today.
We are confronted with the issues of low-wage, part-time and temporary jobs, inadequate housing, health care, and transportation, inequality and injustice, at the same time as the greatest concentration of wealth in human history. The disparity of wealth and control has never been greater. The only way out of this deepening crisis is through education. To change this we need understanding that is based on the clearest reflection of the real world. Unfit to Be a Slave employs the tools of theory and informed practice, to guide us to create spaces to share experience, study history’s lessons and develop consciousness.
As a collective and organized force we can transform our communities, our countries and our world. Mythologies that tell people, ‘Things don’t change,’ ‘We can’t do anything,’ or ‘It has always been this way,’ prevent poor and working class populations from taking necessary action on behalf of their own lives and families. Unfit to Be a Slave is meant to be a guide to education for social change.