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Tibbi Duboys

Paths to Teaching the Holocaust edited by Tibbi Duboys is an important new book. It offers contributions by childhood, middle and secondary teacher educators from various regions and universities in the continental United States. The array of material is a strength of this unique book. Some contributors write about ways in which they infuse existing courses with Holocaust materials, while others focus on where and when to begin the education of their students with respect to genocide. Curriculum and instruction are examined from the perspective of existing research. Preparing oneself to teach the material and personal teaching style are presented in ways that will be helpful both to new and to experienced teachers and those interested in the kinds of questions embedded in this material.
Educators and others will see how events focused upon in the Holocaust are connected to violations of human rights and social justice committed during the period of National Socialism. Readers are reminded of the approximate nature of knowledge when it is not born of lived experience, and are invited to raise questions about the Holocaust and other genocides.
The varied nature of the chapters offers a platform for engaging in discourse likely to pique the interest of people who have limited experience with the topic, and of those whose knowledge may be rich and of long standing. Teachers often seek to bridge the gap between theory and practice, and will find the References of each writer an invaluable resource. The contents of Paths to Teaching the Holocaust will be useful to educators and others concerned with oppression, human rights and social justice.

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Edited by Ray Land, Jan H.F. Meyer and Jan Smith

Threshold Concepts within the Disciplines brings together leading writers from various disciplines and national contexts in an important and readable volume for all those concerned with teaching and learning in higher education.
The foundational principle of threshold concepts is that there are, in each discipline, ‘conceptual gateways’ or ‘portals’ that must be negotiated to arrive at important new understandings. In crossing the portal, transformation occurs, both in knowledge and subjectivity. Such transformation involves troublesome knowledge, a key concern for contributors to this book, who identify threshold concepts in their own fields and suggest how to deal with them.
Part One extends and enhances the threshold concept framework, containing chapters that articulate its qualities, its links to other social theories of learning and other traditions in educational research.
Part Two encompasses the disciplinary heart of the book with contributions from a diversity of areas including computing, engineering, biology, design, modern languages, education and economics. In the many empirical case studies educators show how they have used the threshold concept framework to inform and evaluate their teaching contexts. Other chapters emphasise the equally important ‘being and becoming’ dimension of learning.
Part Three suggests pedagogic directions for those at the centre of the education project with contributions focusing on the socialisation of academics and their continuing quest to be effective teachers.
The book will be of interest to disciplinary teachers, educational researchers and educational developers. It also is of relevance to issues in quality assurance and professional accreditation.