Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 2,094 items for :

  • Classical Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
Clear All
This book concerns the ancient rock-cut monuments carved throughout the Near East, paying particular attention to the fate of these monuments in the centuries after their initial production. As parts of the landscapes in which they were carved, they acquired new meanings in the cultural memory of the people living around them. The volume joins numerous recent studies on the reception of historical texts and artefacts, exploring the peculiar affordances of these long-lasting and often salient monuments. The volume gathers articles by archeologists, art historians, and philologists, covering the entire Near East, from Iran to Lebanon and from Turkey to Egypt. It also analyzes long-lasting textual traditions that aim to explain the origins and meaning of rock-cut monuments and other related carvings.
In this book, Valérie Cordonier and Tommaso De Robertis provide the first study, along with edition and translation, of Chrysostomus Javelli’s epitome of the Liber de bona fortuna (1531), the famous thirteenth-century Latin compilation of the chapters on fortune taken from Aristotle’s Magna Moralia and Eudemian Ethics. An Italian university professor and a prominent figure in the intellectual landscape of sixteenth-century Europe, Javelli (ca. 1470-ca. 1542) commented on nearly the entirety of Aristotle’s corpus. His epitome of the Liber de bona fortuna, the only known Renaissance reading produced on this work, offers an unparalleled insight into the early modern understanding of fortune, standing out as one of the most comprehensive witnesses to discussions on fate, fortune, and free will in the Western world.
Les 203 dédicaces votives en araméen de Palmyre de la période entre IIe et IIIe siècle de n.è. intriguent par 3 dénominations divines : « Béni (soit) son nom pour l’éternité », « Maître de l’Univers » et « le Miséricordieux ». Des études précédentes ont postulé univoquement l’anonymat divin. En étant déçu par cette explication du phénomène des inscriptions palmyréniennes, le livre Des dédicaces sans théonyme de Palmyre : Béni (soit) son nom pour l’éternité a pris pour le point de départ les concepts de remerciement et de louange, en découvrant l’existence d’un hymne rituel comme origine de la formule « Béni (soit) son nom pour l’éternité ». Qui sont donc des dieux, des récepteurs des dédicaces de Palmyre ? Peut-on combiner un nom propre d’un dieu avec ces trois formules ? Ce livre répond à ces questions flagrantes.

203 Palmyrene-Aramaic votive inscriptions from the period between the 2nd and 3rd centuries CE contain three intriguing designations of the gods: “Blessed (be) his name forever”, “Master of the Universe” and “the Merciful”. Previous studies have claimed that the god to whom these inscriptions are addressed is anonymous. Not satisfied with this explanation, Des dédicaces sans théonyme de Palmyre: Béni (soit) son nom pour l’éternité addresses the phenomenon through the lens of thanksgiving and praise, revealing the existence of a contemporary ritual hymn, the origin of the Palmyrene formula “Blessed his name forever”. Who, then, were these gods, the recipients of the dedications? Can we find a match between the formulae and a proper name? This book provides answers to these fascinating questions.
Materials for a Dictionary of the Mediaeval Translations from Greek into Arabic. Volume 2, ب to بين. Second, Revised Edition
From the 8th to the 10th century AD, Greek scientific and philosophical works were translated wholesale into Arabic, sometimes through the mediation of Syriac. A Greek and Arabic Lexicon is the first attempt to present in a systematic and rationalized way, with full analysis of the categories describing the grammar of translation, the vocabulary of these translations as each term appears in context, fully cited. It is an indispensable reference tool for the study and understanding of Arabic scientific and philosophical language and literature and its grammar, the vocabulary of Classical and Middle Greek, the transmission of the text of classical Greek works and their reception in late antiquity and Byzantium, and the reception and translation of the Arabic literature based on them in Byzantine Greek. Fully indexed, this second edition of the work supersedes the first with enhanced precision and breadth of coverage and user-friendly philological analysis.
Studies in Book History, the Classical Tradition, and Humanism in Honor of Craig Kallendorf
Habent sua fata libelli honors the work of Craig Kallendorf, offering studies in several fields in which he chiefly distinguished himself: the history of the book and reading, the classical tradition and reception studies, Renaissance humanism, and Virgilian scholarship with a special focus on the creative transformation of the Aeneid through the centuries. The volume is rounded out by an appreciation of Craig Kallendorf, including a review of his scholarship and its significance.

In addition to the topics mentioned above, the volume’s twenty-five contributions by scholars in America and Europe are of relevance to those working in the fields of classical philology, Neo-Latin, political philosophy, poetry and poetics, printing and print culture, Romance languages, art history, translation studies, and Renaissance and early modern Europe generally.

Contributors include: Alessandro Barchiesi, Susanna Braund, Hélène Casanova-Robin, Jean-Louis Charlet, Federica Ciccolella, Ingrid De Smet, Margaret Ezell, Edoardo Fumagalli, Julia Gaisser, Lucia Gualdo Rosa, James Hankins, Andrew Laird, Marc Laureys, John Monfasani, Timothy Moore, Colette Nativel, Marianne Pade, Lisa Pon, Wayne Rebhorn, Alden Smith, Sarah Spence, Fabio Stok, Richard Thomas, and Marino Zorzi.