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Editor: Myint Swe Khine
Assessment and evaluation have always been an integral part of the educational process. Quality and purposeful assessment can assist in students’ learning and their achievement. In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the roles of educational measurement, evaluation, and assessment with a view to improving the education systems throughout the world. Educators are interested in how to adequately prepare the young generation to meet the ever-growing demands of the 21st century utilizing robust assessment methods. There has also been increased demand in accountability and outcomes assessment in schools to bridge the gap between classroom practices and measurement and assessment of learners’ performance. This volume contains selected and invited papers from the First International Conference on Educational Measurement, Evaluation and Assessment (ICEMEA).

Contributors are: Peter Adams, Derin Atay, Nafisa Awwal, Helen Barefoot, Patrick Griffin, Bahar Hasirci, Didem Karakuzular, Don Klinger, Leigh Powell, Vicente Reyes, Mark Russell, Charlene Tan, Bryan Taylor, and Zhang Quan.
Conceptualising and Evaluating Innovative Learning Environments
School Space and its Occupation addresses the ongoing and pressing need for justification of education and environmental innovation. Further, the increasingly important work of evaluating the new learning spaces brings attention to the need for conceptual and methodological clarity.

The editors have assembled a collection of leading authors to explore the links between education and design, progression of ideas in education and architecture, as well as making sense of pedagogical trends and spatial and design relevance. Post-occupancy evaluation is capable of informing both educational and architectural questions to generate sustainable adaptations for educators and designers. Part 2 focuses on the occupancy phase and examines the lived experience of schools to draw conclusions and make recommendations focused impacts and methodological progression.

Contributors: Renae Acton, Scott Alterator, Benjamin Cleveland, Craig Deed, Matthew Dwyer, Debra Edwards, Neil Gislason, Wesley Imms, Peter Lippman, Elizabeth Matthews, Marcus Morse, Vaughan Prain, Matthew Riddle, Warren Sellers, Rebecca Townsend, and Adam Wood.
A rich array of social and cultural theories constitutes a solid foundation that affords unique insights into teaching and learning science and learning to teach science. The approach moves beyond studies in which emotion, cognition, and context are often regarded as independent. Collaborative studies advance theory and resolve practical problems, such as enhancing learning by managing excess emotions and successfully regulating negative emotions. Multilevel studies address a range of timely issues, including emotional energy, discrete emotions, emotion regulation, and a host of issues that arose, such as managing negative emotions like frustration and anxiety, dealing with disruptive students, and regulating negative emotions such as frustration, embarrassment, disgust, shame, and anger. A significant outcome is that teachers can play an important role in supporting students to successfully regulate negative emotions and support learning.

The book contains a wealth of cutting edge methodologies and methods that will be useful to researchers and the issues addressed are central to teaching and learning in a global context. A unifying methodology is the use of classroom events as the unit for analysis in research that connects to the interests of teacher educators, teachers, and researchers who can adapt what we have done and learned, and apply it in their local contexts. Event-oriented inquiry highlights the transformative potential of research and provides catchy narratives and contextually rich events that have salience to the everyday practices of teachers, teacher educators, and researchers. Methods used in the research include emotion diaries in which students keep a log of their emotions, clickers to measure in-the-moment emotional climate, and uses of cogenerative dialogue, which caters to diverse voices of students and teachers.