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The Yearbook of Polar Law covers a wide variety of law and policy topics relating to the Arctic and the Antarctic, and even the Third Pole. Many of the articles draw on presentations made at the annual Symposiums on Polar Law. The Editors-in-Chief are Gudmundur Alfredsson of the Stefansson Arctic Institute in Akureyri and the China University of Political Science and Law in Beijing, Julia Jabour of the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Timo Koivurova of the Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, and Akiho Shibata of the Polar Cooperation Research Centre, Kobe University.

Articles published in the Yearbook are peer reviewed, unless otherwise noted. The Yearbook will also carry book reviews and occasional news stories.

The topics covered in the Yearbook include:
- human rights issues, such as autonomy, self-government and self-determination, the rights of indigenous peoples to land and natural resources, cultural rights and cultural heritage, and indigenous traditional knowledge
- local, national and corporate governance issues
- environmental law, climate change, security and human rights implications of climate change, protected areas and species, and biodiversity
- regulatory and management agreements and arrangements for marine environments, marine mammals, fisheries conservation and other biological/mineral/oil resources
- jurisdictional and other issues re the exploration, exploitation and shipping of oil, gas and minerals
- law of the sea, the retreating sea ice, and continental shelf claims
- trade law, potential shipping lines through the northwest and northeast passages, maritime law and transportation law
- territorial claims and border disputes on both land and at sea
- peace and security, and dispute settlement
- the roles and actual involvement of international organizations in the polar regions, such as the Arctic Council, the Nordic Council, the International Whaling Commission, the European Union, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and the United Nations, and
- the activities of NGOs, think tanks and academic institutions

The papers in this volume are principally based on presentations at the Polar Law Symposium, held online with logistical support by the Kobe University Polar Cooperation Research Centre (PCRC), in November 2020.
The Legal Regulation of Environmental Crime - The International and European Dimension provides a comprehensive analysis of the international and EU legal regimes for tackling environmental crime. The book includes an in-depth analysis of the major international legal conventions as they relate to the regulation of environmental crime (CITES, Basel, MARPOL) and provides a holistic overview of the evolution and content of EU law in the field of environmental crime, covering substantive criminal law harmonisation, judicial cooperation and the role of EU criminal justice bodies and agencies (Europol, Eurojust and the EPPO) in fighting environmental crime. Further, global experts address key recent policy and legislative developments in the field and offers a timely contribution to legal reform in view of the forthcoming publication of new proposals on legislation on environmental crime at EU level.
Editors: Liu Xiaonan and Wang Liwan
In Equality and Anti-Discrimination: The Road to Equal Rights in China, Professors Liu Xiaonan and Wang Liwan collect experienced scholars in the field of anti-discrimination law to conduct deep discussions on the manifestations, causes, and solutions of discrimination issues in China. Since the reform and opening up in China the market economy and civil society have developed. However, many economic and social discriminations have also emerged and caused widespread social contradictions and legal dilemmas. In this book, equality rights and discrimination issues are investigated in a panoramic way from the perspective of law, and .insightful suggestions are made.
The authors believe that anti-discrimination research and actions in the field of Chinese law are carried out simultaneously with political changes and economic development. In this process, experts and scholars, public media, research institutions, and non-governmental organizations play important roles. The awakening of civil rights awareness and the emergence of rights protection actions for vulnerable groups are the sources of anti-discrimination research and actions in the field of law.
With over 40 million people still enslaved around the world, this book takes a closer look at the role of culture in society and how certain practices, beliefs or behaviors may be fueling human trafficking beyond what the law can curtail. The study reveals cultural elements that conflict with existing anti-human trafficking laws across three case studies (United States, India and Costa Rica). There is no simple answer or a single solution to stop or significantly reduce the crime, but a pragmatic, multi-disciplinary, and human rights approach to the problem may bring to light that, efforts to curtail human trafficking will be in vain if we rely on law alone. A fundamental shift in culture is imperative.
During the Covid-19 pandemic, the home as a workplace became a widely discussed topic. However, for almost 300 million workers around the world, paid work from home was not news. Home-Based Work and Home-Based Workers (1800-2021) includes contributions from scholars, activists and artists addressing the past and present conditions of home-based work. They discuss the institutional and legal histories of regulations for these workers, their modes of organization and resistance, as well as providing new insights on contemporary home-based work in both traditional and developing sectors.

Contributors are: Jane Barrett, Janine Berg, Eloisa Betti, Chris Bonner, Eileen Boris, Patricia Coñoman Carrilo, Janhavi Dave, Saniye Dedeoğlu, Laura K Ekholm, Jenna Harvey, Frida Hållander, K. Kalpana, Srabani Maitra, Indrani Mazumdar, Gabriela Mitidieri, Silke Neunsinger, Malin Nilsson, Narumol Nirathron, Åsa Norman, Leda Papastefanaki, Archana Prasad, Maria Tamboukou, Nina Trige Andersen, and Marlese von Broembsen.
This book comprehensively covers the entire scope of conflicting rights and duties of the fighting parties and international humanitarian relief actors in non-international armed conflicts, namely from the moment of the initiation of international humanitarian relief actions till their authorisation and throughout the consecutive stages of the delivery of relief. From the practice of frontline humanitarian negotiations, this book reconceptualizes how those rights and duties are coming into being and how compliance with agreements on humanitarian access and other international humanitarian law and international human rights norms can be ensured and/or their normativity can be strengthened.