Umesh Sharma, John Roodenburg and Steve Rayner

Winner! - 2016 Exceptionality Education International Book Prize Award. This award is for excellence in publishing in the area of special education for the year 2015.
This award-winning book explores thinking about teaching and learning as an educative process. It is about creating a positive learning environment for all students and is different from most other books on such a topic. It is written by three experienced teachers who as academics, in the pursuit of evidence-based practice, have progressed research and teaching in special education, educational psychology and leadership. To breathe life into what is too often presented as dry theory, they share a narrative of their working experiences.
This narrative takes us on a journey where we will meet different characters. It aims to empower the reader by illustrating a range of research driven strategies through the voices of the characters. The reader will hear the lived experiences of students, parents, new and experienced teachers, teacher assistants and school leaders. In their stories the authors seek to share helpful understandings of realistic ways that can address everyday challenges conducive to positive relationships, environments and learning.

Narrative Constellations

Exploring Lived Experience in Education

Susanne Garvis

Narrative research in contemporary times can free social scientists from the rhetorical forms (Emihovich, 1995) that alienate children and families from their own traditions. Through the use of narrative we are able to recognise the power of subjectivity in allowing open dialogue and co-construction of meaning. Becoming comfortable with narrative research also means accepting ideas that the world has no fixed rules for assigning behaviour (Emihovich, 1995). This means that open dialogue is required to build consensus around shared meaning and to ensure the inclusion of multiple voices.
The book begins with a theoretical overview of narrative genre before focusing on narrative constellations. Three constellations are then shared with the reader. The final chapter provides ideas about the future of narrative constellation in research and the impact constellations can have for future policy and practice. It is hoped that the reader develops a better understanding of narrative ways and begins to see the potential of narrative constellations in the research genre.

Edited by Vaughan Prain, Peter Cox, Craig Deed, Debra Edwards, Cathleen Farrelly, Mary Keeffe, Valerie Lovejoy, Lucy Mow, Peter Sellings and Bruce Waldrip

How can widely acknowledged challenges facing regional secondary schools with high concentrations of low SES students, ineffectual curricula, and poor levels of student engagement, attendance, and wellbeing, be addressed? In this book we report on key outcomes of the Bendigo Education Plan that aimed to improve the academic attainment and wellbeing of 3000 regional secondary students. This Plan entailed rebuilding four Years 7-10 colleges, and developing a differentiated and personalised curriculum, with teachers team-teaching in open-plan settings. We analyse how and why teachers and students adapted to these new practices. We focus on both generic changes in the schools, around the use of ICTs and the organisation of the curriculum, and on specific approaches to teaching and learning in English, mathematics, science, social studies and studio arts. This book provides research-based guidelines on how the curriculum can be renewed and enacted effectively in these and like schools.
In analysing a large-scale attempt to address the challenge of making learning personalised and meaningful for this cohort of students, our book addresses larger questions about quality secondary curriculum and successful teacher professional learning support.

Playing in a House of Mirrors

Applied Theatre as Reflective Practice

Edited by Elinor Vettraino and Warren Linds

This book explores the concept of reflection through a dramaturgical lens as practitioners in a wide range of disciplines hold up the mirror to their own practice using theatre and theatricality as a way of unpacking their individual and collective practice. Editors and authors consider the use of drama as the vehicle through which learning takes place for the leader, facilitator or manager of an experience rather than the use of drama and theatre as a tool for learning subject content.
Reflective practice is an often cited term in the professional thesaurus of educators, social work practitioners and health care workers. It is perhaps less commonly thought of as the purview of leaders of industry, marketing managers and scientists. We define reflective practice in this context as the development of capacities to reflect on actions, behaviours and attitudes that impact on your own practice, or on the way others engage in their practice, so as to be part of a process of continuous learning. It is therefore crucial for any professional to understand how and why we behave and interact with others the way we do.
Cover art: Vestige (© Rob Mulholland, 2012)
www. robmullholland. co. uk

Research Informing the Practice of Museum Educators

Diverse Audiences, Challenging Topics, and Reflective Praxis

Edited by David Anderson, Alex de Cosson and Lisa McIntosh

Museums are institutions of both education and learning in service of society, that is, they are sites where educational experiences are designed and facilitated, and also places where visitors learn in broad and diverse ways. As such, the role of public education in museums today is highly important, if not at the centre of museum activity.

As museums contemplate the growing significance of their educational roles and mandate within a changing society, so too they are increasingly in need of information about the audiences they serve and their own professional practice as they strive to achieve their educational missions in service to the communities in which they are embedded.

Accordingly, this edited book focuses on informing, broadening and enhancing the pedagogy of museum education and the practices of museum educators. The chapters in this book report independent research studies conducted by the authors who have explored and investigated a variety of issues affecting museum education practice, contextualized across a range of institutions, including art galleries, natural and social history museums, anthropology museums, science centres, and gardens.
These studies address a cross-section of contemporary issues confronting the field of museum education including studies of diverse audiences and their needs, the mediation of challenging topics, professional training, teaching and learning in informal settings, and reflective practice and praxis. Together these themes represent a set of topical issues germane to informing, broadening and enhancing educational practices in diverse museum settings, and will be of considerable interest to a broad spectrum of the museum and non-formal education fields.

