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Author: Dirk Geeraerts
Cognitive Sociolinguistics combines the interest in meaning of Cognitive Linguistics with the interest in social variation of sociolinguistics, converging on two domains of enquiry: variation of meaning, and the meaning of variation. These Ten Lectures, a transcribed version of talks given by professor Geeraerts in 2009 at Beihang University in Beijing, introduce and illustrate both dimensions. The ‘variation of meaning’ perspective involves looking at types of semantic and categorial variation, at the role of social and cultural factors in semantic variation and change, and at the interplay of stereotypes, prototypes and norms. The ‘meaning of variation’ perspective involves looking at the way in which categorization processes of the type studied by Cognitive Linguistics shape how scholars and laymen think about language variation.
Author: Allon Uhlmann
In Arabic Instruction in Israel Allon J. Uhlmann confronts two conundrums, namely the persistently poor level of Arabic proficiency among Jewish Arabic students and teachers, and the traumatic alienation of Arab students by university Arabic grammar instruction.

These are not aberrations but rather direct, albeit unintended, systemic consequences of the field of Arabic instruction, where Jewish students encounter Arabic as a dead, hostile language; Jewish hegemony devalues native Arabic proficiency; and Arab students are locked into a fractured educational trajectory – encountering two alienating and mutually unintelligible grammars of Arabic at school and at university.

By tracing systemic variabilities in cognition and learning Uhlmann exposes hitherto misrecognised dynamics that hinder Arabic instruction in Israel, thereby offering new avenues for possible change.

