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In A Grammar of Lopit, Jonathan Moodie and Rosey Billington provide the first detailed description of Lopit, an Eastern Nilotic language traditionally spoken in the Lopit Mountains in South Sudan. Drawing on extensive primary data, the authors describe the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the Lopit language. Their analyses offer new insights into phenomena characteristic of Nilo-Saharan languages, such as ‘Advanced Tongue Root’ vowel distinctions, tripartitite number marking, and marked-nominative case systems, and they uncover patterns which are previously unattested within the Eastern Nilotic family, such as a three-way contrast in aspect, number marking with the ‘greater singular’, and two kinds of inclusory constructions. This book offers a significant contribution to the descriptive and typological literature on African languages.
Puentes culturales críticos entre África, Latinoamérica y España
Trans-afrohispanismos: puentes culturales críticos entre África, Latinoamérica y España is an innovative approach to Afro-Hispanic Studies. It focuses on the connections between peoples, territories, and media of expression at the confluence of Africa and the Hispanic world. The volume’s contributors apply perspectives from their respective areas of specialization to their examination of transcultural interactions in a diverse range of contexts. These include Equatorial Guinea, Western Sahara, Spain, Morocco, Afro-descendant communities in Latin America and transnational spaces generated by digital technologies and contemporary migration. The volume offers an expanded understanding of Afro-Hispanic Studies and serves as a model of inquiry in a field whose hallmark is the mobility of people and knowledge.

Trans-afrohispanismos: puentes culturales críticos entre África, Latinoamérica y España es una aproximación innovadora a los Estudios Afrohispánicos. Destaca las conexiones entre gentes, territorios y medios de expresión en la confluencia de África y el mundo hispánico. Estos incluyen Guinea Ecuatorial, el Sáhara Occidental, España, Marruecos, comunidades de afrodescendientes en América Latina y los espacios transnacionales originados por las tecnologías digitales y la migración. Este libro ofrece una visión más amplia de los Estudios Afrohispánicos. Adicionalmente, sirve de modelo de investigación en un campo cuya seña de identidad es la movilidad de gentes y conocimientos.

Contributors are: Joanna Allan, Eduard Arriaga, Antonio Becerra Bolaños, Justo Bolekia Boleká, Julia Borst, Milagros Carazas, Dosinda García-Alvite, Maya García de Vinuesa, Gloria Lara Millán, Alain Lawo-Sukam, Bahia Mahmud Awah, Dorothy Odartey-Wellington, Elisa Rizo, Nayra Pérez Hernández, Juliane Tauchnitz and Kofi Yakpo.
Youth and Political Engagement in Africa
Volume Editors: Elina Oinas, Henri Onodera, and Leena Suurpää
What Politics? Youth and Political Engagement in Africa examines the diverse experiences of being young in today’s Africa. It offers new perspectives to the roles and positions young people take to change their life conditions both within and beyond the formal political structures and institutions. The contributors represent several social science disciplines, and provide well-grounded qualitative analyses of young people’s everyday engagements by critically examining dominant discourses of youth, politics and ideology. Despite focusing on Africa, the book is a collective effort to better understand what it is like to be young today, and what the making of tomorrow’s yesterday means for them in personal and political terms.

