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Nostalgia and the Victorian Historical Novel
Author:
Twilight Histories explores the relationship between nostalgia and the Victorian historical novel, arguing that both responded to the turbulence brought by accelerating modernisation. Nostalgia began as a pathological homesickness, its first victims seventeenth-century soldiers serving abroad. Only gradually did it become the sentimental memory we understand it as today. In a striking parallel to nostalgia’s origin, the historical novel emerged in the tumultuous early-years of the nineteenth century, at a time when the Napoleonic Wars once again set troops on the move, creating a new wave of homesick soldiers. In the historical novels of Gaskell, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot and Hardy, nostalgia offered a language in which to describe the experience of living through changing times as a homesickness for history.

Twilight Histories has been included in Oxford Bibliographies’ Historical Novel category, where it has been reviewed as “[a]n illuminating study of mid-Victorian novels of the recent past—the period of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars.”
Volume Editors: and
How do Disraeli's fictions represent, uncover and express the interplay of his roles as political theorist and practitioner, social commentator and author? Travelling well beyond his political trilogy of Coningsby (1844), Sybil (1845), and Tancred (1847), this volume examines his letters, political writings, biographies and silver fork novels, including Alroy (1833), Contarini Fleming (1832), Henrietta Temple (1837), Venetia (1837), Vivian Grey (1826) , and The Young Duke (1831).
It assesses Disraeli’s representation and analysis of political conservatism, and traces the fascinating interaction between political theory and literary representation. Bringing together studies of Disraeli and his canon by contemporary and multidisciplinary scholars of the nineteenth century and of Disraeli himself, this book provides a uniquely multifaceted collection of fresh literary, historical and political scholarship.
Volume Editors: and
Incompletion is an essential condition of cultural history, and particularly the idea of the fragment became a central element of Romantic art. Through its resistance to classicist ideals it continued being of high relevance to the various strands of modernist and contemporary aesthetics. The fourteen essays in this volume, based on the 2017 Stockholm conference of the International Association for Word and Music Studies (WMA), for the first time address incompletion in a wide range of literary and musical texts, from Baudelaire and Flaubert through Tolstoy and Henry James to Bachmann, Jelinek and Janet Frame, from Nietzsche and Chopin through Russolo and Puccini to Rihm and Kurtàg. Two further essays deal with topical general issues in the field of word and music studies.

Contributors:

Delia da Sousa Correa, The Open University, United Kingdom.
Peter Dayan, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Ivan Delazari, HSE University in St. Petersburg, Russia.
Rolf J. Goebel, The University of Alabama, USA.
Michael Halliwell, The University of Sydney, Australia.
Christin Hoene, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
Ruth Jacobs, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Lawrence Kramer, Fordham University, USA.
Bernhard Kuhn, Bucknell University, USA.
Margaret Miner, The University of Illinois Chicago, USA.
Beate Schirrmacher, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
David Francis Urrows, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong.
Laura Vattano, The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Erik Wallrup, Stockholm University, Sweden.
Werner Wolf, University of Graz, Austria.
Ecocultural Functions of Literature
Volume Editors: and
Green Matters offers a fascinating insight into the regenerative function of literature with regard to environmental concerns. Based on recent developments in ecocriticism, the book demonstrates how the aesthetic dimension of literary texts makes them a vital force in the struggle for sustainable futures. Applying this understanding to individual works from a number of different thematic fields, cultural contexts and literary genres, Green Matters presents novel approaches to the manifold ways in which literature can make a difference. While the first sections of the book highlight the transnational, the focus on Canada in the last section allows a more specific exploration of how themes, genres and literary forms develop their own manifestations within a national context. Through its unifying ecocultural focus and its variegated approaches, the volume is an essential contribution to contemporary environmental humanities.
In Pathos, Poetry and Politics in Michel Houellebecq's fiction, Russell Williams examines the literary style of France's most notorious novelist. Houellebecq is frequently the focus of debate for his provocative comments about Islam and the decline of Western civilisation. This book refocuses attention on how such provocation is an integral part of the texture of his novels.
Williams considers Houellebecq's writing about literature and outlines the key principles of the author's poetics, founded on an acute sensitivity to reading experience. He then explores Houellebecq's earliest poetry before mapping this poetic voice into his subsequent fiction, including Sérotonine (2019). Houellebecq's relationship with genre fiction and the crucial issue of the authorial persona that exists in and around his texts are also explored.
Generic Boundaries in 1930s Western Literature
Literature as Document considers the relationship between documents and literary texts in Western Literature of the 1930s. More specifically, the volume deals with the notion of the “document” and its multifaceted and complex connections to literary “texts” and attempts to provide answers to the problematic nature of that relationship. In an effort to determine a possible theoretical definition, many different disciplines have been taken into account, as well as individual case studies. In order to observe dynamics and trends, the idea for this investigation was to look at literature, taking its practices, its factual-looking and concrete applications, as a point of departure – that is to say, then, starting from the literary object itself.
Modernism, the Posthuman and the Finite
Author:
In Fantasies of Self-Mourning Ruben Borg describes the formal features of a posthuman, cyborgian imaginary at work in modernism. The book’s central claim is that modernism invents the posthuman as a way to think through the contradictions of its historical moment. Borg develops a posthumanist critique of the concept of organic life based on comparative readings of Pirandello, Woolf, Beckett, and Flann O’Brien, alongside discussions of Alfred Hitchcock, Chris Marker, Béla Tarr, Ridley Scott and Mamoru Oshii. The argument draws together a cluster of modernist narratives that contemplate the separation of a cybernetic eye from a human body—or call for a tearing up of the body understood as a discrete organic unit capable of synthesizing desire and sense perception.