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Volume Editors: Marzena Zawanowska and Mateusz Wilk
King David if one of the most central figures in all of the major monotheistic traditions. He generally connotes the heroic past of the (more imagined than real) ancient Israelite empire and is associated with messianic hopes for the future. Nevertheless, his richly ambivalent and fascinating literary portrayal in the Hebrew Bible is one of the most complex of all biblical characters.
This volume aims at taking a new, critical look at the process of biblical creation and subsequent exegetical transformation of the character of David and his attributed literary composition (the Psalms), with particular emphasis put on the multilateral fertilization and cross-cultural interchanges among Jews, Christians and Muslims.
After decades of controversy, there is now a growing consensus that Greek warfare was not singular and simple, but complex and multiform. In this volume, emerging and established scholars build on this consensus to explore Greek warfare beyond its traditional focus on hoplites and the phalanx. We expand the chronological limits back into the Iron Age, the geographical limits to the central and eastern Mediterranean, and the operational limits to include cavalry, light-armed troops, and sieges. We also look beyond the battlefield at integral aspects of warfare including religion, the experiences of women, and the recovery of the war dead.
This volume, the 36th year of published proceedings, contains five papers and four commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during the academic year 2019–20. Paper topics: On Platonism, how Plato’s Cave preserves his political interest from Arendt’s critique, and how Plutarch’s Isis and Osiris uses a complex framing device to integrate Platonic metaphysics and politics. On Aristotle, that dialectic is a versatile techne for formal and informal discussion, and the role of practice to preserve the voluntary nature of character despite its grounding in upbringing. Finally, using Aristotle to argue for the legitimacy of anger against transhumanist efforts, echoing Stoic concerns against such emotions. The comments challenge or sustain the theses presented in the main papers.
Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Volume 2, ب to بين. Second, Revised Edition
From the 8th to the 10th century AD, Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic, sometimes through the mediation of Syriac. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first attempt to present in a systematic and rationalized way, with full analysis of the categories describing the grammar of translation, the vocabulary of these translations as each term appears in context, fully cited. It is an indispensable reference tool for the study and understanding of Arabic scientific and philosophical language and literature and its grammar, the vocabulary of Classical and Middle Greek, the transmission of the text of classical Greek works and their reception in late antiquity and Byzantium, and the reception and translation of the Arabic literature based on them in Byzantine Greek. Fully indexed, this second edition of the work supersedes the first with enhanced precision and breadth of coverage and user-friendly philological analysis.
Permitting and Forbidding Open Inquiry in 12-15th Century Europe and North Africa
Author: Yehuda Halper
Yehuda Halper examines Jewish depictions of Socrates and Socratic questioning of the divine among European and North African Jews of the 12th-15th centuries. Without direct access to Plato, their understanding of Socrates is indirect, based on legendary material, on fragmentary quotations from Plato, or on Aristotle. Out of these sources, Jewish authors of this period formed two distinct views of Socrates: one as a wise, ascetic, monotheist, and the other as a vocal skeptic. The latter view has its roots in Plato's Apology where Socrates describes his divine mandate to question all knowledge, including knowledge of the divine. After exploring how this and similar questions arise in the works of Judah Halevi and the Hebrew Averroes, Halper traces how such open-questioning of the divine arises in the works of Maimonides, Jacob Anatoli, Gersonides, and Abraham Bibago.