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In the history of the twentieth century, Futurism marked the birth of the avant-garde and major artistic and literary changes. Although it first appeared in Italy and Russia, it developed in Poland between 1918 and 1929. The vast documentation and texts, most of them previously unpublished, that we have brought together in this volume constitute the most complete collection ever published on Polish Futurism. A rich critical apparatus and iconography from the 1920s complete the work.

Dans l'histoire du XXe siècle, le futurisme marque la naissance des avant-gardes et des grandes mutations artistiques et littéraires. S'il apparaît d'abord en Italie et en Russie, il se développe en Pologne entre 1918 et 1929. La vaste documentation et les textes, pour la plupart inédits que nous avons réunis dans ce volume constituent l'ensemble le plus complet jamais édité sur le futurisme polonais. Un riche appareil critique et une iconographie des années 1920 complètent l'ouvrage.
Protestants, Jesuits, and British Literature in Poland–Lithuania, 1567–1775
An in-depth look at British–Polish literary pre-Enlightenment contacts, The Call of Albion explores how the reverberations of British religious upheavals in distant Poland–Lithuania surprisingly served to strengthen the impact of English, Scottish, and Welsh works on Polish literature. The book argues that Jesuits played a key role in that process. The book provides an insightful account of how the transmission, translation, and recontextualization of key publications by British Protestants and Catholics served Calvinist and Jesuit agendas, while occasionally bypassing barriers between confessionally defined textual communities and inspiring Polish–Lithuanian political thought, as well as literary tastes.
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The title concept ‘in-between’ (metaxu) refers to identity that remains in perpetual disjunction, dispersion and crisis. This book proves that ‘in-between’ is not an empty space, but a productive mode of creating new qualities, experiences, ideas and representations. The authors of individual chapters interpret selected aspects of metaxu in relevant to contemporary cultural communication areas, i.e. linguistic and more broadly semiotic, and make contemporary discourses the object of exploration. Most of the analyses are based on the Polish-language linguistic context; however, they refer to a universal perspective of culture and communication.
The development of the prosodic system from Indo-European to Balto-Slavic is dominated by two major innovations: the rise of mobility and the rise of acuteness. This book provides a new account of the latter. It stands out from previous works for being informed by recent advances in phonological typology and tonogenesis and, especially, for its comprehensiveness. All matters related to the rise of acuteness are treated in detail. As a result, the book includes new insights on several issues of Balto-Slavic historical phonology and morphology as well.
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Adam Mickiewicz (1798 – 1855) was the greatest Polish Romantic poet, and one of the great intellectual and literary figures of the first half of the 19th century in Europe. Through his verses, as well as his efforts as a scholar, lecturer, political activist and literary celebrity, he sought to bridge the gap between the Slavic nations and the culture of Western Europe. This selection of 27 poems focuses on the poems within Mickiewicz’s oeuvre which might be described as metaphysical. These original, ingenious verses explore an astonishing range of religious, mystical, philosophical, and existential themes, inviting the reader to include Mickiewicz among the most eminent figures of early European Romanticism, including Coleridge, Wordsworth and Novalis, as well the American transcendentalists. Mickiewicz’s poetry and thought are the creation of a restlessly inventive mind: his vision was unorthodox, unpredictable and ever-developing. The book presents a bilingual edition (Polish-English) with a scholarly introduction and commentary, presenting Mickiewicz as a writer in the context of his times. The co-editors of the volume are Jerzy Fiećko, one of the eminent experts in the field of Mickiewicz studies, and Mateusz Stróżyński, an internationally recognized scholar of the Platonic tradition and Western mysticism.
This book deals with the tension between a strategy of language maintenance (protecting and reinforcing the language where it is still spoken by community members) and a strategy of language revitalization (opening up access to the language to all interested people and encouraging new domains of its use). The case study presented concerns a grammar school in Upper Lusatia, which hosts the coexistence of a community of Upper Sorbian-speakers and a group of German native speakers who are learning Upper Sorbian at school. The tensions between these two groups studying at the same school are presented in this book against the background of various language strategies, practices and ideologies. The conflict of interests between the “traditional” community which perceives itself as the “guardians” of the minority language and its potential new speakers is played off on different levels by policy-makers and may be read through different levels of language policy and planning.
Yiddish-Slavic Language Contact and Its Linguistic Outcome
Yiddish, the language of Eastern-European Jews, has so far been mostly described as Germanic within the framework of the traditional, divergence-based Language Tree Model. Meanwhile, advances in contact linguistics allow for a new approach, placing the idiom within the mixed language spectrum, with the Slavic component playing a significant role. So far, the Slavic elements were studied as isolated, adstratal borrowings. This book argues that they represent a coherent system within the grammar. This suggests that the Slavic languages had at least as much of a constitutive role in the inception and development of Yiddish as German and Hebrew. The volume is copiously illustrated with examples from the vernacular language.
With a contribution of Anna Pilarski, University of Szczecin.
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This volume explores the influence of the Socratic legacy in the Russian, East European, and Soviet contexts. For writers, philosophers, and artists, Socrates has served as a potent symbol—of the human capacity for philosophical reflection, as well as the tumultuous (and often dangerous) reality in which Russian-speaking and Soviet intellectuals found themselves. The thirteen chapters include surveys of historical periods and movements (the 18th century, Nietzscheanism, and the “Greek Renaissance” of Russian culture), studies of individual writers and philosophers (Skovoroda, Herzen, Dostoevsky, Rozanov, Bely, Narbut, and many others), and investigations of Socratic subtexts (e.g., in Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita and Nosov’s Neznaika series for children). The volume concludes with a “Socratic Texts” section of new translations. The plurality of these topics demonstrates the continued relevance of the Socratic myth not only for Russian-speaking culture, but for the world.
Dolgan is a severely endangered Turkic language spoken in the extreme north of the Russian Federation which has undergone noticeable substrate influence and thus exhibits grammatical structures differing from other Turkic languages. The grammar at hand is the first fully-fledged grammar of Dolgan in English language: It describes the Dolgan language system from an internal perspective basing on corpus data of natural Dolgan speech. It takes historical, comparative and typological perspectives, if applicable, but refrains from pertaining to a particular linguistic theory. Consequently, both Turcologists and general linguists can make use of it independently from their individual research question.