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They’re Called the “Throwaways”

Children in Special Education Using Artmaking for Social Change

Edited by Christa Boske

School communities identified these children as the “throwaways”-children who often experienced bullying, abuse, foster care, juvenile detention, and special education services. In this book, children with learning differences engage in artmaking as sensemaking to deepen their understanding of what it means to live on the margins in U.S. public K-12 schools. Their artmaking calls upon educators, school leaders, and policymakers to actively engage in addressing the injustices many of the children faced in school. This book is revolutionary. For the first time, children with learning differences, teachers, staff, and school leaders come together and share how they understand the role artmaking as sensemaking plays in empowering disenfranchised populations. Together, they encourage school community members to examine pedagogical practices, eliminate exclusive policies, and promote social justice-oriented work in schools. Their artmaking inspires new ways of knowing and responding to the lived experiences of children with learning differences. They hope their work encourages school communities to make authentic connections to improve their learning, capacity to love others, and of most importantly, to value oneself. Authors’ first-tellings capture the human experience of navigating through oppressive educational systems. Authors urge us to consider what it means to be empathic and to engage in the lives of those we serve. Their truths remind us to that standing still should never be an option.

Leadership for Inclusion

A Practical Guide

Series:

Edited by Alan L. Edmunds and Robert R. Macmillan

What task might a principal undertake that would be more critical to teachers and students than to engage in leadership for inclusion? All education stakeholders have an inescapable vested interest in enabling principals in their mandate to be better informed about inclusion and to provide leadership based on such insights. In this manner, principals can directly support teachers who enact inclusion with students on a daily basis. Whilst our aspirations for such professional growth and practice in principals are laudable, exactly what this growth and practice might represent is mostly nebulous; therefore, good leadership for inclusion is more likely to occur by happenstance than by meticulous design. That is no longer the case.
This important and timely collection of international writings examines just what comprises the critical issues within inclusion and provides principals with a series of practical guides to direct their practice. This book takes leadership for inclusion out of the purely theoretical realm and firmly plants it in the professional lives and realities of principals and teachers in schools. The fundamental tenets and suggestions provided here have international application and should be essential readings for all principals and others in similar positions who are concerned about the welfare of teachers and students involved in inclusive education.
Leadership for Inclusion: A Practical Guide makes a significant contribution to an emerging literature in which all professional educators, and especially principals, are beginning to vigorously take on the new challenges presented by inclusion and inclusive schooling. Overall, this volume of candid propositions about principals’ practice invites the reader to engage in likeminded analyses and syntheses and to enfold their newfound knowledge and skills into their leadership. Given the influence that inclusion now has on education around the world, there is no task more worthy.

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Yan Feng

Using autobiographical accounts acquired from her extensive career in education, the author has explored the multi-faceted influences on teacher career motivation and professional development in special and inclusive education in China.
The social realities faced by teachers in their professional lives in a city in China have been highlighted through comparison and contrast with those of their international peers. This is achieved through a comprehensive review of recent literature and an empirical study to encourage teacher voices with this regard. The study reveals opportunities and challenges in China in the process of moving towards inclusive education. In particular, it identifies the impact of teacher recruitment policies, teacher education programmes, education decentralisation, rural-urban disparities as well as socio-cultural values on teacher career motivation and their professional development. It also addresses various implications regarding ethical dilemmas overlooked in previous educational research. Meanwhile, the author proposes a discussion on Self-Determination Theory in terms of motivational change.

Shared Lives

Building Relationships and Community with People who Have Intellectual Disabilities

Roy McConkey, John Dunne and Nick Blitz

Written by three authors who combine a wealth of expertise as researchers, clinicians and practitioners, this challenging book presents a renewed vision for the support of people with intellectual disabilities. Its primary focus is the positive contributions that people with an intellectual disability can make to the lives of others and to their wider communities if given the opportunity. Many real-life examples are given. Central to this, is the nurturing of mutual relationships between people and their supporters, be they paid workers, community volunteers or family members. Also explored is how people can come together in supportive communities that enrich and extend their experiences of life. The building of alliances and the creation of partnership working across different organisations are essential to this. The emphasis is on the role of the paid supporter, which is still critical in the lives of many people but smaller, community-based networks of support with a shared vision of inclusive societies, are seen to be the hallmark of modern service systems. This book is refreshingly different and has a remarkable feel-good quality. It is essential reading for those striving to build person-centred services.

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Edited by Julie Allan, Jenny Ozga and Geri Smith

Social Capital, Professionalism and Diversity is a response to the challenges faced by teachers and other public sector professionals in attempting to manage an increasingly diverse population, whilst simultaneously being subjected to public scrutiny through measures of performance.
Social capital has increasingly been seen by policy makers and academics as a possible resource for education, allowing children and young people, and the professionals who work with them, to do better as a result of having strong networks, relationships and trust. There has, however, been little attention to how social capital might actually be used by professionals within educational contexts or to the benefits of enhanced social capital for children and young people, their families, and the professionals themselves.
The contributors to this volume provide commentaries on what is known about social capital and its use in educational contexts; the engagement of teachers and other professionals with diversity; and social capital and diversity among children, young people and families.
Social Capital, Professionalism and Diversity will appeal to teacher educators and policymakers with concerns about the challenges faced by teachers and other public sector professionals and with an interest in how social capital might enable an effective response to diversity in educational contexts. The book will be of particular interest and use to student and beginning teachers in responding to diversity as they develop their own professional identities and to practising teachers with an interest in pursuing new forms of professional renewal.

