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Volume Editors: Andreas Lammer and Mareike Jas
This volume—the proceedings of a 2018 conference at LMU Munich funded by the Fritz Thyssen Foundation—brings together, for the first time, experts on Greek, Syriac, and Arabic traditions of doxography. Fourteen contributions provide new insight into state-of-the-art contemporary research on the widespread phenomenon of doxography. Together, they demonstrate how Greek, Syriac, and Arabic forms of doxography share common features and raise related questions that benefit interdisciplinary exchange among colleagues from various disciplines, such as classics, Arabic studies, and the history of philosophy.
Volume Editors: Daniel Vázquez and Alberto Ross
The way Plato discusses time and its relation to the cosmos has puzzled and divided his readers from the very beginning. This originated rich and diverse readings that shaped and contributed to the cosmological discussion of the Hellenistic and Late Antiquity periods. Modern scholars too, have offered many and often opposed views on the matter.

This book assembles an international team of scholars to move forward the study of Plato’s conception of time, to find fresh insights for interpreting his cosmology, and to reimagine the ancient Platonic tradition.
Author: Melinda Nielsen
The medieval Latin poem Speculum Humanae Salvationis (known in English as The Mirror of Human Salvation) was one of the most popular works of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries with preachers and laity alike. Utilizing a typological approach to interpretation, it combines Old Testament and New Testament events and figures to depict an integrated narrative of redemption. As such, the Speculum is not only an outstanding model of medieval biblical interpretation, but also a fascinating case study in allegorical reading habits and the interplay between text and image. This Scholars Initiative project comprises the first modern transcription and English translation of the full Latin Speculum, accompanied by annotations tracing the biblical references and detailed notes explaining the visual iconography.
In Alfonso de Cartagena’s 'Memoriale virtutum' (1422) María Morrás and Jeremy Lawrance offer a new edition from the manuscripts of a compilation of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics addressed by the major Castilian intellectual of the day, bishop Alfonso de Cartagena, to the heir to the throne of Portugal, crown prince Duarte.
The work was a speculum principis, an education for the future king in the virtues suitable to a statesman; Cartagena’s choice of Aristotle was thus a significant index of the advent of new Renaissance ideas. This edition shows how the “memorial” throws light on the ideological transformation of society those ideas would bring, setting new ethical guidelines for the ruling class at the crossroads between medieval feudalism and Renaissance absolutism.
Ehrenstatuen in öffentlichen Räumen Siziliens vom Hellenismus bis in die Spätantike
Honores inauditi bietet erstmals eine systematische Untersuchung der Ehrenstatuen Siziliens. Vor dem Hintergrund der wechselvollen Geschichte der Insel werden die Ehrenstatuen von den ersten archäologischen Zeugnissen für Könige in der Mitte des 3. Jhs. v. Chr. über die Kaiserzeit bis zum Ende der Praxis in der Spätantike in den Blick genommen. Das archäologische und epigraphische Material weist auf eine deutliche Kontinuität hin, zeigt aber auch Veränderungen der Monumente, der Beteiligten, bei der Sprache der Inschriften und bei ihrer räumlichen Anordnung. Dieser Wandel wird in einen Kontext mit übergreifenden Entwicklungen, aber auch mit lokalen Faktoren wie Stadtgeschichte und überregionalen Handelsrouten gestellt.

Honores inauditi offers the first comprehensive study of honorary statues and their spatial and social context in Sicily. Based on a catalogue of mostly unpublished material, the book traces honorary statues throughout their historical development, starting from the first archaeologically known honorary statues erected for kings in the mid-3rd c. BC until the practice’s decline in Late antiquity. Although continuously used, various changes are detected throughout time: the monuments’ material and size, their display, the language of the inscriptions and the actors involved. These changes are contextualized by overarching developments such as trade routes, as well as local urban factors.