Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 172 items for :

  • Legal History x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In the early modern period, images of revolts and violence became increasingly important tools to legitimize or contest political structures. This volume offers the first in-depth analysis of how early modern people produced and consumed violent imagery and assesses its role in memory practices, political mobilization, and the negotiation of cruelty and justice.

Critically evaluating the traditional focus on Western European imagery, the case studies in this book draw on evidence from Russia, China, Hungary, Portugal, Germany, North America, and other regions. The contributors highlight the distinctions among visual cultures of violence, as well as their entanglements in networks of intensive transregional communication, early globalization, and European colonization.

Contributors include: Monika Barget, David de Boer, Nóra G. Etényi, Fabian Fechner, Joana Fraga, Malte Griesse, Alain Hugon, Gleb Kazakov, Nancy Kollmann, Ya-Chen Ma, Galina Tirnanic, and Ramon Voges.
In Kids Those Days, Lahney Preston-Matto and Mary Valante have organized a collection of interdisciplinary research into childhood throughout the Middle Ages. Contributors to the volume investigate childhood from Greece to the “Celtic-Fringe,” looking at how children lived, suffered, thrived, or died young. Scholars from myriad disciplines, from art and archaeology to history and literature, offer essays on abandonment and abuse, fosterage and guardianship, criminal behavior and child-rearing, child bishops and sainthood, disabilities and miracles, and a wide variety of other subjects related to medieval children. The volume focuses especially on children in the realms of religion, law, and vulnerabilities.
Contributors are Paul A. Broyles, Sarah Croix, Gavin Fort, Sophia Germanidou, Danielle Griego, Máire Johnson, Daniel T. Kline, Jenni Kuuliala, Lahney Preston-Matto, Melissa Raine, Eve Salisbury, Ruth Salter, Bridgette Slavin, and Mary A. Valante.
This volume offers new insight into key developments in the history of protection for patent rights during the period 1791-1883. The author presents a detailed examination of the underlying theoretical bases advanced for the protection of patents in various key European countries, and including new material focusing on the political rhetoric of protagonists and opponents of the patent system during the course of the patent abolitionist debates of the 1860s and 1870s. Finally, the book examines in detail the factors which prompted the movement towards international protection of patents, culminating in the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property of 1883.
The Monetary Logic of Early Medieval Conflict Resolution
Volume Editors: Lukas Bothe, Stefan Esders, and Han Nijdam
This volume offers the first comprehensive account of the monetary logic that guided the payment of wergild and blood money in early medieval conflict resolution. In the early middle ages, wergild played multiple roles: it was used to measure a person’s status, to prevent and end conflicts, and to negotiate between an individual and the agents of statehood. This collection of interlocking essays by historians, philologists and jurists represents a major contribution to the study of law and society in Western Europe during the early Middle Ages.

Contributors are Lukas Bothe, Warren Brown, Stefan Esders, Wolfgang Haubrichs, Paul Hyams, Tom Lambert, Ralph W. Mathisen, Rob Meens, Han Nijdam, Lisi Oliver, Harald Siems, Karl Ubl, and Helle Vogt.
Volume Editors: Raphael Schäfer and Anne Peters
What are the implications of writing the history of legal issues? Eighteen authors from different legal systems and backgrounds offer different answers, by examining the history writing on issues ranging from slavery over the use of force to extraterritorial jurisdiction. Contributions show how historiography has often distorted or neglected regional cultures and suggest alternative methods and approaches to history writing. These studies are highly relevant for current international relations in which the fight over master narratives is especially fierce among governments, in different academic fields, and also between governments and academics.

Contributors are: Jean d'Aspremont, Julia Bühner, Emiliano J.Buis, Maria Adele Carrai, Jacob Katz Cogan, Ríán Derrig, Angelo Dube, Michel Erpelding, Etienne Henry, Madeleine Herren, Randall Lesaffer, Anne-Charlotte Martineau, Parvathi Menon, Momchil Milanov, Hirofumi Oguri, Gustavo Prieto, Hendrik Simon, Sebastian Spitra, and Deborah Whitehall.
The thought and work of the Jesuit Francisco Suárez (1548-1617) is widely acknowledged as the culmination point of the contribution of the theologians and jurists of the so-called School of Salamanca to the development of modern Western law. This collection of studies on the legal work of Suárez explores some of his major forays into the law. Both his theoretical system-building as well as his interventions in practical questions are covered. Next to discussions on the nature of law and its different categorisations, they extend to various subbranches of the law including family law, property law, the law of obligations, criminal law and international law.

Contributors are: Dominique Bauer, Daniel Schwartz, João Manuel Azevedo Alexandrino Fernandes, Lisa Brunori, Wim Decock, Bart Wauters, Gaëlle Demelemestre, Jean-Paul Coujou, and Cintia Faraco.
Author: Jakub Wysmułek
This volume offers the first comprehensive analysis of wills in late medieval Krakow. It presents the origins of testamentary acts in the Kingdom of Poland and its centre, Krakow, and their subsequent transformation from so called ‘canonical wills’ to ‘communal wills’. Wysmułek discusses the socio-cultural role of wills and sets them in their contemporary legal, social, and economic context. In doing so, he uncovers their influence on property ownership and family relations in the city, as well as on the religious practices of the burghers. Ultimately, this work seeks to change the perception of wills by treating the testamentary act itself as an important agent of historical social change – a ‘tool of power’.
Author: Jens Iverson
In Jus Post Bellum, Jens Iverson provides the Just War foundations of the concept, reveals the function of jus post bellum, and integrates the law that governs the transition from armed conflict to peace. This volume traces the history of jus post bellum avant la lettre, tracing important writings on the transition to peace from Augustine, Aquinas, and Kant to more modern jurists and scholars. It explores definitional aspects of jus post bellum, including current its relationship to sister terms and related fields. It also critically evaluates the current state and possibilities for future development of the law and normative principles that apply to the transition to peace. Peacebuilders, scholars, and diplomats will find this book a crucial resource.