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This is the first English written book that includes the most significant opinions of Judge Paulo Pinto de Albuquerque delivered at the European Court of Human Rights. He was the President of the Committee on the Rules of the Court, the President of the Criminal Law Group of the Court and the focal point for the international relations of the European Court with Constitutional and Supreme Courts outside Europe. Previously he had worked as an anti-corruption leading expert for the Council of Europe.
As Full Professor at the Faculty of Law of the Catholic University of Lisbon, he has published, inter alia, 23 books in English, French, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Turkish and Ukranian and 65 legal articles and book chapters in those languages as well as Chinese and German. Since his appointment as a Judge in Strasbourg, he has authored 157 opinions that have significantly contributed to the development of international human rights law. The Judge’s decisions are regularly cited by academic scholars and practitioners in human rights law, public international law, criminal law, migration and refugee law.
The Austrian Review of International and European Law is an annual publication that provides a scholarly forum for the discussion of issues of international and European law, with emphasis on topics of special interest for Austria. Each volume of the Review includes general articles, current developments, and the comprehensive annual digest of Austrian practice in international law, encompassing judicial decisions, executive as well as parliamentary documents relating to international law. The concluding parts of the Review contain longer book reviews and shorter book notes. Volume 23 covers 2018 and features ten stories of international law spanning across the last century.
This volume, Minority Self-Government in Europe and the Middle East: From Theory to Practice, is novel from several perspectives. It combines theory with facts on the ground, going beyond legal perspectives without neglecting existing laws and their implementation. Theoretical discussions transcend examining existing autonomy models in certain regions. It offers new models in the field, discussing such critical themes as environmentalism. Traditional concepts such as self-determination and well-known successful autonomy examples, including the Åland Islands, Basque and Catalonian models, are examined from different perspectives. Some chapters in this volume focus on certain regions (including Turkey, Syria, and Iraq) which have only recently received scholarly attention. Chapters complement one another in terms of their theoretical inputs and outputs from the field.
The Åland Strait is a particularly important sea route connecting the Gulf of Bothnia with the Baltic Sea between Sweden and the Åland Islands. The Åland Strait is closely connected to the Åland Islands, which were demilitarised in the international legal treaty ending the Crimean War in the 1850s. Following World War I, the Åland Strait was also regulated by the 1921 Convention relating to the Non-fortification of and Neutralisation of the Åland Islands. This book is the first to examine passage rights in the Åland Strait according to the Law of the Sea and its long history in times of war and peace.
Editor: Pavel Šturma
The Rome Statute of the ICC at its Twentieth Anniversary (Achievements and Perspectives) is an edited book comprising of 13 chapters written by contributors to a conference dedicated to discuss the development, achievements and possible future evolution of the Rome Statute and international criminal law. The authors include academics from various legal systems, practitioners from the ICC and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, attorneys and other law experts.

The International Criminal Court is the first universal international criminal tribunal. Though quite new, as the Rome Statute was adopted 20 years ago (1998) and only 16 years have passed since its entry into force, it has already developed interesting case-law and continues to elaborate on both substantive and procedural international criminal law.

Contributors are Ivana Hrdličková, Claus Kreß, Tamás Lattmann, Jan Lhotský, Milan Lipovský, Iryna Marchuk, Josef Mrázek, Anna Richterová, Simon De Smet, Ondřej Svaček, Pavel Šturma, Kateřina Uhlířová, Kristýna Urbanová, Aloka Wanigasuriya.
Understanding the realities of protection in a Europe that had failed to manage the crisis in asylum that unfolded in 2015 and 2016 requires a comprehension of how law shapes and distorts refugee protection practices in frontline states. In this collection Vladislava Stoyanova and Eleni Karageorgiou provide an essential cartography of the state of asylum during the crisis. The volume captures four dynamics: the absorption of EU norms in Central and South Eastern Europe; the reaction in this region to the massive movement of asylum seekers in 2015 and 2016; the initiation of normative developments in the area of asylum during and beyond the crisis by the countries in this region; and the question of solidarity.
Essays in Memory of Tom Lantos
Managing Editor: Mate Fischer
Tom Lantos was a Hungarian-born U.S. Congressman remembered for raising awareness and respect for human rights around the world. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1980 becoming the only Holocaust survivor ever to serve in the Congress. In 1983 he co-founded and chaired the Congressional Human Rights Caucus renamed in his honour as the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission. With articles authored by leading academics this Festschrift remembers Tom Lantos’s extensive human rights activism on the human rights themes he was passionately involved with around the world. The essays offer new insights on a range of topical human rights issues, such as human rights education, religious freedom, post-conflict justice, minority rights and identity politics.
Between Normative Flexibility and Institutional Rigidity
In The Requirement of Consultation with Indigenous Peoples in the ILO, María Victoria Cabrera Ormaza examines the law-making and interpretive practice of the International Labour Organization (ILO) relating to indigenous peoples with a particular focus on the consultation requirement established by Article 6 of ILO Convention No. 169. Taking into account both the mandate and institutional characteristics of the ILO, the author explains how the ILO understands the notion of consultation with indigenous peoples and outlines the flaws in its approach. Through a comprehensive analysis of state practice and human rights jurisprudence concerning indigenous peoples, the author explores the normative impact of ILO Convention No. 169, while revisiting the ILO’s potential to help harmonize different interpretations of the consultation requirement.
The Assessment of Individual Complaints by the European Court of Human Rights under Article 3 ECHR and the United Nations Committee against Torture under Article 3 CAT
Author: Fanny De Weck
This volume offers a comprehensive analysis and comparison of the case law and practice of the European Court of Human Rights and the United Nations Committee against Torture in individual cases concerning the principle of non-refoulement. It covers both procedural and material aspects relevant in expulsion and extradition cases submitted by individuals under Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) or Article 3 of the United Nations Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT).

The book is a particularly helpful tool for asylum lawyers, human rights advocates, and other practitioners. It is also a reference work of significant value to scholars interested in non-refoulement under both conventions and in the context of human rights or refugee law in general.

In National Identities and the Right to Self-Determination of Peoples, Hilly Moodrick-Even Khen revisits the legal right to self-determination of peoples and suggests an integrative model for securing the cohesion of the various nationalities within multinational states. The model, set on both legal and political science theories, departs from civic nationalism but calls to strengthen it with more immediate and emotional means, such as shared national symbols and multicultural education. Moodrick-Even Khen explores the political history of Canada, Belgium, and Spain and touches upon other divided societies such as South Africa, Northern Ireland and Cyprus. Drawing upon these cases, she suggests a future model for a cohesive society in Israel, which is currently nationally divided between Arabs and Jews.