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Race, Time, and the German Islam Conference
In 2006 against the background of the increasing problematization of Muslims and Islam in German public debate, the German government established the German Islam Conference. In a post 9/11 world, this was a time period shaped by the global war on terror, changes in the German naturalization law, the proliferation of racism targeting Muslims, and the expansion of security apparatuses. In Governing Muslims and Islam in Contemporary Germany Luis Manuel Hernández Aguilar critically analyzes the institutionalization of the Conference and the different projects this institution has set in motion to govern Islam and Muslims against the looming presence of racial representations of Muslims. The analysis begins with the foundation of the Conference until the end of its second phase in 2014.
Women Judges in the Muslim World: A Comparative Study of Discourse and Practice fills a gap in academic scholarship by examining public debates and judicial practices surrounding the performance of women as judges in eight Muslim-majority countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, Syria, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia and Morocco). Gender, class, and ethnic biases are inscribed in laws, particularly in the domain of shariʿa-derived family law. Editors Nadia Sonneveld and Monika Lindbekk have carefully woven together the extensive fieldwork and expertise of each author. The result is a rich tapestry that brings out the various effects of women judges in the management of justice. In contrast to early scholarship, they convincingly prove that ‘the woman judge’ does not exist.

Contributors are: Monique C. Cardinal, Jessica Carlisle, Monika Lindbekk, Rubya Mehdi, Valentine M. Moghadam, Najibah Mohd Zin, Euis Nurlaelawati, Arskal Salim, Nadia Sonneveld, Ulrike Schultz and Maaike Voorhoeve.
Vocabulaire et argumentation du discours coranique autoréférentiel
Dans Le Coran par lui-même, Anne-Sylvie Boisliveau livre une analyse passionnante de la manière dont le Coran est l’architecte de sa propre image. Loin d’être un texte sans relief, celui-ci utilise un vocabulaire, des procédés rhétoriques et une argumentation soigneusement choisis pour orienter l’image qu’auditeurs ou lecteurs se feront de lui.
Une analyse serrée du vocabulaire autoréférentiel montre que le Coran se décrit lui-même comme Ecriture « façon judéo-chrétienne » représentant un enjeu de communication. Mais surtout, par un triple discours – sur les actions divines, sur les Ecritures révélées antérieurement, telles la Bible, et sur la fonction prophétique –, le Coran se confère à lui-même le monopole de l’autorité issue de la révélation divine et pousse l’auditeur/lecteur à s’y soumettre.

In Le Coran par lui-même, Anne-Sylvie Boisliveau provides a ground-breaking analysis of the way the Qurʾān is the architect of its own image. Far from being a flat text, the Qurʾān uses carefully chosen vocabulary, rhetorical tools and argumentation to direct the image that listeners or readers will then have in mind. A close analysis of its self-referential vocabulary shows that the Qurʾān describes itself as a Scripture “in a Judeo-Christian style” which communicative function is stressed. By a triple discourse (on divine actions, on previous Scriptures such as the Bible and on prophethood), the Qurʾān grants itself the monopoly of divine authority through revelation and pushes the listener/reader into a decisive submission.

Winner of the I. R. Iran World Award for the Book of the Year 2014