We've Scene it All Before

Using Film Clips in Diversity Awareness Training

Series:

Brian C. Johnson

A revolutionary tool for corporate and academic trainers, We’ve Scene It All Before harnesses the power of mainstream Hollywood film to enhance educational sessions about diversity and social justice. This resource manual offers practical guidance on how to effectively use the concept of difference as a starting point towards true inclusion.
Seasoned and novice trainers will appreciate the suggested strategies and best practices on facilitating diversity dialogues, which are coupled with a set of twenty-five definitions that introduce and raise awareness of the personal and systemic nature of difference, discrimination, and power. Workshops on human relations and workplace diversity must move beyond the superficial “celebration” of diversity to the dismantling of systems of privilege and oppression that create environments where members of the organization are disenfranchised and disempowered.
Using clips from a variety of genres of mainstream film allows the trainer to make intercultural concepts visible and offers a way for us to challenge our own values and assumptions. Participants will enjoy the presentations more as they view some of their favorite films in a whole new way; using this familiar medium creates a common basis for entering the discussions all the while giving us the permission to talk about serious and often controversial subjects.
We’ve Scene It All Before: Using Film Clips in Diversity Awareness Training is a learning tool which will be tremendously useful in reducing resistance and increasing thoughtful cross-cultural dialogue.

Challenges for Inclusion

Educational and Social Studies From Britain and the Indian Sub-Continent

Edited by Christopher Adam Bagley and Gajendra K. Verma

This book reviews current controversies and dilemmas in the educational and social development of children and adolescents in Britain, India, Bangladesh and Nepal. Britain is contrasted with the Indian Sub-Continent because in theory at least, Britain has policies which should enable young people to be fully integrated within the educational system, whatever the degree of their original disability, while in the Indian Sub-Continent such educational opportunities are denied to many children because of problems of social structure, values, and poverty. The rights of the disabled to full inclusion are emphasized in two chapters by Sharon Rustemier. But a chapter by Dame Mary Warnock whose report to government designed the system for educational inclusion, shows that British policies for inclusion of the disabled are not working. The chapter by Bagley outlines the 'poverty of education' in Britain, which means that in a highly stratified society many children—both poor and disabled - are excluded from mainstream education by decisions based on school policies and neighbourhood disadvantage.
India in contrast is a culture in which inclusion of the disabled within educational systems is marred by economic poverty, as well as deliberate policies which deny Dalits (formerly known as 'Untouchables’) access to many kinds of educational opportunity. Nevertheless, there are pockets of good practice in India including the legal framework for action, which chapters by Jha and Jaya identify.
The history of educational initiatives for social and educational of the very poor of Bangladesh are reviewed in detail since these initiatives illustrate the work of a unique NGO (BRAC—the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee) which offers advancement for the poorest of the poor in a nation that is significantly poorer than India. Nepal too is also one of the poorest nations on earth, and we offer a detailed account of the trafficking of women and girls from Nepal into Indian brothels. These girls are permanently excluded from all social and educational networks, and their plight poses a major challenge for the movement for the social and educational inclusion of all children.

The Construction of Disability in our Schools

Teacher and Parent perspectives on the experience of labelled students

Series:

Kathryn Underwood

This book is about the meaning of disability in schools. The experience of children with disabilities in schools has undergone substantial change over the last twenty years (and more) with many children who would have once been living in institutions now going to school alongside their peers. With this monumental shift and the continuing increased participation of people with disabilities, one might wonder what disability means. In the age of institutionalisation disability referred to those people who were not able to actively participate in society. As it turns out, many of the people who were deemed unable to participate were so only because the society in which they lived had kept them from active participation through institutionalisation. In Ontario, Canada, where the author lives and works, many adults with disabilities continue to live in institutions and are also active in their communities. So it is not just the institutions that “disable” people. There are many reasons that people fall into the classification of “disabled” and for some this classification begins in an institution, often in the institution of school. This book explores the different beliefs that teachers and parents hold about disability and the types of barriers that cause disability, and how these beliefs translate into education practice.

Doing Inclusive Education Research

Foreword by Michael Apple

Series:

Julie Allan and Roger Slee

Those attempting to research inclusive education face an enormous challenge. Not only is it a highly complex field, but it is also fraught with tensions, sometimes spilling into over into disputes between researchers over ideology. Research textbooks present research decision-making as relatively straightforward and offer little help to students and novice researchers on how to navigate complex fields such as inclusive education or understand ideology. Doing Inclusive Education Research is an attempt to lift the lid on the processes of doing research and uncovers the experiences of key researchers in the field. Len Barton, Mike Oliver, David Gillbourn, Deborah Youdell, Stephen Ball, Ellen Brantlinger, Sally Tomlinson, Mel Ainscow, Lani Florian, Alan Dyson, Suzanne Carrington, Ken Kavale, Karen Harris and Kim Cornish have all opened themselves up to scrutiny and reveal the decisions and choices they made at different points of the research process, as well as some of their concerns as they undertook the work. They also respond to the invitation to discuss the positioning of their work and offer their ‘take’ on the ideological battles. Students and all involved in researching inclusive education will find Doing inclusive education research an indispensable, as well as fascinating, insight into the research process and will gain useful advice on how to engage with this complex field.