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Keukenhof: van Keukenduin tot Lentetuin

De wordingsgeschiedenis van Internationale Bloemententoonstelling Keukenhof

Maarten Timmer and Arie Dwarswaard

In 1949 one of the icons of the Dutch identity was founded in the western part of Holland: Keukenhof, nowadays known as the most beautiful spring garden in the world, famous worldwide for its beautiful landscaping with bulbflowers as its main focus.
This book describes the long and interesting history of this institution. Every possible aspect of this colourful history is scrutinously described, thus giving a balanced, complete and most interesting account. Many original illustrations and documents are illustrating this unique story, printed in full colour.
In Dutch, with English summaries.

Koeman's Atlantes Neerlandici. New Edition. Vol. IV A (2 Vols.)

The "Galérie agréable du monde" by Pieter van der Aa (1728)

Series:

Peter C.J. van der Krogt

This latest part of the Koeman's Atlantes Neerlandici series contains the description of one single "atlas" only: the Galérie agréable du monde, published by Pieter van der Aa in Leiden in 1728. The work is described page-by-page in the form of a catalogue. Every description is accompanied by a small photo. Large-format digital photographs of all the sheets – both textual and graphic – have been placed on the accompanying DVD, so that this volume is in effect a digital facsimile of the Galérie agréable.
In two volumes.

Mapping Greece, 1420-1800: A History

Maps in the Margarita Samourkas Collection

George Tolias

Mapping Greeceis a richly illustrated history of the cartography of Greece during the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, based on the Margarita Samourka Map Collection (one of the most important collections of its kind in private hands in Greece) that consists of 1,700 maps of Greece. Divided into five chapters, the book contains an introduction, conclusions, and an appendix.
Summarizing the foundations of the mapping of Greece as established by the classical and medieval cartographic tradition with the Ptolemaic revival, the maritime portolan chart, the mappa mundi, and the local cartography of early humanism, this book shows the rise and development of the regional concept of Greece and its establishment of cartographic conventions. Various chapters discuss the standardization of the regional maps of Greece in "the age of the atlas," an era of commercialization of the printed map, and the wide dissemination of these maps. Four prefaces written by George Tolias, Paschallis M. Kitromildes, Christos G. Zacharakis, and Margarita Samourkas discuss each one's thoughts on this ambitious and comprehensive project.
Also discussed is the application of modern surveying technology to the mapping of Greece, the work of astronomers and mariners, topographical commentaries, and the production of maps of ancient geography and historical maps of Greece from the end of the sixteenth century onwards. Richly illustrated in a large format, with an overwhelming number of beautiful maps illustrations, Mapping Greece contains a detailed catalogue of the maps in the Margarita Samourka collection compiled by Leonora Navari. The Margarita Samourka collection includes maps of all parts of Greece and of historical Greek regions. It is significant for its breadth and its chronological development beginning with Italian map engravers and publishers of the sixteenth century to the French reformation of cartography in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Finally, the book provides an overall summary of the series of definitions and perceptions of Greece which emerge in the maps of the region during the centuries of foreign domination, and an assessment of the contribution of maps of Greece to the general history of cartography.

Wiebe Hogendoorn

This book comprises a series of fifteen Amsterdam Schouwburg set prints from the eighteenth century, accompanied by detailed discussions. Most of these prints have appeared individually in Dutch theatre histories or specialist studies and some of them in foreign theatre histories. However, this is the first publication that includes the complete series, in colour and, what is more, explained from every point of view.
The series of prints in this book gradually came about after the Centenary of the Schouwburg in 1738. In this publication, they are supported by illustrations that can be connected to the set prints and are equally relevant when studying the theatre history of that time.
In cooperation with Ben Albach, Eric Alexander, Tuja van den Berg, Sietske de Jong-Schreuder, Hans de Leeuwe, Bianca M. du Mortier en Rob van der Zalm.

