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The Need for Critical Media Literacy in Teacher Education
Critical media literacy is a necessary part of young people’s education and can foster the space for a more thoroughly informed and involved citizenry. In order to make critical media literacy sustainable in K-12 classrooms, learning and application of it must begin with teachers, preferably during their formal schooling. Educating Media Literacy is a manifesto for the inclusion of media literacy in teacher education and, by extension, in K-12 classrooms. Through a discussion of critical media literacy’s aims and the role of teacher education in the United States, this book argues for the inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education.

Educating Media Literacy addresses two separate topics – teacher education and media literacy – and illustrates how they are intertwined: The United States struggles simultaneously with how best to train and retain prospective teachers and how to foster a better understanding of mainstream media. These two struggles can join forces and move towards a solution through the following: The inclusion of critical media literacy in teacher education programs.
Relevant Prose and Postscripts
Teachers are not automatons. An educator’s personal values, concerns, and aspirations cannot be cleaved from one’s professional life without impacting the quality and relevance of the teaching experience. This book examines spaces where the personal and professional intersect, thereby deepening our understanding of the nuances and complexities of a teacher’s work. It draws readers into places of vulnerability—moments of grieving. As a teacher’s curriculum—as a curriculum of life—grief has much to teach about sympathy, compassion, and resilience.

Educational philosophy, literary analysis, and reflective practice are used to explore ways grief can help us better ascertain the scope and depth of the educators we are and have the potential to become. Pieces of literature used include works by Pat Conroy, Charles Dickens, Stephen King, Rabindranath Tagore, Virgil, Franz Wedekind, and Virginia Woolf. Also included are ideas from a diverse set of educational philosophers, social and cultural commentators, poets, and more. Chapters conclude with "Topics for Reflection" for further individual and/or collective reflection and discourse.

Educators at all stages of their careers will benefit from this study that demonstrates the impact personal grieving can have on remembering, recovering, and reidentifying with one’s mission and vision. As a resource for pre-service or veteran teachers, the text celebrates the power of introspection to transform our work, our lives, and the lives of our students. It is equally relevant for parents, coaches, mentors, and anyone who takes on the kinds of teacher roles that impact, nourish, and inspire the lives of others.

Living Culturally Responsive Mathematics Education with/in Indigenous Communities explores challenges and possibilities across international contexts, involving Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholars, teachers and Elders responding to calls for improved education for all Indigenous students. Authors from Australia, New Zealand, United States, Micronesia, and Canada explore the nature of culturally responsive mathematics education. Chapters highlight the importance of relationships with communities and the land, each engaging critically with ideas of culturally responsive education, exploring what this stance might mean and how it is lived in local contexts within global conversations. Education researchers and teacher educators will find a living pathway where scholars, educators, youth and community members critically take-up culturally responsive teachings and the possibilities and challenges that arise along the journey.

Contributors are: Dayle Anderson, Dora Andre-Ihrke, Jo-ann Archibald Q'um Q'um Xiiem, Maria Jose Athie-Martinez, Robin Averill, Trevor Bills, Beatriz A. Camacho, A. J. (Sandy) Dawson, Dwayne Donald, Herewini Easton, Tauvela Fale, Amanda Fritzlan, Florence Glanfield, Jodie Hunter, Roberta Hunter, Newell Margaret Johnson, Julie Kaomea, Robyn Jorgensen, Jerry Lipka, Lisa Lunney Borden, Dora Miura, Sharon Nelson-Barber, Cynthia Nicol, Gladys Sterenberg, Marama Taiwhati, Pania Te Maro, Jennifer S. Thom, David Wagner, Evelyn Yanez, and Joanne Yovanovich.
A Tapestry of Ideas and Inquiries
Since the turn of the 21st century, developing teachers’ assessment literacy has been recognized as one of the key levers for improving instructional practice and student learning in light of the education reforms worldwide. A substantial body of literature is focused on teachers’ assessment literacy or teachers’ capacity in assessment, and teachers’ continuing professional development in assessment. As we approach the third decade of the 21st century, developing teachers’ assessment literacy needs to be more responsive to the need of both preservice and inservice teachers who come from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds. The authors concur that both preservice and inservice teachers in today’s complex educational contexts require a deeper level of understanding of assessment. Additionally, teachers are highly encouraged to appreciate the history of educational assessment in different sociocultural and political contexts, as well as to know how to determine the merits of a range of assessment practices best suited for their lesson planning and classroom teaching. In this book, the authors discuss significant aspects of developing teachers’ assessment literacy in different sociocultural and political contexts. Based on their respective educational backgrounds, academic experiences, and applied fields of study, each of the authors presents a critical response to the topic of assessment. Their accounts represent the complexity of the subject through a breadth and range of content and perspectives. By expanding the terms of reference regarding assessment, the authors have developed a book with a far richer panorama on assessment as a springboard for inquiry.
Original Essays about Educators in Popular Culture
Popular representations of teachers and teaching are easy to take for granted precisely because they are so accessible and pervasive. Our lives are intertextual in the way lived experiences overlap with the stories of others presented to us through mass media. It is this set of connected narratives that we bring into classrooms and into discussions of educational policy. In this day and time—with public education under siege by forces eager to deprofessionalize teaching and transfer public funds to benefit private enterprises—we ignore the dominant discourse about education and the patterns of representation that typify educator characters at our peril.

This edited volume offers a fresh take on educator characters in popular culture and also includes important essays about media texts that have not been addressed adequately in the literature previously. The 15 chapters cover diverse forms from literary classics to iconic teacher movies to popular television to rock ‘n’ roll. Topics explored include pedagogy through the lenses of gender, sexuality, race, disability, politics, narrative archetypes, curriculum, teaching strategies, and liberatory praxis. The various perspectives represented in this volume come from scholars and practitioners of education at all levels of schooling. This book is especially timely in an era when public education in the United States is under assault from conservative political forces and undervalued by the general public.

