Creativities in Arts Education, Research and Practice

International Perspectives for the Future of Learning and Teaching

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Edited by Leon R. de Bruin, Pamela Burnard and Susan Davis

In Creativities in Arts Education, Research and Practice: International Perspectives for the Future of Learning and Teaching, Leon de Bruin, Pamela Burnard and Susan Davis provide new thinking, ideas and practices concerned with philosophically, pedagogically and actively developing arts learning and teaching. Interrogating successes and challenges for creativity education locally/globally/glocally, and using illustrative cases and examples drawn from education, practice and research, they explore unique local practices, agendas, glocalised perspectives and ways arts learning develops diverse creativities in order to produce new approaches and creative ecologies through inter- and cross-disciplinary teaching practices interconnecting beyond arts domains. This book highlights innovative approaches and perspectives to activating and promoting diverse creativities as new forms of authorship and analytic approaches within arts practice and education, along with the production of adaptable, sustainable pedagogies that promote and produce diverse creativities differently. This book will help educators, artists, and researchers understand and fully utilise ways they can transform their thinking and practice and keep their learning and teaching on the move.



Contributors are: Christine Bottrell, Pamela Burnard, Peter Cook. Susan Davis, Elizabeth Dobson, Leon R. de Bruin, Tatjana Dragovic, Martin Fautley, Robyn Heckenberg, Susanne Jasilek, Fiona King, Sharon Lierse, Shari Lindblom, Megan McPherson, Sarah Jane Moore, Amy Mortimer, Alison O'Grady, Mark Selkrig, Susan Wright.

#HipHopEd: The Compilation on Hip-hop Education

Volume 1: Hip-hop as Education, Philosophy, and Practice

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Edited by Christopher Emdin and Edmund S. Adjapong

The first volume of #HipHopEd: The Compilation on Hip-hop Education brings together veteran and emerging scholars, practitioners and students from a variety of fields to share their research and experiences as it relates to the use of hip-hop in educational spaces. This text extends the current literature on hip-hop and education and focuses on the philosophy of hip-hop and education, the impact that hip-hop culture has on the identity of educators, and the use of hip-hop to inform mental health practices. Through their personal and practical experiences, authors of this text will spark new and creative uses of hip-hop culture in educational spaces.

Dilemmas and Decisions

A Critical Addition to the Curriculum

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Patrick F. Miller

In Dilemmas and Decisions the author argues that dilemmas, medical, political and personal are clearly universal, requiring decisions with a painful choice. Nevertheless, we are witnessing an increasing tendency amongst opinion leaders, from management consultants to religious fundamentalists, to inform us that dilemmas either do not really exist or are merely problems awaiting the “right” solution (which they happen to possess).

Such moral certainty is dangerously mistaken, breeding extremism and undermining democratic values. Education can become a kind of preparation for Multiple Choice Question-type exams or TV quizzes, with facts recalled under pressure of time and problems needing fast solutions.

Problems, however, are different from dilemmas; they have solutions and disappear as soon as these are found. Dilemmas leave you with an aftertaste and a sense of regret about the rejected alternative.

A Man Comes from Someplace

Stories, History, Memory from a Lost Time. Second Edition

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Judith Pearl Summerfield

A Man Comes from Someplace is a story of a lost world, a story in history of a multi-generational Jewish family from a shtetl in Ukraine before WWI. As cultural study, the narrative draws upon the oral stories of the author’s father, family letters, eyewitness accounts, immigration papers, etc., and cultural research. The narrative becomes a transformative space to re-present story as performance, a meta-narrative, and an auto-ethnography for the author to reflect upon the effects of the stories on her own life, as daughter of a survivor, and as teacher/scholar. Summerfield raises questions about immigration, survival, resilience, place and identity, how story functions as antidote to trauma, a means of making sense of the world, and as resistance, the refusal to be silenced or erased, the insistence we know the past and remember those who came before. In 2011, she found her way back to the place her family came from in Ukraine. The book is now being read by students in their ESL classes in Novokoonstantinov, Ukraine.

Umesh Sharma, John Roodenburg and Steve Rayner

Winner! - 2016 Exceptionality Education International Book Prize Award. This award is for excellence in publishing in the area of special education for the year 2015.
This award-winning book explores thinking about teaching and learning as an educative process. It is about creating a positive learning environment for all students and is different from most other books on such a topic. It is written by three experienced teachers who as academics, in the pursuit of evidence-based practice, have progressed research and teaching in special education, educational psychology and leadership. To breathe life into what is too often presented as dry theory, they share a narrative of their working experiences.
This narrative takes us on a journey where we will meet different characters. It aims to empower the reader by illustrating a range of research driven strategies through the voices of the characters. The reader will hear the lived experiences of students, parents, new and experienced teachers, teacher assistants and school leaders. In their stories the authors seek to share helpful understandings of realistic ways that can address everyday challenges conducive to positive relationships, environments and learning.

