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Winner of the 2019 Choice Outstanding Academic Title

Stereotypical characters that promoted the Nazi worldview were repurposed by antifascist authors in Weimar Germany, argues Dagmar C.G. Lorenz. This is the first book to trace Nazi characters through the German and Austrian literature. Until the defeat of the Third Reich, pro-Nazi literature was widely distributed. However, after the war, Nazi publications were suppressed or even banned, and new writers began to dominate the market alongside exile and resistance authors. The fact that Nazi figures remained consistent suggests that, rather than representing real people, they functioned as ideological signifiers. Recent literature and films set in the Nazi era show that “the Nazis”, ambiguous characters with a sinister appeal, live on as an established trope in the cultural imagination.
Eisenstein in New Cultural and Critical Contexts
This book of essays is quite unique in that it intervenes in a still contested area within many universities, that of the relevance of film to literature, critical theory, politics, sociology and anthropology. The essays were commissioned by Jean Antoine-Dunne whose research has explored the impact of Eisenstein’s aesthetics on different areas of modernist literature and drama. The essays in this collection use Eisenstein as a point of departure into divergent fields of analysis and are concerned with the principle of montage as a transforming idea. They gather within the pages of one work contributions from Geoffrey Nowell-Smith, Richard Taylor, Paul Willemen and emerging scholars entering and altering the field of interdisciplinary scholarship, film and literature. These hitherto unpublished essays not only extend and elaborate on previous treatments of Eisenstein and montage in areas such as semiotics, film theory, and feminist film practice, but also introduce his work to areas which have not yet been considered in relation to Eisenstein and montage, such as Beckett scholarship, Caribbean aesthetics, Third Cinema, and debates around digital imagery. No other collection of essays has explored the idea of montage as a structuring cultural and critical principle and the elasticity of Eisenstein's legacy in quite this way.