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Author: Matthew Martin
In previous studies of South Asian Tantric ritual, scholars tend to focus on one region or context. For the first time, Tantra, Ritual Performance and Politics in Nepal and Kerala: Embodying the Goddess-clan offers a comparative approach to Tantric mediumship as observed in two locales: Navadurgā rituals in Bhaktapur, Nepal, and Teyyāṭṭam in North Kerala. In this book, Matthew Martin advances a new theory of ritual, which spotlights the way dancer-mediums embody medieval goddess-clans and ancestor deities, through offerings of food and sacrifice, that synchronize their denizens with the land in spiralling web-like ritual networks. Uniquely interdisciplinary in style, this study synthesizes cultural history, ethnography, and theory to explore the continuities – historical, societal, and political – that characterize these ritual traditions across the subcontinent.
Dāʿī Shīrāzī - Fāṭimids
This volume of Encyclopaedia Islamica is the sixth of a projected 16-volume set, largely consisting of an abridged and edited translation of the Persian Dāʾirat al-Maʿārif-i Buzurg-i Islāmī, one of the most comprehensive sources on Islam and the Muslim world, to which a number of original articles, written specifically for the English edition, have been added. One of the unique features of this work of reference lies in the attention it gives to Shiʿi Islam and its rich and diverse heritage, which makes it complementary to other encyclopaedias. In addition to providing entries on important themes, subjects and personages in Islam generally, it offers the Western reader an opportunity to appreciate the various dimensions of Shiʿi Islam, the Persian contributions to Islamic civilisation, and the spiritual dimensions of the Islamic tradition.

This volume contains biographical articles on a number of major Muslim scholars such as the great philosopher and polymath, Abū Naṣr Muḥammad al-Fārābī, as well as the 9th/15th-century Persian philosopher, theologician and gnostic, Jalāl al-Dīn al-Dawānī. It also includes historical surveys of important concepts in Islam, such as idaʿwa, dīn, eschatology and ethics, of religious groups such as the Druze, and of cities such as Darband, Diyār Bakr and Damascus. In terms of the traditions of Sufism, there are articles on Dārā Shukūh, al-Dasūqī, Abū al-Ḥasan al-Daylamī and Dhū al-Nūn al-Miṣrī. Diverse aspects of Persian culture, such as musicology and music history, are presented in dastgāh, dāʾira and Darwīsh Khān, while Persian social and architectural history are discussed in articles such as dihqān and the Fahraj Congregational Mosque. The volume also includes entries of considerable importance for the study of Shiʿism, such as those on Fadak and the Fāṭimid dynasty, as well as a comprehensive article on Fāṭima, the wife of Imam ʿAlī and daughter of the Prophet Muḥammad, and as such revered by all Muslims, especially the Shiʿa Muslims.

From Shamanism to Ritual Regulations and Humaneness
Author: Zehou Li
Translator: Robert A. Carleo III
Winner of the 2019 Choice Outstanding Academic Title

" The Origins of Chinese Thought offers an account of the origins and nature of a uniquely Chinese way of thinking that, carried through Confucian tradition, continues to define the character of Chinese culture and society. Li Zehou argues that vestiges of the practices of early shamanistic ritual, rationalized in ritual regulations and internalized in morals and values, continue to shape Chinese thought and relationships. This outlook and its understanding of the world, the divine, ourselves, one another, what is right and what is good differ fundamentally from other world traditions. As an alternative to modern liberalism, it offers unique resources for addressing modern Chinese—and even global—philosophic and moral issues."
The Relationship between Religion and Capitalism in Modern China
Author: Hans Derks
Probably the most fundamental relationship in human history is that of the Market versus the Oikos (= the authoritarian ruled house, family, household or the State). Its main features and elements are analysed and newly defined as are its relations with town–country antagonisms or capitalism, nation, race, religion, and so on. Because it concerns a rather universal relationship, the definitions of the relevant elements are developed over time (from ancient Greeks to Nazi contexts) and place (in the West and the East, particularly China). Max Weber is chosen as our “sparring partner,” starting with his popular analysis of the relationship of capitalism and religion in the West and of Chinese society in the East
Gyōnen’s Transmission of the Buddha Dharma in Three Countries is the first English translation of this work and a new assessment of it. Gyōnen (1240-1321) has been recognized for establishing a methodology for the study of Buddhism that would come to dominate Japan. The three countries Gyōnen considers are India, China and Japan. Ronald S. Green and Chanju Mun describe Gyōnen’s innovative doctrinal classification system ( panjiao) for the first time and compare it to other panjiao systems. They argue that Gyōnen’s arrangement and what he chose to exclude served political purposes in the Kamakura period, and thus engage current scholarship on the construction of Japanese Buddhism.
European and Global Christianity, ca. 1500-1789
Christianity was a global religion prior to the history recounted in European and Global Christianity, ca. 1500 - 1789. There were Christians in Asia and Africa before Europeans arrived in those places as well as in Latin America and North America, by movements of economic and political conquest and migration, and also Christian mission. This volume attests to the intensification of this globalization - in these 'new' continents as well as in Russia and the Ottoman territories. Simultaneously, in Europe Christianity was marked by Reformations, by confessional divisions, and by the Enlightenment. This global religion affected all structures of human life - society, politics, economics, philosophy, art, and the myriad ventures that form civilizations.

