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Series:

Ruben Moi

Paul Muldoon and the Language of Poetry is the first book in years that attends to the entire oeuvre of the Irish-American poet, critic, lyricist, dramatist and Princeton professor from his debut with New Weather in 1973 up to his very recent publications. Ruben Moi’s book explores, in correspondence with language philosophy and critical debate, how Muldoon’s ingenious language and inventive form give shape and significance to his poetry, and how his linguistic panache and technical verve keep language forever surprising, new and alive.

The Brand of Print

Marketing Paratexts in the Early English Book Trade

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Andrea Silva

The Brand of Print offers a comprehensive analysis of the ways printers, publishers, stationers, and booksellers designed paratexts to market printed books as cultural commodities. This study traces envoys to the reader, visual design in title pages and tables of contents, and patron dedications, illustrating how the agents of print branded their markets by crafting relationships with readers and articulating the value of their labor in an increasingly competitive trade. Applying terms from contemporary marketing theory to the study of early modern paratexts, Andie Silva encourages a consideration of how print agents' labor and agency, made visible through paratextual design, continues to influence how we read, study, and digitize early modern texts.

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Heather McAlpine

In this book, Heather McAlpine argues that emblematic strategies play a more central role in Pre-Raphaelite poetics than has been acknowledged, and that reading Pre-Raphaelite works with an awareness of these strategies permits a new understanding of the movement’s engagements with ontology, religion, representation, and politics. The emblem is a discursive practice that promises to stabilize language in the face of doubt, making it especially interesting as a site of conflicting responses to Victorian crises of representation. Through analyses of works by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Christina Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Gerard Manley Hopkins, A.C. Swinburne, and William Morris, Emblematic Strategies examines the Pre-Raphaelite movement’s common goal of conveying “truth” while highlighting differences in its adherents’ approaches to that task.

Green Matters

Ecocultural Functions of Literature

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Edited by Maria Löschnigg and Melanie Braunecker

Green Matters offers a fascinating insight into the regenerative function of literature with regard to environmental concerns. Based on recent developments in ecocriticism, the book demonstrates how the aesthetic dimension of literary texts makes them a vital force in the struggle for sustainable futures. Applying this understanding to individual works from a number of different thematic fields, cultural contexts and literary genres, Green Matters presents novel approaches to the manifold ways in which literature can make a difference. While the first sections of the book highlight the transnational, the focus on Canada in the last section allows a more specific exploration of how themes, genres and literary forms develop their own manifestations within a national context. Through its unifying ecocultural focus and its variegated approaches, the volume is an essential contribution to contemporary environmental humanities.

The Transformations of Tragedy

Christian Influences from Early Modern to Modern

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Edited by Fionnuala O’Neill Tonning, Erik Tonning and Jolyon Mitchell

The Transformations of Tragedy: Christian Influences from Early Modern to Modern explores the influence of Christian theology and culture upon the development of post-classical Western tragedy. The volume is divided into three parts: early modern, modern, and contemporary. This series of essays by established and emergent scholars offers a sustained study of Christianity’s creative influence upon experimental forms of Western tragic drama.
Both early modern and modern tragedy emerged within periods of remarkable upheaval in Church history, yet Christianity’s diverse influence upon tragedy has too often been either ignored or denounced by major tragic theorists. This book contends instead that the history of tragedy cannot be sufficiently theorised without fully registering the impact of Christianity in transition towards modernity.

Aphoristic Modernity

1880 to the Present

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Edited by Kostas Boyiopoulos and Michael Shallcross

For the first time in scholarship, this essay collection interprets modernity through the literary micro-genres of the aphorism, the epigram, the maxim, and the fragment. Situating Friedrich Nietzsche and Oscar Wilde as forerunners of modern aphoristic culture, the collection analyses the relationship between aphoristic consciousness and literary modernism in the expanded purview of the long twentieth century, through the work of a wide range of authors, including Samuel Beckett, Max Beerbohm, Jorge Luis Borges, Katherine Mansfield, and Stevie Smith. From the romantic fragment to the tweet, Aphoristic Modernity offers a compelling exploration of the short form's pervasive presence both as a standalone artefact and as part of a larger textual and cultural matrix.