Hendrik D.L. Vervliet

In the course of the early sixteenth century the printed book decoration underwent a double metamorphosis. First stylistically, through the replacement of the previous medieval mostly floral embellishments by new motifs copied from Islamic or Byzantine sources, or borrowed from antiquity. Second technically, by the gradual inclusion of cast ornaments into the printer's bills-of-fount. They increasingly replaced the prestigious, sumptuous and time-consuming hand-painted illumination and decoration, or the less costly and sometimes crude woodcut techniques.
This survey focuses on one pattern of these Renaissance ornaments, namely the vine leaf, or as it is commonly known, the "Aldine" leaf. The design is also known as an ivy leaf or, as palaeographers and some typographers call it, a hedera or floral heart.
As a cast sort the vine leaf was introduced in the early sixteenth-century. It became rapidly one of the most favoured decorative designs in Renaissance typography and has remained a steadfast sort in a printer's case since then. The motif has mainly been studied from a designer's point of view, but a more bibliographically oriented survey seems to be missing. To fill up this void this survey aims to register all sixteenth-century sorts known.
Next to a facsimile in true scale, the bibliography contains the punchcutter's name, the size, occurrences, type-specimens, preserved artefacts and notes.

Women in Revolutionary Debate

Female Novelists from Burney to Austen

Stephanie Russo

In the later eighteenth and earlier nineteenth centuries novels were believed to have the power to shape and/or change behaviour, and, by implication, affect the political landscape of society on a large scale. The English response to the French Revolution can be traced through a reading of the novels of the period. The French Revolution in itself was indelibly associated with the domestic arena, and, thus, by extension, with women. Again and again in novels of the period, and particularly in women's novels, the stability, or otherwise, of the family reflects the stability of government and of the nation. It was through the medium of the novel that women could enter the debate on revolution, using their novels as means through which to explore many of the dominant social and political issues of the day.
The novel, more often than not set in the family home, was a medium uniquely suited to an exploration of revolutionary ideologies in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The emerging form of the novel offered a unique opportunity for women to present new, challenging perspectives on the revolutionary crisis of the 1790s. The works of Frances Burney, Charlotte Smith, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Robinson, Maria Edgeworth, Mrs Bullock and Jane Austen, all occupy an important place in this debate, and indeed, in the history of the novel. They demonstrate that women were at the forefront of development of the form of the novel itself.

Series:

Peter C.J. van der Krogt and Elger Heere

In the 16th, 17th and 18th century the Netherlands had a thriving map production and publishing industry. Johannes Blaeu and Abraham Ortelius are, among others, important names regarding the history of the Dutch cartographic industry. The maps produced in these three centruries are now relatively rare and highly sougth after by a large communicty of collectors, map curators, dealers of antiquities and enthusiasts. The series will give the reader clear, short, no-nonsense yet academically valid information about all Dutch atlas maps regarding a certain country or earea. e.g. England, Germany, France, etc. Each part will mainly address the edition of the atlas(es) in which the maps have been incorporated, the year of publication of the maps, the known states, cartographic references and remarks by the author.

This first volume of the Guides to Dutch Atlas Maps series offers a descriptive catalogue of all the maps of England, and particular parts of the country, published in Dutch atlases between 1570 and 1650. All the maps in the atlases of Ortelius, Mercator-Hondius, Janssonius, Blaeu and their followers are recorded.

Edited by Henk de Vries

One of the most famous highlights of the classic Spanish literature is the Tragicomedia de Calisto y Melibea by Fernando de Rojas. This tragicomedy, that became known as La Celestina, marks the end of medieval literature and the beginning of the literary renaissance in Spain.
This new Dutch translation by Henk de Vries offers an extensive analysis of the play.

Series:

Paul van den Brink

The main focus of attention in this study are the more than 3000 maps which were published by the Magazine (Tijdschrift) of the Royal Dutch Geographical Society (Koninklijk Nederlands Aardrijkskundig Genootschap) between 1873 and 1966. These have been divided into four periods, which are discussed in the elaborate introduction and which gives a complete overview of the history of the Society.
The wealth and variation of the cartographical material, which has been published in this leading magazine for almost a century, led worldwide to major interest among collectors and researchers. All maps are extensively described and have been made even more accessible by adding indices on name, area and subject.
In Dutch.