Re-Rooting the Learning Space

Minding Where Children's Mathematics Grow

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Jennifer S. Thom

To understand a living system, such as a tree, in an ecologically systemic way involves more than simply reducing the tree down to its parts or by analyzing the tree from part to whole. Not only does one need to study the tree’s leaves, stems, branches, trunk, root system, and its interaction with the environment but from many vantage points to make sense of how each part exists in dynamic relationship with the others as an integrated system.
The same is true about the purpose of this book. It is not meant to be a recipe for how to teach mathematics well or to serve as simply a descriptive account of a teaching practice. It is in essence, a systemic exploration into the embeddedness and co-emergence of theory and practice in mathematics teaching.
This book is ideal for undergraduate and graduate courses in mathematics education and curriculum studies. With its up close and contextual forms of data and a variety of interpretive methods used for the analyses, this book is highly suitable for courses in research. The audience includes professors, teacher educators, and in-service teachers who are interested in ecological theories and how these inform mathematics teaching and learning.

Shaping the Story

A Guide to Facilitating Narrative Career Counselling

Edited by Kobus Maree

Current career counselling needs a shift away from the practice of modern counselling approaches, and narrative therapy is likely to be particularly appropriate, since it is part of the culture and way of life of the majority of our clients. For the very first time, current approaches have been brought together in one publication. Eminent scholars, including Larry Cochran, Mark Savickas, and Norm Amundson, Paul Hartung and John Winslade, contributed to the publication. Personal narratives of some exceptionally eminent people, including Robert Sternberg are also included. The publication is concluded by Reuven Bar-On and Maurice Elias, who delineate the connection between storied counselling and social and emotional learning.

This book provides a priceless resource for scholars, academics, researchers, psychologists, teachers and clients. It

§ critically analyses germane questions, such as "How vital and feasible is it to build on life stories in career counselling?"
§ examines the theoretical underpinnings and practical applications of hermeneutic-narrative, postmodern and constructivist approaches to career counselling
§ provides practical guidelines on the practice of narrative counselling in different contexts
§ presents ideas on how to engage clients actively
§ suggests ways of using life story counselling (including the Career-Story Interview) to produce new identities for career practice

Reforming Teaching and Learning

Comparative Perspectives in a Global Era

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Edited by Maria Teresa Tatto and Monica Mincu

This volume addresses the larger question of the effects of (global) educational reform on teaching and learning as they relate to the context, the policies and politics where reform occurs.
Maria Teresa Tatto and Monica Mincu bring together a group of leading scholars in the field representing a variety of national contexts and geographical areas. The chapters in the book raise crucial questions such as: What is the impact of globalization on local education systems and traditions? What roles do international agencies play? What is the role of the state? What is the role of policy networks? How do we understand the functions of quality assurance mechanisms, standards, competencies, and the “new” accountability? In doing so the chapters discuss the institutions and organization of education and how these shape what teachers learn and, eventually, teach to diverse populations.
The book uses a number of analytical frameworks and theoretical perspectives, from critical discourse analysis, regime theory, empirical exploration of teachers’ thinking and actions within school contexts, analysis of reform diffusion and global trends. Using analysis of the literature and relevant documents, case studies and diverse forms of survey research, this work offers a glimpse of the complexities that exist in the fields of teaching and learning.
This collection is also an occasion to observe the profile of knowledge production in these cultural contexts, the interplay between local and national research agendas and traveling policies around the world.

Edited by Xiangyun Du, Erik de Graaff and Anette Kolmos

The success of Problem Based Learning and Project Organised learning (PBL) as an educational method in the field of Higher Engineering Education is clear and beyond any doubt. An increasing number of Universities of Technology all over the world applies PBL in their curriculum. There are many sound arguments for changing to PBL, such as enhancing students’ motivation, integration of practice oriented competences, improved retention of students, augmenting the quality of education, collaboration with industry.
More and more educational research is supplying evidence to sustain these arguments. Engineers create innovations to improve the quality of our life. It just makes sense that the institutes of Higher Engineering Education want to know what educational innovations contribute to the quality of engineering education.
To promote research on PBL the UNESCO chair in Problem Based Learning in Engineering Education (UCPBL) organised the first Research Symposium on Problem Based Learning in Engineering and Science Education, June 30th-July 1st, 2008 at Aalborg University. This book contains a selection of papers from this research symposium, which have been reviewed and further developed.

Sustainable Improvement

Building Learning Communities that Endure

Coral Mitchell and Larry Sickney

Drawing on two decades of research into the nature of schools as learning communities, the authors build on a prior model of learning communities that integrated three domains of capacity: personal, interpersonal, and organizational. In this text, the authors move the capacity-building model into practice and elaborate a theory of learning communities.
This book situates learning communities in living systems and ecological perspectives. The fundamental premise is that all of human life and human activity is part of a deep planetary ecology of which mutuality and interdependence are cornerstone properties, learning and renewal are key processes, and emergent networks are foundational structures. The text juxtaposes these conceptions with educational practices in order to understand what makes practice different in learning community schools. The authors argue that sustainable educational improvement emerges from a reciprocal process of building people who are constantly learning, building commitments to authentic learning, and building schools with a relentless focus on learning. The authors conclude that building a sustainable learning community requires a profound shift in how learning is understood, discussed, valued, enabled, and expressed. This shift, they argue, is essential as schools face the challenges and opportunities in the knowledge society.