Contributors are: Steve Benton, Naeemah Clark, Kristy Liles Crawley, Elizabeth Currin, Mary M. Dalton, Jill Ewing Flynn, Chad E. Harris, Gary Kenton, Mark A. Lewis, Ian Parker Renga, Stephanie Schroeder, Roslin Smith, Jeff Spanke, and Andrew Wirth.
Why Does the Future Need Educational Poetics?
In Time for Educational Poetics the author addresses a discussion in the context of today’s philosophy of education and educational research. Conceptually, educational poetics is not limited to a theoretical construction, but rather focuses on the creative, imaginative and poetic experience, to being recreated in the teaching-learning process.

Educational poetics is rooted in the philosophical and aesthetic thought of South Asia, specifically in how contemplative and creative practices re-introduced by Rabindranath Tagore. Educational poetics is the convergence of research in creative contemplation and poetic creation, practices of conscious attention and mindfulness, and practices of peace education and philosophy of non-violence. This book leads to a perspective in thinking about the risks that jeopardize the future of young generations.
The canon, as much an ideology as it is a body of texts perceived to be intrinsic to the high school English classroom, has come under scrutiny for maintaining status quo narratives about whiteness, masculinity, heterosexuality, ability, and even those associated with American ideals of self-reliance, the good life, and the self-made man. Teaching practices around these texts may also reinforce harmful practices and ways of thinking, including those connected to notions of culture, literary merit, and methods of reading, teaching, and learning.

Teaching the Canon in 21st Century Classrooms offers innovative, critical ways of reading, thinking about, and teaching canonical texts in 21st century classrooms. Responding to the increasingly pluralized, digitized, global 21st century English classroom, chapter authors make explicit the ideologies of a canonical text of focus, while also elaborating a pedagogical approach that de-centers the canon, bridges past and present, applies critical theory, and celebrates the rich identities of 21st century readers. In using this book, teachers will be especially poised to take on the canon in their classroom and, thus, to open up their curricula to ideas, values, concerns, and narratives beyond those embedded in the canonical texts.
A Study of Five English as a Foreign Language (EFL) High School Teachers
Resisting English Hegemony examines personal and educational English as a Foreign Language (EFL) journey of five public high school teachers and the ways they manifest their pedagogical practices to develop their students’ skills in the English language. This research explores history of EFL in pre and post-communist Poland, EFL teachers’ testimonies, methodologies and tools available for educators interested in EFL theories having roots in research and hands on experience in the EFL learning/teaching field. The research also focuses the development of students’ speaking, communicative, and cooperative skills in post-communist Poland, in the era of Poland’s membership in the European Union, and the era of widespread technology, Internet accessibility, visualization and globalization. The data for this study was collected over three months, and includes classroom observations and personal interviews with the study participants. The data from each participant was compared with the rest of the participants, and the analysis was done through drawing commonalities among their experiences and ways of teaching English as a Foreign Language.
Teacher Candidates Share Their Experiences through Narrative
By applying an auto-ethnographic approach in this volume to share and explore the experiences of prospective teachers as they navigate the preparation and credentialing processes of teacher education, we – as those who have gone before the future educators in this text and those who will come behind them, gain first hand insights from these young women and men about what it means and how to better prepare prospective educators to become a teacher against a backdrop of historical inequities in schooling and prepared for the multi-culturally diverse classrooms of today. Teacher educators, school and community leaders, and others committed to pushing toward more equitable social domains and forms of living and learning hence would do well to take up the opportunity provided in this text to learn from the narratives included in this volume and those of other teacher candidates; indeed, the narratives of teacher candidates herein and elsewhere are, in part, reflections of ourselves as teacher educators and evaluations of our work in teacher education and the professional preparation of those who will carry on our professions after us and for rising generations. What we as teacher educators teach, or think we are teaching, in teacher preparation courses may, or may not, be what prospective teachers are learning about being a teacher and successful teaching and learning for all learners, particularly those students historically underserved.

Each of the prospective educators who share their narratives in this volume are striving to become critical educators capable of promoting equitable educational and social opportunities, outcomes, and experiences for all learners. While their journeys are each distinctive and unique to them personally, the teacher candidates who share their narratives in this volume highlight some of the challenges and opportunities they have encountered in teacher preparation courses to learn about the functioning of social structures that sustain society’s existing hierarchies and develop the skills and knowledge requisite to identify, implement, and assess critical learning strategies aimed at challenging inequities and promoting more inclusive forms of education. Specifically, these future teachers included in this volume are sharing with us, their readers, their attempts at learning to unhook from Whiteness and to disrupt the pernicious and historical school-to-prison pipeline that has long existed in the US between the nation’s prison system and schools serving learners and their families and communities identified as racially not White, economically poor, and otherwise not members of the White, middle-class, primary English speaking, heterosexual, patriarchal mainstream.
A Case Study of London English Teaching (1965–1975)
In Developing Professional Memory, the author examines narratives from ‘progressive’ and ‘radical’ London-based English teachers who began their careers between 1965 and 1975. English teaching in this period, which the author defines as a ‘cauldron’ of competing and contested currents, is often portrayed negatively in dominant discourses around the subject. The teachers’ narratives, however, provide a much more nuanced and positive story.

By recovering and documenting the collective Professional Memory of English teachers in a particular conjuncture, this volume offers a compelling practitioner account of events and developments and proves that learning from Professional Memory has transformative potential. The author argues that by critically confronting narratives, practices and existing conjunctural circumstances, current practitioners might develop greater agency in debates around their professional roles and responsibilities.