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Series:

Günter Schilder

This is the last and final volume in the series Monumenta Cartographica Neerlandica. This serie is the result of the author's investigations, carried out during the past thirty years in numerous Dutch and foreign collections. In this way rare cartographic material is now more easily accessible. The work is monumental in every respect, and it is indispensable for private as well as public reference collections.
This volume focuses exclusively on the work of Hessel Gerritsz. (c. 1581-1632), who ranks among the most important and influential cartographers of the early-seventeenth-century Amsterdam. He started his career in Willem Jansz. Blaeu's workshop. About 1608 he established himself as an independent engraver, mapmaker and printer. A selection of his maps has been described and reproduced in full size and his position as chart-maker of the Dutch East and West India Company is discussed in detail.
To present an easier access to the whole series, a general index on names, maps and a dozen thematic subjects of all the nine volumes has been compiled. This index volume is included.

Series:

Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

This extensive index on all five volumes of The History of the Library in Western Civilization will identify all proper names, places and subjects covered in this comprehensive and scholarly series. Also, as one of the most definitive bibliographies on books about library history, it will list more than 6.000 entries.

Series:

Ina Kok

Winner of the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography (2018)
Winner of the 2015 Menno Hertzberger Prize for Book History and Bibliography

The aims of this publication are twofold. In the first place it gives a complete census of the woodcuts in Dutch and Flemish incunabula, and a record of all places in which they appear. Both the book in which the woodcut (or series of woodcuts) appears for the first time and all repetitions of that woodcut before 1501 have been registered. In the second place a survey and analysis of the woodcuts used by each printer have been given. With this inventory dr. Kok has developed a very accurate dating system for incunabula. Over 3800 different illustrations have been found in the incunabula printed in the Low Countries, which illustrate the history of the use of woodcuts – the different states, the different stages of wear and tear.

This publication was made possible with the cooperation of many libraries and institutions worldwide:
Stichting Huis Bergh, 's-Heerenberg, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet, Antwerpen, Belgium (UNESCO Werelderfgoed); Ruusbroec-Genootschap, Antwerpen, Belgium; Erfgoedbibliotheek Hendrik Consience, Antwerpen, Belgium; Staatsbibliothek, Berlin, Germany; Bibliothèque Municipale, Besançon, France; Bibliothèque Royale Albert Ier, Bruxelles, Belgium; University Library, Cambridge, England; Universitätsbibliothek, Köln, Germany; Kongelige Biblioteket, Kopenhagen, Denmark; Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Darmstadt, Germany; Stadsarchief en Athenaeumbibliotheek, Deventer, Netherlands; Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland; Universitätsbibliothek, Frankfurt, Germany; Universitätsbibliothek, Freiburg, Germany; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Gent, Belgium; Niedersächsische Staats- und Unversitätsbibliothek, Göttingen, Germany; Librije, Gouda, Netherlands; Unversitätsbibliothek, Greifswald, Germany; Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands; Gemeente Archief, Haarlem, Netherlands; Stadsbibliotheek, Haarlem, Netherlands; Harvard College Library, Cambridge MA, USA; Houghton Library, Cambridge MA, USA; Friesch Genootschap, Leeuwarden, Netherlands; Erfgoed Leiden en omstreken, Leiden, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Leiden, Netherlands; Bibliothèque de l'Université, Liège, Belgium; British Library, London, England; Universitätsbibliothek, Lüneburg, Germany; Regionaal historisch centrum Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands; Draiflessen Collection (Liberna Collection), Mettingen, Germany; Koninklijk Zeeuwsch Genootschap der Wetenschappen, Middelburg, Netherlands; Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München, Germany; Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Münster, Germany; Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven CT, USA; Morgan Library, New York NY, USA; Bibliothek des Evangelischen Predigerseminars Wittenberg, Germany; Bodleian Library, Oxford, England; Bibliothèque Mazarine, Paris, France; Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, France; Huntington Library, San Marino CA, USA; Universitetsbibliothek, Stockholm, Sweden; Württembergische Landesbibliothek, Stuttgart, Germany; Royal Dutch Library, The Hague, Netherlands; Universitätsbibliothek, Trier, Germany; Universitetsbibliothek, Uppsala, Sweden; Rijksmuseum Catharijne Convent, Utrecht, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Utrecht, Netherlands; Bibliothèque Municipale, Valenciennes, France; Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection, Library of Congress, Washington DC, USA.

Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

This examines the papyrus books collected by Plato himself, a habit which began when he was still 'studying' under Socrates and continued throughout his years of teaching in the Academy. The book deals extensively with the works of the Ionian and Eleatic Natural Philosophers, as well as of the Pyhagoreans, which informed the composition of Plato's Dialogues. Furthermore, through this process the fabric of Sophistic literature composed at Athens is unfolded and the pioneers who introduced the study of Mathematics in the Academy are discussed in brief. Finally, a large chapter in the book deals with the architecture of the Academy, including topographical surveys and scale plans which reveal interesting facts about the ideas that went into its design, and the use of its facilities.

