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Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

This examines the papyrus books collected by Plato himself, a habit which began when he was still 'studying' under Socrates and continued throughout his years of teaching in the Academy. The book deals extensively with the works of the Ionian and Eleatic Natural Philosophers, as well as of the Pyhagoreans, which informed the composition of Plato's Dialogues. Furthermore, through this process the fabric of Sophistic literature composed at Athens is unfolded and the pioneers who introduced the study of Mathematics in the Academy are discussed in brief. Finally, a large chapter in the book deals with the architecture of the Academy, including topographical surveys and scale plans which reveal interesting facts about the ideas that went into its design, and the use of its facilities.

Ryan Twomey

'The Child is Father of the Man'discusses the field of nineteenth-century Juvenilia. Specifically, the development of the child writer into the adult author, arguing for increased critical attention toward the early works of now famous writers.
The introductory chapter reviews the role of juvenilia in the writing progression of famous authors and provides a discussion of current academic scholarship in the field of juvenilia. The book then focuses on the individual literary progressions of the nineteenth-century British writers William Harrison Ainsworth, Emily Brontë, and George Eliot, and the Anglo-Irish writer, Maria Edgeworth. The analysis in each chapter has been contextualised within the historical, regional, gothic and lyric modes, and includes an interdisciplinary study in the fields of history, biography, and languages and linguistics. Each chapter is provided as an individual case study espousing the importance of the juvenilia on the development of the later, more publicised, authorship. The concluding chapter discusses the future of the genre with reference to the discoveries outlined in the text, and juxtaposes these findings with the perceived neglect juvenilia has received from the academic community.

Engraving and Etching, 1400-2000

A History of the Development of Manual Intaglio Printmaking Processes

Ad Stijnman

This book surveys the history of the techniques of engraving, etching and plate printing – i.e. that of manual intaglio printmaking processes – from its beginning in the 1430s until today. These developments are observed in the light of the coherence between the technique of the intaglio print (such as its materials and methods of production); the 'style' or outward appearance of the print; the creator of the print; and the fashion typical of a particular social group, place and time. Economic, educational and social aspects are discussed, as well as the worldwide dissemination of the trade of intaglio printmaking.
The author shows how intaglio printmaking developed steadily from the mid-fifteenth century, with the invention of the roller press and the etching of printing plates. By 1525 intaglio printmaking techniques could be said to have reached maturity and spread east and west following the European trade routes and colonisation. Further developments in plate-making resulted from a series of inventions and reinventions. After the abolition of the guilds on the European continent around 1800, and the introduction of photography and the expansion of the graphic industry, the engraving of images became a mere mechanical procedure. The handcrafted print made way for the large-scale mechanised graphic industry which emerged in the middle of the nineteenth century. Consequently artist-etchers withdrew to an elite position to concentrate on the manual aspects of printmaking, which is the situation today.
This comprehensively illustrated study is the first of its kind to cover all elements of the trade of engraving and etching throughout six centuries. Based on an exhaustive number of primary sources it will be an essential resource for collectors, curators, conservators, printmakers and students of technical art history.

Finding their Way at Sea

The Story of the Portolan Charts, the Cartographers Who Drew Them and the Mariners Who Sailed by Them

Richard Pflederer

With an introduction by Tony Campbell.
The story of sea charts, of manuscript portolan charts in particular, is a story intimately intertwined with the history of the western world during some of the most significant and eventful periods of recorded history. Through these astonishingly beautiful and functional charts, we can trace developments in trade and warfare, exploration and colonial domination from the late medieval period through the Renaissance and into the Age of European Enlightenment.
Beginning with their introduction in the late thirteenth century, these sometimes quaintly fanciful portolan charts enjoyed an important place in the navigator's sea chest until they were finally superceded in the eighteenth century by their cheaper but far less charming printed cousins. In the mid-fifteenth century when the Europeans first ventured beyond their home waters and into the open oceans, their successes and their sometimes-heroic failures were documented on charts of the newly discovered oceans and coasts. These new charts, although depicting faraway coasts and employing the latest navigational techniques, were drawn on vellum in the same style as Mediterranean Sea charts. They served the dual purposes of recording information gleaned from previous voyages and guiding the mariners of subsequent voyages.

The History of the Library in Western Civilization, Volume V

From Petrarch to Michelangelo: The Revival of the Study of the Classics and the First Humanistic Libraries Printing in the Service of the World of Books and Monumental Libraries

Series:

Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

In this fifth volume, the author writes about the re-evaluation of the ancient world: this set in motion a quest for the surviving works of ancient Greek and Latin literature, most of which were to be found in monastic libraries. He discusses the new schools and scholarly circles that were formed to promote the spread of Greek and Latin literature, especially philosophical works, and the emergence from them of the first humanistic libraries. He evokes the character of the libraries belonging to patrons of literature and the arts, such as Matthias Corvinus, the Vatican, the Medici family, the Dukes of Urbino and François I, among many others. Finally, there is an excellent treatise and circumstantial account of the invention of printing, which changed the scene as regards the dissemination of books and the formation of libraries in such a way that the world of books during the Renaissance witnessed a return to the state of affairs existing under the Roman emperors from Augustus to Hadrian.

