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Author: Carol Chi Ngang
In The Right to Development in Africa, Carol Chi Ngang provides a conceptual analysis of the human right to development with a decolonial critique of the requirement to have recourse to development cooperation as a mechanism for its realisation. In his argumentation, the setbacks to development in Africa are not necessarily caused by the absence of development assistance but principally as a result of the lack of an operational model to steer the processes for development towards the highest attainable standard of living for the peoples of Africa. Basing on the decolonial and capability theories, he posits for a shift in development thinking from dependence on development assistance to an alternative model suited to Africa, which he defines as the right to development governance.
In this book James Nafziger covers emerging topics of cultural heritage law, a relatively new landmark in the field of both national and international law. His primary focus is on the frontiers identified and developed by the numerous work products of the International Law Association's Committee on Cultural Heritage Law, expanded and updated by some of his own writings. The construction of cultural heritage law is a good example of transnationalism at work, combining national initiatives with diplomacy, UNESCO and other intergovernmental agreements, international custom, and non-governmental initiatives such as the ILA committee's own contributions. These have included published studies, annotated principles and resolutions, draft treaties and a book focused on national practices in the international trade of cultural material. This volume concludes by briefly exploring current and future frontiers of a burgeoning range of topics that are central to many people's daily experiences and interests..
Sylvain BOLLÉE, Les pouvoirs inhérents des arbitres internationaux
Dire TLADI, The Extraterritorial Use of Force Against Non-State Actors
Volume IV: Prosecutor v. Sesay, Kallon and Gbao (The RUF Case) (Set of 3)
The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. It has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict. It completed its work in December 2013. A new Residual Special Court for Sierra Leone, based in Freetown and with offices in The Hague, has been created to carry out its essential “residual” functions.
This volume, which consists of three books and a CD-ROM and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone Court, completes the set of edited Law Reports started in 2012. Together, the Law Reports fill the gap of a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. The law reports are intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions, and anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a CD-ROM with the decisions that are reproduced in the book and the trial transcripts.
The e-book version does not.
Buy the complete set of 4 volumes (10 books in total) with a discount see isbn 978-90-04-22161-1.
The complete set consists of:
Volume 1 isbn 9789004189119 (2 books)
Volume 2 isbn 9789004221635 (2 books)
Volume 3 isbn 9789004221673 (3 books)
Volume 4 isbn 9789004221659 (3 books)
In Head of State Immunity under the Malabo Protocol: Triumph of Impunity over Accountability?, Kobina Egyir Daniel engages the subject of Head of State Immunity in international law against the backdrop of the African Union (AU)’s decision to create a Court with international criminal jurisdiction before which “Heads of State” or persons “entitled to act in such capacity” will have immunity during incumbency. The AU asserts - in justification - not only that it is standing up for itself against “neo-colonialist imperialist forces,” which have perverted international criminal justice and target African States through the International Criminal Court (ICC), but also that it is preserving the very soul of international criminal justice as well as customary international law on immunities.

Beyond the analysis to determine whether the immunity that the AU’s Malabo Protocol of 2014 confers represents a retrogression in international law norms that seek accountability for jus cogens crimes, Daniel provides valuable insights into the status-inspired dialectics and self-serving hero-villain polemics that fuel contestations of right between the AU and the ICC, and the worldviews that respectively seek to overturn/preserve the asymmetry of the international legal order. Through a review of legal history, case law from national and international tribunals, state practice and academic expositions, the book examines the evolution and practice of Head of State immunity as well as recent trends in the practice of the doctrine in light of the countervailing push to establish exceptions to immunity in order to ensure accountability under international human rights and international criminal law.
The Baltic Yearbook of International Law – the first legal journal in the field and sub fields of international law – is published under the auspices of the Baltic Editorial Board within the framework of cooperation between the Riga Graduate School of Law and Brill/Nijhoff Publishers. The Yearbook aims to bring to the international debate issues that are of importance in the Baltic States, providing a forum for views on topical international law themes from Baltic and international scholars. The first volume appeared in 2001 with a symposium on the question of the international legal status of the Baltic States.

The Yearbook contains state practice reports from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, thus serving as an important source of international law that is unavailable elsewhere. From time to time the Yearbook offers articles discussing the history of international law and current issues in Eastern Europe and the Russian Federation, thus making regional discourse more accessible to a wider global audience.