Ryan Twomey

'The Child is Father of the Man'discusses the field of nineteenth-century Juvenilia. Specifically, the development of the child writer into the adult author, arguing for increased critical attention toward the early works of now famous writers.
The introductory chapter reviews the role of juvenilia in the writing progression of famous authors and provides a discussion of current academic scholarship in the field of juvenilia. The book then focuses on the individual literary progressions of the nineteenth-century British writers William Harrison Ainsworth, Emily Brontë, and George Eliot, and the Anglo-Irish writer, Maria Edgeworth. The analysis in each chapter has been contextualised within the historical, regional, gothic and lyric modes, and includes an interdisciplinary study in the fields of history, biography, and languages and linguistics. Each chapter is provided as an individual case study espousing the importance of the juvenilia on the development of the later, more publicised, authorship. The concluding chapter discusses the future of the genre with reference to the discoveries outlined in the text, and juxtaposes these findings with the perceived neglect juvenilia has received from the academic community.

Engraving and Etching, 1400-2000

A History of the Development of Manual Intaglio Printmaking Processes

Ad Stijnman

This book surveys the history of the techniques of engraving, etching and plate printing – i.e. that of manual intaglio printmaking processes – from its beginning in the 1430s until today. These developments are observed in the light of the coherence between the technique of the intaglio print (such as its materials and methods of production); the 'style' or outward appearance of the print; the creator of the print; and the fashion typical of a particular social group, place and time. Economic, educational and social aspects are discussed, as well as the worldwide dissemination of the trade of intaglio printmaking.
The author shows how intaglio printmaking developed steadily from the mid-fifteenth century, with the invention of the roller press and the etching of printing plates. By 1525 intaglio printmaking techniques could be said to have reached maturity and spread east and west following the European trade routes and colonisation. Further developments in plate-making resulted from a series of inventions and reinventions. After the abolition of the guilds on the European continent around 1800, and the introduction of photography and the expansion of the graphic industry, the engraving of images became a mere mechanical procedure. The handcrafted print made way for the large-scale mechanised graphic industry which emerged in the middle of the nineteenth century. Consequently artist-etchers withdrew to an elite position to concentrate on the manual aspects of printmaking, which is the situation today.
This comprehensively illustrated study is the first of its kind to cover all elements of the trade of engraving and etching throughout six centuries. Based on an exhaustive number of primary sources it will be an essential resource for collectors, curators, conservators, printmakers and students of technical art history.

Finding their Way at Sea

The Story of the Portolan Charts, the Cartographers Who Drew Them and the Mariners Who Sailed by Them

Richard Pflederer

With an introduction by Tony Campbell.
The story of sea charts, of manuscript portolan charts in particular, is a story intimately intertwined with the history of the western world during some of the most significant and eventful periods of recorded history. Through these astonishingly beautiful and functional charts, we can trace developments in trade and warfare, exploration and colonial domination from the late medieval period through the Renaissance and into the Age of European Enlightenment.
Beginning with their introduction in the late thirteenth century, these sometimes quaintly fanciful portolan charts enjoyed an important place in the navigator's sea chest until they were finally superceded in the eighteenth century by their cheaper but far less charming printed cousins. In the mid-fifteenth century when the Europeans first ventured beyond their home waters and into the open oceans, their successes and their sometimes-heroic failures were documented on charts of the newly discovered oceans and coasts. These new charts, although depicting faraway coasts and employing the latest navigational techniques, were drawn on vellum in the same style as Mediterranean Sea charts. They served the dual purposes of recording information gleaned from previous voyages and guiding the mariners of subsequent voyages.

The History of the Library in Western Civilization, Volume V

From Petrarch to Michelangelo: The Revival of the Study of the Classics and the First Humanistic Libraries Printing in the Service of the World of Books and Monumental Libraries

Series:

Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

In this fifth volume, the author writes about the re-evaluation of the ancient world: this set in motion a quest for the surviving works of ancient Greek and Latin literature, most of which were to be found in monastic libraries. He discusses the new schools and scholarly circles that were formed to promote the spread of Greek and Latin literature, especially philosophical works, and the emergence from them of the first humanistic libraries. He evokes the character of the libraries belonging to patrons of literature and the arts, such as Matthias Corvinus, the Vatican, the Medici family, the Dukes of Urbino and François I, among many others. Finally, there is an excellent treatise and circumstantial account of the invention of printing, which changed the scene as regards the dissemination of books and the formation of libraries in such a way that the world of books during the Renaissance witnessed a return to the state of affairs existing under the Roman emperors from Augustus to Hadrian.

Japoniæ insulæ: The Mapping of Japan

A Historical Introduction and Cartobibliography of European Printed Maps of Japan before 1800

Series:

Jason C. Hubbard

Japoniæ insulæ: The Mapping of Japan systematically categorizes and provides an overview of all the European printed maps of Japan published to 1800. The author has undertaken a review of the literature, conducted an exhaustive investigation in major libraries and private collections, analyzed these findings and then compiled information on 125 maps of Japan. The introduction contains information about the mapping to 1800, the typology of Japan by western cartographers, an overview on geographical names on early modern western maps of Japan and a presentation of the major cartographic models developed for this book.

In English with Japanese summary.