Japoniæ insulæ: The Mapping of Japan

A Historical Introduction and Cartobibliography of European Printed Maps of Japan before 1800

Series:

Jason C. Hubbard

Japoniæ insulæ: The Mapping of Japan systematically categorizes and provides an overview of all the European printed maps of Japan published to 1800. The author has undertaken a review of the literature, conducted an exhaustive investigation in major libraries and private collections, analyzed these findings and then compiled information on 125 maps of Japan. The introduction contains information about the mapping to 1800, the typology of Japan by western cartographers, an overview on geographical names on early modern western maps of Japan and a presentation of the major cartographic models developed for this book.

In English with Japanese summary.

Koeman's Atlantes Neerlandici. New Edition. Vol. IV A (2 Vols.)

The "Galérie agréable du monde" by Pieter van der Aa (1728)

Series:

Peter C.J. van der Krogt

This latest part of the Koeman's Atlantes Neerlandici series contains the description of one single "atlas" only: the Galérie agréable du monde, published by Pieter van der Aa in Leiden in 1728. The work is described page-by-page in the form of a catalogue. Every description is accompanied by a small photo. Large-format digital photographs of all the sheets – both textual and graphic – have been placed on the accompanying DVD, so that this volume is in effect a digital facsimile of the Galérie agréable.
In two volumes.

Mapping Greece, 1420-1800: A History

Maps in the Margarita Samourkas Collection

George Tolias

Mapping Greeceis a richly illustrated history of the cartography of Greece during the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, based on the Margarita Samourka Map Collection (one of the most important collections of its kind in private hands in Greece) that consists of 1,700 maps of Greece. Divided into five chapters, the book contains an introduction, conclusions, and an appendix.
Summarizing the foundations of the mapping of Greece as established by the classical and medieval cartographic tradition with the Ptolemaic revival, the maritime portolan chart, the mappa mundi, and the local cartography of early humanism, this book shows the rise and development of the regional concept of Greece and its establishment of cartographic conventions. Various chapters discuss the standardization of the regional maps of Greece in "the age of the atlas," an era of commercialization of the printed map, and the wide dissemination of these maps. Four prefaces written by George Tolias, Paschallis M. Kitromildes, Christos G. Zacharakis, and Margarita Samourkas discuss each one's thoughts on this ambitious and comprehensive project.
Also discussed is the application of modern surveying technology to the mapping of Greece, the work of astronomers and mariners, topographical commentaries, and the production of maps of ancient geography and historical maps of Greece from the end of the sixteenth century onwards. Richly illustrated in a large format, with an overwhelming number of beautiful maps illustrations, Mapping Greece contains a detailed catalogue of the maps in the Margarita Samourka collection compiled by Leonora Navari. The Margarita Samourka collection includes maps of all parts of Greece and of historical Greek regions. It is significant for its breadth and its chronological development beginning with Italian map engravers and publishers of the sixteenth century to the French reformation of cartography in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Finally, the book provides an overall summary of the series of definitions and perceptions of Greece which emerge in the maps of the region during the centuries of foreign domination, and an assessment of the contribution of maps of Greece to the general history of cartography.

Hendrik D.L. Vervliet

In the course of the early sixteenth century the printed book decoration underwent a double metamorphosis. First stylistically, through the replacement of the previous medieval mostly floral embellishments by new motifs copied from Islamic or Byzantine sources, or borrowed from antiquity. Second technically, by the gradual inclusion of cast ornaments into the printer's bills-of-fount. They increasingly replaced the prestigious, sumptuous and time-consuming hand-painted illumination and decoration, or the less costly and sometimes crude woodcut techniques.
This survey focuses on one pattern of these Renaissance ornaments, namely the vine leaf, or as it is commonly known, the "Aldine" leaf. The design is also known as an ivy leaf or, as palaeographers and some typographers call it, a hedera or floral heart.
As a cast sort the vine leaf was introduced in the early sixteenth-century. It became rapidly one of the most favoured decorative designs in Renaissance typography and has remained a steadfast sort in a printer's case since then. The motif has mainly been studied from a designer's point of view, but a more bibliographically oriented survey seems to be missing. To fill up this void this survey aims to register all sixteenth-century sorts known.
Next to a facsimile in true scale, the bibliography contains the punchcutter's name, the size, occurrences, type-specimens, preserved artefacts and notes.

Women in Revolutionary Debate

Female Novelists from Burney to Austen

Stephanie Russo

In the later eighteenth and earlier nineteenth centuries novels were believed to have the power to shape and/or change behaviour, and, by implication, affect the political landscape of society on a large scale. The English response to the French Revolution can be traced through a reading of the novels of the period. The French Revolution in itself was indelibly associated with the domestic arena, and, thus, by extension, with women. Again and again in novels of the period, and particularly in women's novels, the stability, or otherwise, of the family reflects the stability of government and of the nation. It was through the medium of the novel that women could enter the debate on revolution, using their novels as means through which to explore many of the dominant social and political issues of the day.
The novel, more often than not set in the family home, was a medium uniquely suited to an exploration of revolutionary ideologies in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The emerging form of the novel offered a unique opportunity for women to present new, challenging perspectives on the revolutionary crisis of the 1790s. The works of Frances Burney, Charlotte Smith, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Robinson, Maria Edgeworth, Mrs Bullock and Jane Austen, all occupy an important place in this debate, and indeed, in the history of the novel. They demonstrate that women were at the forefront of development of the form of the novel itself.