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The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law

Volume 3, 2019, Law, Gender and Sexuality

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Edited by Javaid Rehman, Ayesha Shahid and Steve Foster

The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law aims to publish peer-reviewed scholarly articles and reviews as well as significant developments in human rights and humanitarian law. It examines international human rights and humanitarian law with a global reach, though its particular focus is on the Asian region.

The focused theme of Volume 3 is Law, Gender and Sexuality.

Public Diplomacy at Home

Domestic Dimensions

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Ellen Huijgh

This book is about the domestic dimension of public diplomacy, which must be understood within the context of public diplomacy’s evolution over time. In the virtually connected world of today, newcomers such as supranational organizations, sub-states and Asian countries have had less difficulty than Western nation-states including a domestic dimension in public diplomacy. Doing so does not separate the domestic and international components; rather, it highlights that there is a holistic/integrative approach to public involvement at home and abroad. In Huijgh’s comprehensive analysis, including case studies from North America, Europa and the Asia-Pacific, public diplomacy’s international and domestic dimensions can be seen as stepping stones on a continuum of public participation that is central to international policymaking and conduct.

Maritime Cooperation in Semi-Enclosed Seas

Asian and European Experiences

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Edited by Keyuan Zou

Maritime Cooperation in Semi-Enclosed Seas, edited by Keyuan Zou, brings together distinguished scholars to discuss how and to what extent Article 123 of the LOSC has been implemented in state practice in East Asia and Europe, and what kind of existing experiences can be observed and lessons drawn so as to promote maritime cooperation in semi-enclosed seas. An interdisciplinary approach has been taken to broaden the scope of discussion on how to strengthen the implementation of the LOSC.
The book is divided into four parts: “International Legal Framework for Semi-Enclosed Seas Cooperation,” “Cooperative Management of Marine Resources,” “Handling Non-Traditional Security Issues,” and “New Challenges to Semi-Enclosed Seas Cooperation.” In addition to general discussions on semi-enclosed seas, the volume offers special geographic coverage of the East China Sea and South China Sea in East Asia and the North Sea and Mediterranean Sea in Europe.

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Edited by Seokwoo Lee and Hee Eun Lee

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Edited by Seokwoo Lee and Hee Eun Lee

Launched in 1991, the Asian Yearbook of International Law is a major internationally-refereed yearbook dedicated to international legal issues as seen primarily from an Asian perspective. It is published under the auspices of the Foundation for the Development of International Law in Asia (DILA) in collaboration with DILA-Korea, the Secretariat of DILA, in South Korea. When it was launched, the Yearbook was the first publication of its kind, edited by a team of leading international law scholars from across Asia. It provides a forum for the publication of articles in the field of international law and other Asian international legal topics.

The objectives of the Yearbook are two-fold. First, to promote research, study and writing in the field of international law in Asia; and second, to provide an intellectual platform for the discussion and dissemination of Asian views and practices on contemporary international legal issues.

Each volume of the Yearbook contains articles and shorter notes; a section on Asian state practice; an overview of the Asian states’ participation in multilateral treaties and succinct analysis of recent international legal developments in Asia; a bibliography that provides information on books, articles, notes, and other materials dealing with international law in Asia; as well as book reviews. This publication is important for anyone working on international law and in Asian studies.

Regaining Paradise Lost: Indigenous Land Rights and Tourism

Using the UNGPs on Business and Human Rights in Mainstreaming Indigenous Land Rights in the Tourism Industry

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Mary Kristerie A. Baleva

Mary Kristerie A. Baleva’s Regaining Paradise Lost: Indigenous Land Rights and Tourism uses the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights as its overarching legal framework to analyze the intersections of indigenous land rights and the tourism industry. Drawing from treatises, treaties, and case law, it traces the development of indigenous rights discourse from the Age of Discovery to the adoption of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The book highlights the Philippines, home to a rich diversity of indigenous peoples, and a country that considers tourism as an important contributor to economic development. It chronicles the Ati Community’s 15-year struggle for recognition of their ancestral domains in Boracay Island, the region’s premiere beach destination.

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Linzhu Wang

In Self-determination and Minority Rights in China, Linzhu Wang examines the rights of China’s minorities from the perspective of self-determination. The book offers an insight into the ethnic issues in contemporary China, by examining the principle of self-determination in shaping China’s ethnic grouping and appraising the rights of the minorities and their limits. Based on a comprehensive survey of the practice of self-determination in the Chinese context and the Regional Ethnic Autonomy regime, the author seeks to answer the questions of how the ethnic policies and laws have come to be, why they are problematic, and what can be done to promote minority rights in China.

The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law

Volume 2, 2018 - Islamic Law and its Implementation in Asia and the Middle East

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Edited by Javaid Rehman and Ayesha Shahid

The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law aims to publish peer-reviewed scholarly articles and reviews as well as significant developments in human rights and humanitarian law. It examines international human rights and humanitarian law with a global reach, though its particular focus is on the Asian region.

The focused theme of Volume 2 is Islamic Law and its Implementation in Asia and the Middle East.

Historical Title, Self-Determination and the Kashmir Question

Changing Perspectives in International Law

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Fozia Nazir Lone

In Historical Title, Self-Determination and the Kashmir Question Fozia Nazir Lone offers a critical re-examination of the Kashmir question. Through an interdisciplinary approach and international law perspective, she analyses political practices and the substantive international law on the restoration of historical title and self-determination. The book analytically examines whether Kashmir was a State at any point in history; the effect of the 1947 occupation by India/Pakistan; the international law implications of the constitutional incorporation of this territory and the ongoing human rights violations; whether Kashmiris are entitled to restore their historical title through the exercise of self-determination; and whether the Kashmir question could be resolved with the formation of international strategic alliance to curb danger of spreading terrorism in Kashmir.

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Matthias Vanhullebusch

Global Governance, Conflict and China sheds a unique perspective on China’s normative behaviour in the realm of collective security, peacekeeping, arms control, the war on terror and post-conflict justice. This analysis engages with an Asian epistemological framework whose relational thought borrows from the context – space and time alike – that informs China’s principle-driven conduct on the international plane. Through the lens of relational governance, this work develops a new theory on the relational normativity of international law (TORNIL) that identifies the interdependent sources that underpin China’s international legal argument, i.e. norms, values and relationships. Without a fertile soil in which those conflicting relationships between share- and stakeholders can be rebuilt, international laws governing (post-conflict) violence cannot restore and maintain peace, humanity and accountability.