Contributors are: Ehaab Abdou, Abebaw Yirga Adamu, Henni Alava, Päivi Armila, Randi Rønning Balsvik, Jesper Bjarnesen, Þóra Björnsdóttir, Jónína Einarsdóttir, Tilo Grätz, Nanna Jordt Jørgensen, Marko Kananen, Sofia Laine, Naydene de Lange, Afifa Ltifi, Ivo Mhike, Claudia Mitchell, Relebohile Moletsane, Danai S. Mupotsa, Elina Oinas, Henri Onodera, Eija Ranta, Mounir Saidani, Mariko Sato, Loubna H. Skalli, Tiina Sotkasiira, Abdoulaye Sounaye, Leena Suurpää, and Mulumebet Zenebe.
The White Spaces of Kenyan Settler Writing provides an overview of Kenyan literature by white writers in the half-century before Independence in 1964. Such literature has been over-shadowed by that of black writers to the point of critical ostracism. It deserves attention for its own sake, as the expression of a community that hoped for permanence but suffered both disappointment and dispossession. It deserves attention for its articulation of an increasingly desperate colonial and Imperial situation at a time when both were being attacked and abandoned in Africa, as in other colonies elsewhere, and when a counter-discourse was being constructed by writers in Britain as well as in Africa. Kenya was likely the best-known twentieth-century colony, for it attracted publicity for its iconic safaris and its Happy Valley scandals. Yet behind such scenes were settlers who had taken over lands from the native peoples and who were trying to make a future for themselves, based on the labour, willing or forced, of those people. This situation can be seen as a microcosm of one colonial exercise, and can illuminate the historical tensions of such times. The bibliography is an attempt to collect the literary resources of white Kenya in this historically significant period.
Rashda:The Birth and Growth of an Egyptian Oasis Village is an interdisciplinary study from a multi-perspective, using various kinds of data and information. It offers a comprehensive description of Rashda, a village in Dakhla Oasis in Egypt from its beginning to the present. Key concepts are the uncertainty of the water supply, the dependence on the political regime and the rational behaviour of individuals. The villagers of Rashda have dealt with the difficult natural circumstances by creating the local customs of irrigation and cultivation. The development of village recently depends ever more on the government, as long as large amounts of finance and superior technology are necessary to dig deeper wells to secure water for cultivation.
Redefining the Empire with Forced Labor and New Imperialism
Forced convict labor provided the Portuguese with solutions to the growing criminal population at home and the lack of infrastructure in Angola and Mozambique. In Convict Labor in the Portuguese Empire, Timothy J. Coates examines the role of large numbers of convicts in Portuguese Africa from 1800 until 1932. This work examines the numbers, rationale, and realities of convict labor (largely) in Angola during this period, but Mozambique is a secondary area, as well as late colonial times in Brazil.

This is a unique, first study of an experiment in convict labor in Africa directed by a European power; it will be welcomed by scholars of Africa and New Imperialism, as well as those interested in law and labor.
Author: Cleo Cantone
This book constitutes a seminal contribution to the fields of Islamic architectural history and gender studies. It is the first major empirical study of the history and current state of mosque building in Senegal and the first study of mosque space from a gender perspective. The author positions Senegalese mosques within the field of Islamic architectural history, unraveling their history through pre-colonial travelers’ accounts to conversations with present-day planners, imams and women who continually shape and reshape the mosques they worship in. Using contemporary Dakar as a case study, the book’s second aim is to explore the role of women in the “making and remaking” of mosques. In particular, the rise of non-tariqa grass-roots movements (i.e.: the “Sunni/Ibadou” movement) has empowered women (particularly young women) and has greatly strengthened their capacity to use mosques as places of spirituality, education and socialization. The text is aimed at several specialized readerships: readers interested in Islam in West Africa, in the role of women in Islam, as well as those interested in the sociology and art-history of mosques.
Religious Change among Oromo Muslims in Bale, Ethiopia
Author: Terje Østebø
The political transition in 1991 and the new regime’s policy towards the ethnic and religious diversity in Ethiopia have contributed to increased activities from various Islamic reform movements. Among these, we find the Salafi movement which expanded rapidly throughout the 1990s, particularly in the Oromo-speaking south-eastern parts of the country. This book sheds light on the emergence and expansion of Salafism in Bale. Focusing on the diversified body of situated actors and their role in the process of religious change, it discusses the early arrival of Salafism in the late 1960s, follows it through the Marxist period (1974-1991) before discussing the rapid expansion of the movement in the 1990s. The movement’s dynamics and the controversies emerging as a result of the reforms are discussed, particularly with reference to different understandings of sources for religious knowledge and the role of Islamic literacy.
Marking the Present, Re-presenting the Past
This book is a catalogue and a reader. It is the companion to the exhibition "Democracy X' held in Cape Town 2004. It also explores a range of historical, cultural and political matters around the 10th anniversary of the new democratic South-Africa.
Richly illustrated, this book includes essays of eminent writers about topics such as the Boer War, the Iron Age, ethnic politics, nationalism, film and popular media.