Contributors are: Carsten Bach-Nielsen, Alfons Brüning, Mariano Delgado, Andreas Holzem, Thomas Kaufman, Hartmut Lehmann, Bruce Masters, Ronnie Po-chia Hsia, Jan Stievermann and Kevin Ward.

This is part of a three volume work on the history of global Christianity. Volume II and III address the 19th and 20th centuries respectively and will appear in 2018.
Editor: Paulos Z. Huang
The Yearbook of Chinese Theology is an international, ecumenical and fully peer-reviewed annual that covers Chinese Christianity in the areas of Biblical Studies, Church History, Systematic Theology, Practical Theology, and Comparative Religions. It offers genuine Chinese theological research previously unavailable in English, by top scholars in the study of Christianity in China.

The 2017 volume highlights the five sub-disciplines of theology with contributions from: Juhong Ai, Jianming Chen & Tao Xiao, Xiaojuan Cheng, Xiangping Li, Gong Liang, Jianbo Huang, Paulos Huang, Meixiu Wang, Philip L. Wickeri, Kevin Xiyi Yao, Jie Zhao, Weichi Zhou.
Volume Editors: Michael Kemper and Ralf Elger
The Piety of Learning testifies to the strong links between religious and secular scholarship in Islam, and reaffirms the role of philology for understanding Muslim societies both past and present. Senior scholars discuss Islamic teaching philosophies since the 18th century in Nigeria, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire, Central Asia, Russia, and Germany. Particular attention is paid to the power of Islamic poetry and to networks and practices of the Tijāniyya, Rifā‘iyya, Khalwatiyya, Naqshbandiyya, and Shādhiliyya Sufi brotherhoods. The final section highlights some unusual European encounters with Islam, and features a German Pietist who traveled through the Ottoman Empire, a Habsburg officer who converted to Islam in Bosnia, a Dutch colonial Islamologist who befriended a Salafi from Jeddah, and a Soviet historian who preserved Islamic manuscripts.

Contributors are: Razaq ‘Deremi Abubakre; Bekim Agai; Rainer Brunner; Alfrid K. Bustanov; Thomas Eich; Ralf Elger; Ulrike Freitag; Michael Kemper; Markus Koller; Anke von Kügelgen; Catherine Mayeur-Jaouen; Armina Omerika; Amidu Olalekan Sanni; Yaşar Sarikaya; Rüdiger Seesemann; Shamil Sh. Shikhaliev; Diliara M. Usmanova.
Volume Editors: Nadia Sonneveld and Monika Lindbekk
Women Judges in the Muslim World: A Comparative Study of Discourse and Practice fills a gap in academic scholarship by examining public debates and judicial practices surrounding the performance of women as judges in eight Muslim-majority countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Syria, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Morocco). Gender, class, and ethnic biases are inscribed in laws, particularly in the domain of shariʿa-derived family law. Editors Nadia Sonneveld and Monika Lindbekk have carefully woven together the extensive fieldwork and expertise of each author. The result is a rich tapestry that brings out the various effects of women judges in the management of justice. In contrast to early scholarship, they convincingly prove that ‘the woman judge’ does not exist.

Contributors are: Monique C. Cardinal, Jessica Carlisle, Monika Lindbekk, Rubya Mehdi, Valentine M. Moghadam, Najibah Mohd Zin, Euis Nurlaelawati, Arskal Salim, Nadia Sonneveld, Ulrike Schultz and Maaike Voorhoeve.
Wilhelmine Imperialism, Overseas Resistance, and German Political Catholicism, 1897–1906
Author: John S. Lowry
In Big Swords, Jesuits, and Bondelswarts, John S. Lowry demonstrates that anti-imperialist resistance movements overseas significantly shaped the course of Wilhelmine domestic politics between 1897 and 1906. In 1898 and 1900, for example, the consequences of Chinese, Cuban, and Samoan resistance permitted Berlin to steer two large naval laws through the Reichstag by enabling the government to garner critical votes from the Catholic Center Party through pro-Catholic gestures overseas, rather than via repeal of the Anti-Jesuit Law at home. By contrast, after 1903 costly uprisings throughout German-occupied Africa generated acute fiscal concerns among Center Party delegates, and African civilian protests against colonial misrule aroused missionary and Centrist ire. Lowry emphasizes that the ensuing Reichstag dissolution of 1906 arose much more directly from African factors than previous scholarship has recognized.