Series:

Jeffrey M. Zacks

The representation of events is a central topic for cognitive science. In this series of lectures, Jeffrey M. Zacks situates event representations and their role in language within a theory of perception and memory. Event representations have a distinctive structure and format that result from computational and neural mechanisms operating during perception and language comprehension. A crucial aspect of the mechanisms is that event representations are updated to optimize their predictive utility. This updating has consequences for action control and for long-term memory. Event cognition changes across the adult lifespan and can be impaired by conditions including Alzheimer’s disease. These mechanisms have broad impact on everyday activity, and have shaped the development of media such as cinema and narrative fiction.

Evolution and Consciousness

From a Barren Rocky Earth to Artists, Philosophers, Meditators and Psychotherapists

Series:

Michael M. DelMonte and Maeve Halpin

This volume provides a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the emerging concept of the evolution of consciousness. The simple, but dynamic, theory of evolving consciousness blends the powerful insights of modern science with the deep wisdom of age-old cultures, synthesising the traditions of East and West, of the head and heart, of male and female and of science and spirituality. To borrow a phrase from American philosopher Ken Wilber, it is a concept that “transcends and includes” all that has gone before. By integrating diverse multi-disciplinary approaches, it provides an overarching and transcending model that moves us to a new level of meaning and understanding of our place in the world, and in so doing deepens our work as psychotherapists.

Series:

Edited by Masamichi Sasaki

Trust in Contemporary Society, by well-known trust researchers, deals with conceptual, theoretical and social interaction analyses, historical data on societies, national surveys or cross-national comparative studies, and methodological issues related to trust. The authors are from a variety of disciplines: psychology, sociology, political science, organizational studies, history, and philosophy, and from Britain, the United States, the Czech Republic, the Netherlands, Australia, Germany, and Japan. They bring their vast knowledge from different historical and cultural backgrounds to illuminate contemporary issues of trust and distrust. The socio-cultural perspective of trust is important and increasingly acknowledged as central to trust research. Accordingly, future directions for comparative trust research are also discussed.

Contributors include: Jack Barbalet, John Brehm, Geoffrey Hosking, Robert Marsh, Barbara A. Misztal, Guido Möllering, Bart Nooteboom, Ken J. Rotenberg, Jiří Šafr, Masamichi Sasaki, Meg Savel, Markéta Sedláčková, Jörg Sydow, Piotr Sztompka.

Edited by Argiro Vatakis, Fuat Balcı, Massimiliano Di Luca and Ángel Correa

Timing and Time Perception: Procedures, Measures, and Applications is a one-of-a-kind, collective effort to present the most utilized and known methods on timing and time perception. Specifically, it covers methods and analysis on circadian timing, synchrony perception, reaction/response time, time estimation, and alternative methods for clinical/developmental research. The book includes experimental protocols, programming code, and sample results and the content ranges from very introductory to more advanced so as to cover the needs of both junior and senior researchers. We hope that this will be the first step in future efforts to document experimental methods and analysis both in a theoretical and in a practical manner.

Contributors are: Patricia V. Agostino, Rocío Alcalá-Quintana, Fuat Balcı, Karin Bausenhart, Richard Block, Ivana L. Bussi, Carlos S. Caldart, Mariagrazia Capizzi, Xiaoqin Chen, Ángel Correa, Massimiliano Di Luca, Céline Z. Duval, Mark T. Elliott, Dagmar Fraser, David Freestone, Miguel A. García-Pérez, Anne Giersch, Simon Grondin, Nori Jacoby, Florian Klapproth, Franziska Kopp, Maria Kostaki, Laurence Lalanne, Giovanna Mioni, Trevor B. Penney, Patrick E. Poncelet, Patrick Simen, Ryan Stables, Rolf Ulrich, Argiro Vatakis, Dominic Ward, Alan M. Wing, Kieran Yarrow, and Dan Zakay.

Series:

Edited by Grzegorz Maziarczyk and Joanna Klara Teske

Explorations of Consciousness in Contemporary Fiction is a collection of essays examining the potential of the contemporary English-language novel to represent and inquire into various aspects of the human mind. Grounded in contemporary literary theory as well as consciousness studies, the essays consider both narrative techniques by means of which writers attempt to render various states of consciousness (such as multimodality in digital fiction or experimental typography in post-traumatic narratives), and novelistic interpretations of issues currently being investigated by neurobiologists, cognitive scientists and philosophers of the mind (such as the adaptive value of consciousness or the process of self-integration by means of self-narration). The volume thus offers critical reflection upon the novel’s cognitive accomplishment in this challenging area.

Contributors are: Nathan D. Frank, Judit Friedrich, Justyna Galant, Marta Komsta, Péter Kristóf Makai, Ajitpaul Mangat, Grzegorz Maziarczyk, James McAdams, Daniel Panka, Barbara Puschmann-Nalenz, Joanna Klara Teske, Lloyd Issac Vayo, Dóra Vecsernyés, Sylwia Wilczewska

Edited by Elisa Raffaella Ferrè and Laurence R. Harris

In this volume specific cognitive sub-functions are identified and indications of how basic vestibular input contributes to each are described. The broad range of these functions is consistent with the broad spread of vestibular projections throughout the cortex. Combining vestibular signals about the head’s orientation relative to gravity with information about head position relative to the body provides sufficient information to map body position onto the ground surface and underlie the sense of spatial position. But vestibular signals are also fundamental to sensorimotor control and even to high-level bodily perception such as the sense of body ownership and the anchoring of perspective to the body. Clinical observations confirm the essential role of vestibular signals in maintaining a coherent self-representation and suggest some novel rehabilitation strategies.

