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The Apocalypse of Abraham is a pseudepigraphal work that narrates Abraham’s rejection of idol worship and his subsequent ascent to heaven, where he is shown eschatological secrets through angelic mediation. This fascinating text was only preserved in Old Church Slavonic and must be studied as both a medieval Christian and an ancient Jewish text. This monograph addresses the following questions:
-Why were medieval Slavs translating and reading Jewish pseudepigrapha?
-How much, if at all, did they emend or edit the Apocalypse of Abraham?
-When in antiquity was it most likely written?
-What were its ancient Jewish social and theological contexts?
Author: Hedda Klip
This book is the first comprehensive study completely dedicated to all biblical genealogies. It provides a form-critical analysis of these genealogies and defines basic patterns and deviations. Helpful charts guide you towards the distinctive characteristics of these patterns. The last chapter of the book summarises all genealogical information on women in their different roles as daughters, sisters, and wives. The book includes a short comparison to the presence of women in the genealogies in the Liber Antiquitatum Biblicarum.
Author: Hughson T. Ong
This book introduces sociolinguistic criticism to New Testament studies. The individual essays cover a wide range of sociolinguistic theories (multilingualism, speech communities and individuals, language and social domains, diglossia, digraphia, codeswitching, language maintenance and shift, communication accommodation theory, social identity theory, linguistic politeness theory, discourse analysis, conversation analysis, register analysis, interactional sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, etc.) that treat topics and issues pertaining to the language and sociolinguistic contexts of the New Testament, social memory, orality and literacy, and the oral traditions of the Gospels, and various texts and genres in the New Testament.
Scholarly Traditions and Rhetorical Aims in the Homilies on Genesis
Author: Samuel Pomeroy
To what extent and to what purposes did John Chrysostom engage previous models of Biblical exegesis? In this systematic study of his Homilies on Genesis, new light is shed on the precision of his adaption of works by Basil, Origen, Eusebius of Emesa, and Eusebius of Caesarea, findings set against a wider ‘web’ of parallels with various other exegetes (e.g. Ephrem, Diodore, Didymus). The cumulative picture is a network of shared knowledge across geographical and ecclesial boundaries which served as creative cache for Chrysostom’s discourses. With the metaphors of textual obscurity and word-depth, he prioritized name and word interpretations as a means of producing multiple layers of ethical evaluation.
Saint Antony of Egypt (c. 251–356), often called “the father of monasticism,” has numerous representations: the Antony of the Life of Antony and the Letters, but also the Antony of around 120 sayings or apophthegmata. This volume presents fresh English translations of the Greek and Coptic sayings, as well as the first English translation of the Copto-Arabic sayings that are based on unpublished manuscripts. The volume thus opens the door to a richer image of Saint Antony’s many identities across various languages and traditions.
Ritual Failure and Theological Innovation in Early Christianity
Author: Peter-Ben Smit
In Felix culpa: Ritual Failure and Theological Innovation in Early Christianity, Peter-Ben Smit argues that ritual developments were key to the development of early Christianity. Focusing on rituals that go wrong, he shows precisely how ritual infelicities are a catalyst for reflection upon ritual and their development in terms of their performance as well as the meaning attributed to them. Smit discusses texts from the Pauline epistles and the Gospel of Mark, and provides a chapter on Philo of Alexandria by way of contextualization in the Greco-Roman world. By stressing the importance of ritual, the present book invites a reconsideration of all too doctrinally focused approaches to early Christian communities and identities. It also highlights the embodied and performative character of what being in Christ amounted to two millennia ago.
Volume Editors: Élodie Attia and Antony Perrot
In The Hebrew Bible: A Millennium, scholars from different fields and dealing with different material sources are trying to consider the Hebrew Bible as a whole. The development of new databases and other technological tools have an increasing impact on research practices. By inviting doctoral students, young researchers, and established scholars to contribute, this interdisciplinary book showcases methods and perspectives which can support future scientific collaborations in the field of the Hebrew Bible.
This edited volume gathers relevant research from Dead Sea Scrolls Studies, Cairo Genizah Studies, European Genizah Studies, and from Late Medieval Biblical Manuscript Studies.
Author: Melinda Nielsen
The medieval Latin poem Speculum Humanae Salvationis (known in English as The Mirror of Human Salvation) was one of the most popular works of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries with preachers and laity alike. Utilizing a typological approach to interpretation, it combines Old Testament and New Testament events and figures to depict an integrated narrative of redemption. As such, the Speculum is not only an outstanding model of medieval biblical interpretation, but also a fascinating case study in allegorical reading habits and the interplay between text and image. This Scholars Initiative project comprises the first modern transcription and English translation of the full Latin Speculum, accompanied by annotations tracing the biblical references and detailed notes explaining the visual iconography.
Images of Miraculous Healing in the Early Modern Netherlands explores the ways in which paintings and prints of biblical miracles shaped viewers’ approaches to physical and sensory impairments and bolstered their belief in supernatural healing and charitable behavior. Drawing upon a vast range of sources, Kaminska demonstrates that visual imagery held a central place in premodern disability discourses, and that the exegesis of New Testament miracle stories determined key attitudes toward the sick and the poor. Addressed to middle-class collectors, many of the images analyzed in this study have hitherto been neglected by art historians.
The IOS Annual Volume 21: “Carrying a Torch to Distant Mountains”, brings forth cutting-edge studies devoted to a wide array of fields and disciplines of the Middle East. The three sections—the Ancient Near East, Semitic Languages and Linguistics, and Arabic Language and Literature—include sixteen articles. In the Ancient Near East section are studies devoted to Babylonian literature (Gabbay and Wasserman; Ayali-Darshan), history (Cohen and Torrecilla), and language (Zadok). The Semitic Languages and Linguistics section contains discussions about comparative Semitics—Egyptian and Modern South Arabic (Borg; Cerqueglini), Aramaic dialects (Khan; Stadel), Palestinian Arabic (Arnold; Procházka), and Tigre and Ethiosemitic languages (Voigt). The final section of Arabic Language and Literature is devoted to ʿArabiyya and its grammarians (Dror, Versteegh, Sheyhatovitch, Kasher, and Sadan).