Author: John Taylor
A series of 10 lectures on various aspects of Cognitive Linguistics as these relate to matters of language teaching and learning. Topics addressed include the role of categorization, the nature of rules, the encyclopaedic scope of semantics, spatial expressions, metaphor and metonymy, nouns and nominals, tense and aspect, and the theoretical status of the phoneme.
Faculty Experiences with For-Profit Matriculation Pathway Programs
Author: Carter Winkle
Carter Winkle provides insight into the contemporary phenomena of partnerships between universities and for-profit educational service providers resulting in matriculation pathway programs for non-native English speaking students in the United States. Positive and negative implications of such partnerships are illuminated through interpretation of empirically derived narrative accounts of English language program administrators, English language teaching faculty, and academic discipline faculty working in contexts where such joint-venture matriculation pathway programs exist. The book retells stories of these academic professionals and examines how the new governance structures and practices of these programs impacted them and their work context, focusing on their institutional status, autonomy in curricular and pedagogical decision-making, and perceptions of how these new corporate initiatives affected students and their host institutions.
This third volume in the Media for All series offers a diverse selection of articles which bear testimony to the vigour and versatility of research and developments in audiovisual translation and media accessibility. The collection reflects the critical impact of new technologies on AVT, media accessibility and consumer behaviour and shows the significant increase in collaborative and interdisciplinary research targeting changing consumer perceptions as well as quality issues. Complementing newcomers such as crowdsourcing and potentially universal emoticons, classical themes of AVT studies such as linguistic analyses and corpus-based research are featured. Prevalent throughout the volume is the impact of technology on both methodologies and content. The book will be of interest to researchers from a wide range of disciplines as well as audiovisual translators, lecturers, trainers and students, producers and developers working in the field of language and media accessibility.
Language Program Leadership in a Changing World: An Ecological Model presents a comprehensive view of management and leadership in language programs as situated in a complex, globalized context with rapidly changing characteristics. The language program is described as an extensive ecology made up of many different types of interacting parts, which leaders of these programs must manage and balance with strong attention to context and to the future. The discussion emphasizes the complexity of the job of leading a language program and the many types of roles the leadership must fill in monitoring the program and its context for continuity and change and leading with an eye the future. The focus is on college and university English language programs, with discussion of the place they occupy within academia and in relation to other types of language programs (e.g. foreign language and English composition). The book is both practical and theoretical, offering case studies and overviews of 'nuts and bolts' issues of administration such as financial, data, and people management, in addition to an original model that problematizes and theorizes the language program based on notions of ecology and frames, a review of research, and suggestions for further research.
Perhaps more than in any other period in modern history, our globalized present is characterized by a constant interaction of, and exposure to, different peoples, regions, ways of life, traditions, languages, and cultures. Cross-boundary communication today comes in various shapes: as mutual exchange, open dialogue, enforced process, misunderstanding, or even violent conflict. In this situation, ‘translation’ has become an inevitable requirement in order to ease the flow of disinterested and unbiased cultural communication. The contributors to this collection approach the subject of the ‘translation of cultures’ from various angles. Translation refers, of course, to the rendering of texts from one language into another and the shift between languages under precolonial (retelling/transcreation), colonial (domestication), and postcolonial (multilingual trafficking) conditions. It is also concerned with the (in-)adequacy of the Western translation concept of equivalence, the problem of the (un)translatability of cultures, and new postcolonial approaches (representation through translation). Translation here is used as a broader term covering the interaction of cultures, the transfer of cultural experience, the concern with cultural borders, the articulation of liminal experience, and intercultural understanding.
Basil Bunting and British Modernism
This book explores Basil Bunting’s continued reputation and influence in modern British poetry, and also the impact of a peculiarly ‘Northern’ inflection of Modernism (which Bunting largely defined) within the varieties of poetry being written in Britain today. The editors asked a variety of English, Scottish, Welsh and American poets and academics to reflect upon the themes, implications, impact or example of Bunting’s work in the centenary year of his birth, looking back on the beginnings of Modernism at the start of the twentieth century into which he was born, or forward into the twenty-first century in which he continues to be read and learned from: a true poetic star to steer by.
The resulting collection of fourteen new essays reveals the continued ability of Bunting’s poetry both to delight and to challenge. Topics covered include the nature of influence; Celtic and Northumbrian contexts for the modern English long poem; prosodic patterns in early Bunting; Bunting as a reader of his own work; narrative sources in his poetry; the problem of patronage; his ‘rueful masculinity’; women poets and Bunting; radical landscape poetry; his translations from the Persian Hafiz and the Roman Horace; economic and social tensions in his work; the poet as ‘makar’; and a previously unpublished selection of his letters from the 1960s to the 1980s, commenting upon his own and others’ poetry and on the political condition of Britain in those years.
The collection will be of interest to teachers and readers of twentieth century English and American poetry, and to those exploring the processes of literary translation. Contributors include David Annwn, Richard Caddel, Roy Fisher, Victoria Forde, Harry Gilonis, Ian Gregson, Philip Hobsbaum, Parvin Loloi, James McGonigal, Richard Price, Glynn Pursglove, Harriet Tarlo, Gael Turnbull, and Jonathan Williams.
The Goddess in Indo-Caribbean Ritual and Fiction
Translating Kali's Feast is an interdisciplinary study of the Goddess Kali bringing together ethnography and literature within the theoretical framework of translation studies. The idea for the book grew out of the experience and fieldwork of the authors, who lived with Indo-Caribbean devotees of the Hindu Goddess in Guyana. Using a variety of discursive forms including oral history and testimony, field notes, songs, stories, poems, literary essays, photographic illustrations, and personal and theoretical reflections, it explores the cultural, aesthetic and spiritual aspects of the Goddess in a diasporic and cross-cultural context. With reference to critical and cultural theorists including Walter Benjamin and Julia Kristeva, the possibilities offered by Kali (and other manifestations of the Goddess) as the site of translation are discussed in the works of such writers as Wilson Harris, V.S. Naipaul and R.K. Narayan. The book articulates perspectives on the experience of living through displacement and change while probing the processes of translation involved in literature and ethnography and postulating links between ‘rite' and ‘write,' Hindu ‘leela' and creole ‘play.'