Volume 19 is devoted to the theme: Latvian tradition in international law. Concepts such as statehood, State continuity, State responsibility, equal participation in international decision-making and recently rule of law in international law and consolidation of legal regulation at an international level in different fields of cooperation, have been of relevance and interest both in practice and academic research in the field of international law in Latvia. The volume contains a selection of articles introducing historical and current research on these and other related issues.
Les obligations internationales, par P. D’ARGENT, professeur à l’Université catholique de Louvain
Malgré l’immense diversité des obligations internationales, ce cours soutient que toute obligation internationale est faite d’une combinaison de modalités extrinsèques et de modalités intrinsèques. Les modalités extrinsèques concernent les manières dont l’obligation lie son débiteur par rapport à d’autres sujets ou bénéficiaires. Les modalités intrinsèques concernent les manières dont l’obligation lie son débiteur par rapport à lui-même. En rassemblant des catégories et des notions bien établies, et en montrant en quoi leurs différentes combinaisons traversent toutes les obligations internationales, ce cours propose un outil d’analyse pour mieux en rendre compte, en en dégageant le régime général. Cet exercice a pour seule ambition d’aider les négociateurs, les juges et les praticiens à affiner leurs choix normatifs et leurs pratiques argumentatives, compte tenu des archétypes ici présentés.

Relationships Between International Criminal Law and Other Branches of International Law, by W. A. SCHABAS, Professor at Middlesex University.
After lengthy decades of relative inactivity, in recent years international criminal law has emerged to become an important branch of public international law. It has significant affinities with three other branches, international human rights law, international humanitarian law, and international refugee law. The course examines the relationships, interactions and overlaps of these different subject areas, as well as considering the place of international criminal law within general international law.
Editor: Dire Tladi
Peremptory Norms of General International Law (Jus Cogens): Disquisitions and Dispositions brings together an impressive collection of authors addressing both conceptual issues and challenges relating to peremptory norms of general international. Covered themes in the edited collection include concepts relating to the identification of peremptory norms, consequences of peremptory norms, critiques of peremptory norms, the relationship between peremptory norms and particular areas of international law as well as the peremptory status of particular norms of international law. The contributions are presented from an array of scholars and experts with different perspective, thus providing an interesting mosaic of thoughts on peremptory norms. Written against the backdrop of the ongoing work of the International Law Commission, it exposes some tensions inherent in the jus cogens.
Solidarity and Community Interests: Driving Forces for the Interpretation and Development of International Law; General Course on Public International Law by Rüdiger Wolfrum.
References to legal regimes serving the interests of the community of States have become quite frequent, less so references to regimes guided by the principle of solidarity. The General Course undertook to analyze the relevant regimes. This analysis established contours on what are the essential features of community interests and the principle of solidarity. It identified three types of community interests.
In a further step, the Course assessed as to whether the traditional international norm- making as well as its implementation system meet the challenges resulting from the dedication to community interests or to the principle of solidarity. It concludes that these regimes have had a significant impact upon the international normative order. International regimes are developed in stages; non-legally binding norms initiate and guide on a principled level such norm making. Non-legally binding norms occasionally substitute legal regimes. New actors besides States and international organizations influence the development international norms and new fora have emerged initiating norms or develop them progressively. These normative developments have had an influence on the relevant international implementation/enforcement systems. The Course identifies a clear shift from confrontational means of enforcement to non-confrontational ones.
Finally, the Course identified that the existing international dispute settlement system is only beginning to meet the challenges posed by community oriented regimes. The possibility to bring a case before an international court or tribunal is still dominated by the dogma that such action can only be brought by States, which can claim the violation of their individual interests. The International Court of Justice eroded this dogma in its Order of January 2020 concerning the dispute between The Gambia and Myanmar.
The Austrian Review of International and European Law is an annual publication that provides a scholarly forum for the discussion of issues of international and European law, with emphasis on topics of special interest for Austria. Each volume of the Review includes general articles, current developments, and the comprehensive annual digest of Austrian practice in international law, encompassing judicial decisions, executive as well as parliamentary documents relating to international law. The concluding parts of the Review contain longer book reviews and shorter book notes. Volume 24 covers 2019 and features contributions from the conference ’50 Years Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT)’