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New digital technologies offer many exciting opportunities to educators who are looking to develop better teaching practices. When technologies are new, however, the potential for beneficial and effective implementations and applications is not yet fully recognized. This book is intended to provide teachers and researchers with a wide range of ideas from researchers working to integrate the new technology of Augmented Reality into educational settings and processes. It is hoped that the research and theory presented here can support both teachers and researchers in future work with this exciting new technology.

Contributors are: Miriam Adamková, Gilles Aldon, Panayiota Anastasi, Ferdinando Arzarello, Martina Babinská, Robert Bohdal, Francisco Botana, Constadina Charalambous, Eva Csandova, Omer Deperlioglu, Monika Dillingerová, Christos Dimopoulos, Jiri Dostal, Jihad El-Sana, Michael N. Fried, Maria Fuchsová, Marianthi Grizioti, Tomas Hlava, Markus Hohenwarter, Kateřina Jančaříková, Konstantinos Katzis, Lilla Korenova, Utku Köse, Zoltán Kovács,Blanka Kožík Lehotayová, Maria Kožuchová, Chronis Kynigos, Ilona-Elefteryja Lasica, Zsolt Lavicza, Álvaro Martínez, Efstathios Mavrotheris, Katerina Mavrou, Maria Meletiou-Mavrotheris, Georgios Papaioannou, Miroslava Pirháčová Lapšanská, Stavros Pitsikalis, Corinne Raffin, Tomás Recio, Cristina Sabena, Florian Schacht, Eva Severini, Martina Siposova, Zacharoula Smyrnaiou, Nayia Stylianidou, Osama Swidan, Christos Tiniakos, Melanie Tomaschko, Renata Tothova, Christina Vasou, and Ibolya Veress-Bágyi.
Academic Writing Partnerships, Groups, and Retreats
Editors: Nicola Simmons and Ann Singh
Writing comprises a significant proportion of academic staff members’ roles. While academics have been acculturated to the notion of ‘publish or perish,’ they often struggle to find the time to accomplish writing papers and tend to work alone. The result can be a sense of significant stress and isolation around the writing process. Writing partnerships, groups, and retreats help mitigate these challenges and provide significant positive writing experiences for their members.

Critical Collaborative Communities describes diverse examples of partnerships from writing regularly with one or two colleagues to larger groups that meet for a single day, regular writing meetings, or a retreat over several days. While these approaches bring mutual support for members, each is not without its respective challenges. Each chapter outlines an approach to writing partnerships and interrogates its strengths and limitations as well as proposes recommendations for others hoping to implement the practice. Authors in this volume describe how they have built significant trusting relationships that have helped avoid isolation and have led to their self-authorship as academic writers.
Origins, History and Foundations for the Future
Despite examples of vocational guidance practice being evident in Australia since the mid-1800s, there remains a spasmodic and patchwork approach to practice across the country. For decades it is a field which has been paradoxically boosted and challenged by changing economic and political agendas. Repeated international, national and State reviews emphasise the vital nature of a systemic national approach to career development, however authors repeatedly lament the lack of a sustained focus on career activity as a major national priority.

There is no broad comprehensive historical reckoning of the history of career development theory and practice in Australia since this early period. Career development theory and practice in Australia has been forged in partnership with developments in an international context. In documenting the shared history with other countries, the author significantly adds to the body of knowledge on career development as a field in Australia and internationally. The book provides new understandings about the historical development of this field of knowledge, and in particular the challenging and cyclical nature of its policy history.
A Tool for Collaborative Development of Work and Education
A new challenge of learning in work organizations—both in business and public administration—is to master entire life cycles of product, production and business concepts. Meeting this challenge calls—at all levels of the organization—for learning that expand the learners’ horizon and practical mastery from individual tasks up to the level of the whole system of the collective activity and its transformation. The Change Laboratory is a method for formative intervention in work communities that supports this kind of organizational learning. It is a path breaker in the area of work place learning due to its strong theoretical and research basis and the way that it integrates the change of organizational practices and individuals’ learning. It provides a way to develop practitioners’ transformative agency and capacity for creating and implementing new conceptual and practical tools for mastering their joint activity.
This first comprehensive presentation of the already widely used method is written for researchers, consultants, agricultural extension and HRD professionals, as well as practitioners involved in developing activities in their professional field. It explains this novel method as well as its theoretical basis on the Cultural Historical Activity Theory providing also practical examples and tools for carrying out a Change Laboratory intervention. A review is also provided of studies concerning various aspects of expansive learning processes in Change Laboratory interventions.
Proceedings in Vocational Education and Training
Accelerated substantial progress regarding many fields of production and services imposes pressure upon the labor market. Employers are desperately looking for skilled workers in nearly all technological fields. All over the world this pressure reaches the national systems of vocational education and training. Along with the output orientation turn new standards are imposed, forcing firms and schools to make every endeavor to improve and remodel their programs as well as their practices to reach more and more ambitious goals. To be successful they need the results of scientific research from which they demand reliable information on methods to diagnose the state and learning progress of students and on means to foster and promote competencies of heterogeneous groups of leaners. The book offers 22 state-of-the-art articles covering the central fields of vocational education and training and reporting on new and adequate ways to deal with these challenges.
This book presents an entirely new perspective on professional learning and knowledge based on perspectives on the knowledge society and in particular an interpretation of Knorr Cetina’s work on scientific ‘Epistemic cultures’. Starting with a conceptual chapter and followed by a suite of empirical studies from accountancy, education, nursing and software engineering, the book elaborates how a) how knowledge production and circulation take distinct forms in those fields? b) how the knowledge objects of practice in those fields engross and engage professionals and, in the process, people and knowledge are transformed by this engagement. By foregrounding an explicit concern for the role of knowledge in professional learning, the book goes much farther than the current fashion for describing ‘practice-based learning’. It will therefore be of considerable interest to the research, policy, practitioner and student communities involved with professional education/learning or interested in innovation and knowledge development in the professions.
This book introduces a new perspective on the knowledge economy and the learning challenge it presents for individuals, communities and societies. It demonstrates that the debate about the role of knowledge in the economy has been framed in terms of Cartesian notions of objective and subjective knowledge and human capital notions that the aim of learning is to support people to adapt to a pre-given economic reality. The book argues that these framings rest on questionable assumptions about knowledge and learning and, in the process, deflect us from asking questions about our future economic, political and social direction. Taking ideas from Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), Social Theory and the Philosophy of Mind as its starting point, the book rethinks the relation between knowledge, learning and human activity. It explores this rethinking through the form of learning—Professional, Vocational and Workplace—most closely associated with the use of knowledge for economic, political and social purposes.
There is a growing interest in understanding learning in and through work and its relationship to what is required to be learnt for effective and productive working lives. This book offers a range of emergent perspectives based on current research on learning through and for work. The common focus among these perspectives is to understand how individuals engage in and learn through their work. This includes how they learn about, manage and respond to change in their work and develop approaches and responses to learning in, through and for their working lives. The key contribution of this book is to provide insights to support learning throughout working life in order to sustain individuals’ capacities for effective, productive and enduring working lives.
Comprising 15 chapters the book offers perspectives from Finland, Germany, New Zealand and Australia and across a range of occupations and places of work. Individually and collectively these chapters make important contributions to learning about the self and agency at work and about learning work tasks.
The origins of this text were a desire to bring together the work of a group of recently completed and current doctoral candidates at Jyväskylä, Regensburg and Griffith universities. This goal has been achieved here as supported by collegiate activities among the editors, contributors and their colleagues.