Teaching for Learning and Learning for Teaching

Peer Review of Teaching in Higher Education

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Edited by Christopher Klopper and Steve Drew

Teaching for Learning and Learning for Teaching focuses on the emerging global governmental and institutional agenda about higher education teaching quality and the role that peer review can play in supporting improvements in teaching and student outcomes. This agenda is a pervasive element of the further development of higher education internationally through activities of governments, global agencies, institutions of higher education, discrete disciplines, and individual teachers. Many universities have adopted student evaluations as a mechanism to appraise the quality of teaching. These evaluations can be understood as providing a “customer-centric” portrait of quality; and, when used as the sole arbiter of teaching performance they do not instil confidence in the system of evaluation by academic teaching staff. Providing peer perspectives as counterpoint, whether in a developmental or summative form, goes some way to alleviating this imbalance and is the impetus for the resurgence of interest in peer review and observation of teaching. This book seeks to recognise cases of peer review of teaching in Higher Education to affirm best practices and identify areas that require improvement in establishing local, national and international benchmarks of teaching quality.

Edited by Vaughan Prain, Peter Cox, Craig Deed, Debra Edwards, Cathleen Farrelly, Mary Keeffe, Valerie Lovejoy, Lucy Mow, Peter Sellings, Bruce Waldrip and Zali Yager

In recent years many countries have built or renovated schools incorporating open plan design. These new spaces are advocated on the basis of claims that they promote fresh, productive ways to teach and learn that address the needs of students in this century, resulting in improved academic and well-being outcomes. These new approaches include teachers planning and teaching in teams, grouping students more flexibly, developing more coherent and comprehensive curricula, personalising student learning experiences, and providing closer teacher-student relationships. In this book we report on a three-year study of six low SES Years 7—10 secondary schools in regional Victoria, Australia, where staff and students adapted to these new settings. In researching this transitional phase, we focused on the practical reasoning of school leaders, teachers and students in adapting organisational, pedagogical, and curricular structures to enable sustainable new learning environments. We report on approaches across the different schools to structural organisation of students in year-level groupings, distributed leadership, teacher and pre-service teacher professional learning, student advocacy and wellbeing, use of techno-mediated learning, personalising student learning experiences, and curriculum design and enactment.
We found that these new settings posed significant challenges for teachers and students and that successful adaptation depended on many interconnected factors. We draw out the implications for successful adaptation in other like settings.

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Edited by Frederick Koon Shing Leung, Kyungmee Park, Derek Holton and David Clarke

Utilizing the LPS dataset, Algebra Teaching around the World documents eighth grade algebra teaching across a variety of countries that differ geographically and culturally. Different issues in algebra teaching are reported, and different theories are used to characterize algebra lessons or to compare algebra teaching in different countries. Many commonalities in algebra teaching around the world are identified, but there are also striking and deep-rooted differences. The different ways algebra was taught in different countries point to how algebra teaching may be embedded in the culture and the general traditions of mathematics education of the countries concerned. In particular, a comparison is made between algebra lessons in the Confucian-Heritage Culture (CHC) countries and ‘Western’ countries. It seems that a common emphasis of algebra teaching in CHC countries is the ‘linkage’ or ‘coherence’ of mathematics concepts, both within an algebraic topic and between topics. On the other hand, contemporary algebra teaching in many Western school systems places increasing emphasis on the use of algebra in mathematical modeling in ‘real world’ contexts and in the instructional use of metaphors, where meaning construction is assisted by invoking contexts outside the domain of algebraic manipulation, with the intention of helping students to form connections between algebra and other aspects of their experience.

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Edited by Susanne Weber, Fritz K. Oser, Frank Achtenhagen, Michael Fretschner and Sandra Trost

This book provides new insights into the important field of Entrepreneurship Education. The editors pick up Fayolle’s invitation: “How can we learn from ‘institutional’ culture?” and translate it to a variety of aspects of learning to start-up. From the perspective of Human Resource Education and Management (Wirtschaftspädagogik) the authors shed light into the socio-cultural system of entrepreneurship education. They start with mapping out its challenges. They discuss context factors like political regimes affecting entrepreneurial activities, consider goals including moral awareness, introduce ideas of modeling entre- and intrapreneurial competencies, suggest teaching-learning-strategies, discuss evaluation procedures and introduce case studies of entrepreneurship education in different countries for different study levels. All in all this book stimulates and supports the challenges of educators, students, and practitioners (human resource managers, consultants, principals, teachers, and trainers) to introduce into the varying contexts of entrepreneurship education content specific, procedural, causal elements necessary for starting and maintaining an enterprise.

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Edited by Hannah R. Gerber and Sandra Schamroth Abrams

Bridging Literacies with Videogames provides an international perspective of literacy practices, gaming culture, and traditional schooling. Featuring studies from Australia, Colombia, South Korea, Canada, and the United States, this edited volume addresses learning in primary, secondary, and tertiary environments with topics related to:
re-creating worlds and texts
massive multiplayer second language learning
videogames and classroom learning
These diverse topics will provide scholars, teachers, and curriculum developers with empirical support for bringing videogames into classroom spaces to foster meaning making. Bridging Literacies with Videogames is an essential text for undergraduates, graduates, and faculty interested in contemporizing learning with the medium of the videogame.