The chapters presented in this volume are previously published in a Special Issue of Multisensory Research, Volume 28, Issue 5-6 (2015).

Contributors are: M. Barnett-Cowan, O. Blanke, J. Blouin, G. Bosco, G. Bottini, J.-P. Bresciani, J.C. Culham, C.L. Darlington, A.W. Ellis, E.R. Ferrè, M. Gandola, L. Grabherr, S. Gravano, P. Grivaz, E. Guillaud, P. Haggard, L.R. Harris, A.E.N. Hoover, I. Indovina, K. Jáuregu Renaud, M. Kaliuzhna, F. Lacquaniti, B. Lenggenhager, C. Lopez, G. Macauda, V. Maffei, F.W. Mast, B. La Scaleia, B.M. Seemungal, M. Simoneau, P.F. Smith, J.C. Snow, D. Vibert, M. Zago, and Y. Zheng.

Eros and Revolution

The Critical Philosophy of Herbert Marcuse

Series:

Javier Sethness Castro

In Eros and Revolution, Javier Sethness Castro presents a comprehensive intellectual and political biography of the world-renowned critical theorist Herbert Marcuse (1898-1979). Investigating the origins and development of Marcuse's dialectical approach vis-à-vis Hegel, Marx, Fourier, Heidegger, and Freud as well as the central figures of the Frankfurt School—Horkheimer, Adorno, Neumann, Fromm, and Benjamin—Sethness Castro chronicles the radical philosopher's lifelong activism in favor of anti-capitalism, anti-fascism, and anti-authoritarianism together with Marcuse's defiant revindication of global libertarian-socialist revolution as the precondition for the realization of reason, freedom, and human happiness. Beyond examining Marcuse's revolutionary life and contributions, moreover, the author contemplates the philosopher's relevance to contemporary struggle, especially with regard to ecology, feminism, anarchism, and the general cause of worldwide social transformation.

Series:

Shlomit Yadlin-Gadot

In Truth Matters: Theory and Practice in Psychoanalysis, Shlomit Yadlin-Gadot offers an original construal of subjectivity as evolving from dynamic tensions between conflicting truths that inhabit and structure the psyche. The clinical endeavour is articulated in terms of unveiling these truths and allowing the multi-faceted nature of human experience to emerge. Yadlin-Gadot's notion of truth axes combines philosophical investigation with an in-depth inquiry of psychoanalytic theory as it relates these truths to basic human needs and developmental challenges, alternating self-states and unconscious processes. Detailed clinical vignettes illustrate these insights and enrich psychoanalytic practice with innovative technique.

“This is a brilliant and original work that addresses a much-neglected issue in psychoanalytic thinking, the fundamental role of truth in psychoanalytic theory and practice. The author accomplishes this goal with panache and originality, in a style of exposition that is both accessible and illuminating. This book represents a major achievement in the annals of psychoanalytic scholarship.”
Michael Guy Thompson, Author of The Death of Desire (Routledge) and The Truth about Freud’s Technique (New York University Press).

Time Distortions in Mind

Temporal Processing in Clinical Populations

Edited by Argiro Vatakis and Melissa Allman

Time Distortions in Mind brings together current research on aspects of temporal processing in clinical populations, in the ultimate hope of elucidating the interdependence between perturbations in timing and disturbances in the mind and brain. Such research may inform not only typical psychological functioning, but may also elucidate the psychological consequences of any pathophysiological differences in temporal processing.
This collection of current knowledge on temporal processing in clinical populations is an excellent reference for the student and scientist interested in the topic, but it also serves as the stepping-stone to share ideas and push forward the advancement in understanding how distorted timing can lead to a disturbed brain and mind or vice versa.

Contributors to this volume: Ryan D. Ward, Billur Avlar, Peter D Balsam, Deana B. Davalos, Jamie Opper, Yvonne Delevoye-Turrell, Hélène Wilquin, Mariama Dione, Anne Giersch, Laurence Lalanne, Mitsouko van Assche, Patrick E. Poncelet, Mark A. Elliott, Deborah L. Harrington, Stephen M. Rao, Catherine R.G. Jones, Marjan Jahanshahi, Bon-Mi Gu, Anita J. Jurkowski, Jessica I. Lake, Chara Malapani, Warren H. Meck, Rebecca M. C. Spencer, Dawn Wimpory, Brad Nicholas, Elzbieta Szelag, Aneta Szymaszek, Anna Oron, Melissa J. Allman, Christine M. Falter, Argiro Vatakis, Alexandra Elissavet Bakou

Series:

Edited by Sari Katajala-Peltomaa and Susanna Niiranen

The boundaries between mental, social and physical order and various states of disorder – unexpected mood swings, fury, melancholy, stress, insomnia, and demonic influence – form the core of this compilation. For medieval men and women, religious rituals, magic, herbs, dietary requirements as well as to scholastic medicine were a way to cope with the vagaries of mental wellbeing; the focus of the articles is on the interaction and osmosis between lay and elite cultures as well as medical, theological and political theories and practical experiences of daily life.
Time span of the volume is the later Middle Ages, c. 1300-1500. Geographically it covers Western Europe and the comparison between Mediterranean world and Northern Europe is an important constituent.
Contributors are Jussi Hanska, Gerhard Jaritz, Timo Joutsivuo, Kirsi Kanerva, Sari Katajala-Peltomaa, Marko Lamberg, Iona McCleery, Susanna Niiranen, Sophie Oosterwijk, and Catherine Rider.