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Leveraging the Power of Education Data
Editor: Myint Swe Khine
The term 'learning analytics' is defined as the measurement, collection, analysis, and reporting of information about learners and their contexts for the purposes of understanding and optimizing learning. In recent years learning analytics has emerged as a promising area of research that trails the digital footprint of the learners and extracts useful knowledge from educational databases to understand students’ progress and success. With the availability of an increased amount of data, potential benefits of learning analytics can be far-reaching to all stakeholders in education including students, teachers, leaders, and policymakers. Educators firmly believe that, if properly harnessed, learning analytics will be an indispensable tool to enhance the teaching-learning process, narrow the achievement gap, and improve the quality of education.

Many investigations have been carried out and disseminated in the literature and studies related to learning analytics are growing exponentially. This book documents recent attempts to conduct systematic, prodigious and multidisciplinary research in learning analytics and present their findings and identify areas for further research and development. The book also unveils the distinguished and exemplary works by educators and researchers in the field highlighting the current trends, privacy and ethical issues, creative and unique approaches, innovative methods, frameworks, and theoretical and practical aspects of learning analytics.

Contributors are: Arif Altun, Alexander Amigud, Dongwook An, Mirella Atherton, Robert Carpenter, Martin Ebner, John Fritz, Yoshiko Goda, Yasemin Gulbahar, Junko Handa, Dirk Ifenthaler, Yumi Ishige, Il-Hyun Jo, Kosuke Kaneko, Selcan Kilis, Daniel Klasen, Mehmet Kokoç, Shin'ichi Konomi, Philipp Leitner, ChengLu Li, Min Liu, Karin Maier, Misato Oi, Fumiya Okubo, Xin Pan, Zilong Pan, Clara Schumacher, Yi Shi, Atsushi Shimada, Yuta Taniguchi, Masanori Yamada, and Wenting Zou.
Homeostasis and Novelty in Teaching and Learning
In this book the editors consider the resistance to change among teachers and learners despite all the evidence that science participation brings benefits for both individuals and nations. Beginning with biology, Stability and Change in Science Education: Meeting Basic Learning Needs explores this balance in teaching and learning science. The authors reflect upon this equilibrium as they each present their work and its contribution.

The book provides a wide range of examples using the change/stability lens. Authors from the Netherlands, Israel, Spain, Canada and the USA discuss how they observe and consider both homeostasis and novelty in theory, projects and other work. The book contains examples from science educators in schools and in other science rich settings.