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Joshua Richards

In T. S. Eliot’s Ascetic Ideal, Joshua Richards charts an intellectual history of T. S. Eliot’s interaction with asceticism. This history is drawn from Eliot’s own education in the topic with the texts he read integrated into detailed textual analysis. Eliot’s early encounters with the ascetic ideal began a lifetime of interplay and reflection upon self-denial, purgation, and self-surrender. In 1909, he began a study of mysticism, likely, in George Santayana’s seminar, and thereafter showed the influence of this education. Yet, his interaction with the ascetic ideal and his background in mysticism was not a simple thing; still, his early cynicism was slowly transformed to an embrace.

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Edited by Jane Beal

In Illuminating Jesus in the Middle Ages, editor Jane Beal and other scholars analyse the reception history of images and ideas about Jesus in medieval cultures (6th–15th c.). They consider representations of Jesus in the liturgy of the medieval church, Psalters and psalm commentaries, bestiaries, the Glossa ordinaria, and Middle English vitae Christi as well as among the English, the Irish, and Europeans, adherents to the cult of the Holy Name, participants in the Feast of Corpus Christi, and medieval contemplatives, including Bede, Theophylact of Ochrid, Saint Francis, Gertrude the Great, Dante, Julian of Norwich, and medieval English and European visionaries, among others.
Contributors are Jane Beal, George Hardin Brown, Aaron Canty, Tomás Ó Cathasaigh, Thomas Cattoi, Andrew Galloway, Julia Bolton Holloway, Michael Kuczynski, Rob Lutton, Vittorio Montemaggi, Paul Patterson, Linda Stone, Lesley Sullivan, Larry Swain, Donna Trembinski, Nancy van Deusen, and Barbara Zimbalist.

Poetik der Nation

Englishness in der englischen Romantik

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Ulrike Kristina Köhler

This comparative study focuses on the manifestations of Englishness in various literary genres of English Romanticism. Political essays, travelogues, the Gothic novel and balladry are scrutinized from a production-oriented and context-sensitive perspective and through an imagological lens. This book centres around the interplay between national stereotypes and genre-specific (and nationally unspecific) tropes and conventions. Attention is given to the implied reader, cultural knowledge, the narrative situation and to focalization, as well as lyric-specific elements. The book demonstrates how narratology, cultural memory studies, reception theory, rhetoric and text linguistics can be integrated more effectively into the toolkit of imagology. This will allow national images to be deconstructed in a more fine-grained manner.

Diese vergleichende Fallstudie richtet den Blick auf die Erscheinungsformen von Englishness in Gattungen der englischen Romantik. Aus einer produktionsästhetischen wie kontextbewussten Perspektive legt sie den politischen Essay, den Reisebericht, die Gothic novel und die Ballade unter das imagologische Mikroskop. Dabei gilt das Interesse dem Zusammenspiel von nationalen Stereotypen und Topoi mit Gattungselementen ohne nationale Konnotation. Der Adressat, kulturelles Wissen, Erzählsituation und Fokalisierung sowie lyrikspezifische Elemente stehen dabei im Fokus. In theoretischer Hinsicht zeigt dieses Buch, wie sich das Handwerkszeug der Narratologie, der kulturwissenschaftlichen Gedächtnisforschung, der Rezeptionsästhetik, der Rhetorik und der Textlinguistik weit stärker als bisher gewinnbringend in das Analyseinstrumentarium der Imagologie integrieren lässt. So lassen sich nationenbezogene Bilder zukünftig nuancierter nachzeichnen und im Zuge dessen besser dekonstruieren.

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Edited by Joel Kuortti, Kaisa Ilmonen, Elina Valovirta and Janne Korkka

What grows out of the ordinary? This volume focuses on that which has been regarded as ordinary, self-evident and formulaic in literary and cultural phenomena such as diasporic cuisine, pet adoption narratives, Prairie writing, romance between stepsiblings, the program of a political party, and everyday shopping in poetry. The book argues that by engaging with that which is perceived as ordinary we also gain understanding of how otherness becomes defined and constituted. The volume seeks new ways to access that which might lie in-between or beyond the opposition between exploitation and emancipation, and contests the hegemonic logic of revealing oppression and rebuilding liberation in contemporary critical theory to create new ways of knowing which grow out of the ordinary.