Contributors are: Lucy Avraamidou, Ayelet Baram-Tsabari, Michelle Crowl, Marilynne Eichinger, Lars Guenther, Maria Heras, Phyllis Katz, Joy Kubarek, Lucy R. McClain, Patricia Patrick, Wolff-Michael Roth, Isabel Ruiz-Mallen, Lara Smetana, Hani Swirski, Heather Toomey Zimmerman, and Bart Van de Laar.
A Study of Five English as a Foreign Language (EFL) High School Teachers
Resisting English Hegemony examines personal and educational English as a Foreign Language (EFL) journey of five public high school teachers and the ways they manifest their pedagogical practices to develop their students’ skills in the English language. This research explores history of EFL in pre and post-communist Poland, EFL teachers’ testimonies, methodologies and tools available for educators interested in EFL theories having roots in research and hands on experience in the EFL learning/teaching field. The research also focuses the development of students’ speaking, communicative, and cooperative skills in post-communist Poland, in the era of Poland’s membership in the European Union, and the era of widespread technology, Internet accessibility, visualization and globalization. The data for this study was collected over three months, and includes classroom observations and personal interviews with the study participants. The data from each participant was compared with the rest of the participants, and the analysis was done through drawing commonalities among their experiences and ways of teaching English as a Foreign Language.
"In this 21st century, technological and social changes have never been as rapid as before, and educative practices must evolve and innovate to keep up. What is being done by educators today to prepare future global citizens? What are the skills and competencies that will be required by our students? What changes in how we approach education might need to be made?
This book presents a modern focus on some significant issues in teaching, learning, and research that are valuable in preparing students for the 21st century. The book discusses these issues in four sections. The first section presents contemporary, innovative curriculum and pedagogical practices that are relevant for the 21st century. This also includes how social networking has an integrated role within current educative practice. The next section then explores issues and current research around motivation and engagement, and how these are changing in this era of technological and social change. The third section presents debates around inclusion and social contexts, both global and local. Finally, the fourth section explores current discourses in regard to internationalisation and globalisation and how these are being considered in educational research.
The book is an important representation of some of the work currently being done for these rapidly changing times.
This graphic novel is about pedagogy. It is not a work of fiction. Rather, this is a representation of the critical encounters between two teacher educators, twelve pre-service teachers and thirteen Year 8 and Year 9 secondary students as they consider what it means to learn to teach. Situated in a government high school over a one-year period, high school students were asked to take on the role of mentors to a cohort of primary and secondary pre-service teachers as issues of teaching/learning and curriculum/assessment were explored. The graphic novel is drawn from actual data: fragments from journals, letters, emails, photographs, drawings, and field notes from an ethnographic research project. The reader is brought into a ‘classroom’ and acquainted with the often tangled and fragmented nature of living pedagogy. In this way the discourses of identity and power, practices of schooling, and the wonder of praxis are made visible and open to scrutiny. It brings to life stories of learning to teach and learning to learn.
A Primer on Doing Authentic Inquiry Research on Teaching and Learning
Using a sociocultural approach to critical action research, this book is a primer in doing reflexive, authentic inquiry research in teaching and learning for educators as teacher | researchers. Rather than the artificial dichotomy between theory and practice, the roles of teacher and researcher are instead seen in a dialectic relationship (indicated by the symbol “|” in teacher | researcher) in which each informs and mediates the other in the process of revising and generating new knowledge that is of benefit to those being researched.
In addition to providing a theoretical foundation for authentic inquiry, Being a Teacher | Researcher provides a detailed framework with ideas and strategies that interested educators can apply in exploring teaching and learning in both formal and informal settings. It provides concrete examples of how to use authentic inquiry as a basis for collaborating with others to improve the quality of teaching and learning while cogenerating new theory and associated practices that bridge what has been described as a theory-practice divide. Included in this book are how to plan and carry out authentic inquiry studies, choosing appropriate methodologies, methods of data collection and analysis, negotiating research with human participants, using authenticity criteria and characteristics, and addressing challenges and conflicts for teacher | researchers.
How can widely acknowledged challenges facing regional secondary schools with high concentrations of low SES students, ineffectual curricula, and poor levels of student engagement, attendance, and wellbeing, be addressed? In this book we report on key outcomes of the Bendigo Education Plan that aimed to improve the academic attainment and wellbeing of 3000 regional secondary students. This Plan entailed rebuilding four Years 7-10 colleges, and developing a differentiated and personalised curriculum, with teachers team-teaching in open-plan settings. We analyse how and why teachers and students adapted to these new practices. We focus on both generic changes in the schools, around the use of ICTs and the organisation of the curriculum, and on specific approaches to teaching and learning in English, mathematics, science, social studies and studio arts. This book provides research-based guidelines on how the curriculum can be renewed and enacted effectively in these and like schools.
In analysing a large-scale attempt to address the challenge of making learning personalised and meaningful for this cohort of students, our book addresses larger questions about quality secondary curriculum and successful teacher professional learning support.
Peer Review of Teaching in Higher Education
Teaching for Learning and Learning for Teaching focuses on the emerging global governmental and institutional agenda about higher education teaching quality and the role that peer review can play in supporting improvements in teaching and student outcomes. This agenda is a pervasive element of the further development of higher education internationally through activities of governments, global agencies, institutions of higher education, discrete disciplines, and individual teachers. Many universities have adopted student evaluations as a mechanism to appraise the quality of teaching. These evaluations can be understood as providing a “customer-centric” portrait of quality; and, when used as the sole arbiter of teaching performance they do not instil confidence in the system of evaluation by academic teaching staff. Providing peer perspectives as counterpoint, whether in a developmental or summative form, goes some way to alleviating this imbalance and is the impetus for the resurgence of interest in peer review and observation of teaching. This book seeks to recognise cases of peer review of teaching in Higher Education to affirm best practices and identify areas that require improvement in establishing local, national and international benchmarks of teaching quality.
In recent years many countries have built or renovated schools incorporating open plan design. These new spaces are advocated on the basis of claims that they promote fresh, productive ways to teach and learn that address the needs of students in this century, resulting in improved academic and well-being outcomes. These new approaches include teachers planning and teaching in teams, grouping students more flexibly, developing more coherent and comprehensive curricula, personalising student learning experiences, and providing closer teacher-student relationships. In this book we report on a three-year study of six low SES Years 7—10 secondary schools in regional Victoria, Australia, where staff and students adapted to these new settings. In researching this transitional phase, we focused on the practical reasoning of school leaders, teachers and students in adapting organisational, pedagogical, and curricular structures to enable sustainable new learning environments. We report on approaches across the different schools to structural organisation of students in year-level groupings, distributed leadership, teacher and pre-service teacher professional learning, student advocacy and wellbeing, use of techno-mediated learning, personalising student learning experiences, and curriculum design and enactment.
We found that these new settings posed significant challenges for teachers and students and that successful adaptation depended on many interconnected factors. We draw out the implications for successful adaptation in other like settings.