Browse results

Brabantia Ducatus

Geschiedenis en Cartobibliografie van het Hertogdom Brabant tot 1795

Series:

Mario Dorigo and Mathieu Franssen

Deze inventarisatie van de gedrukte kaarten van het hertogdom Brabant omvat alle kaarten die gepubliceerd zijn tussen 1536, wanneer voor het eerst een kaart van Brabant wordt vermeld, en 1795, toen het feodale hertogdom werd opgeheven. De cartobibliografie betreft uitsluitend gedrukte kaarten, zowel houtsneden als koperdiepdrukken. In vier introductiehoofdstukken worden achtereenvolgens de geschiedenis van het hertogdom, de cartografie van het hertogdom, de wijzingen in het kaartbeeld in de loop van de tijd en de ontwikkeling van de nauwkeurigheid van kaarten met behulp van het programma MapAnalyst beschreven.
De cartobibliografie bevat kaarten van het hele hertogdom, de vier kwartieren, het noorden en het zuiden en een viertal historische kaarten. Alle kaarttitels zijn volledig, aangevuld met een toelichting, de publicatiewijze en een lijst van vindplaatsen, met nadruk op Nederland en België.

This catalogue of printed maps of the Duchy of Brabant includes all the maps published between 1536, the date of the earliest mention of a map of Brabant, and 1795, when the feudal duchy was abolished. It includes woodcuts and intaglio prints. Four introductory chapters discribe the history of the duchy, the catrography of the duchy, the changes in the cartographic image over time and the evolution of the accuracy of the maps over time.
The cartobibliography contains maps of the entire duchy, maps of the four quarters, and maps of the north and south. All map titles are complete and supplemented with explanatory remarks, the manner of publication, and a list of locations where copies can be found, emphasizing the Netherlands and Belgium.
In Dutch, with an English summary.

Early Dutch Maritime Cartography

The North Holland School of Cartography (c. 1580-c. 1620)

Series:

Günter Schilder

Winner of the 2019 Menno Hertzberger Prize for Book History and Bibliography

This book is an exposition of an important, yet previously unknown chapter in the history of Dutch maritime cartography. While Amsterdam was developing into Europe’s most vital commercial hub in the seventeenth century, demanding and controlling the production of maps and sea-charts, a major School of Cartography was already flourishing in the so-called ‘Kop van Noord-Holland’ region just north of Amsterdam. This School specialised in the production of small-scale charts of larger areas, including the European coastlines and the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. Its masters used to call themselves ‘caert-schrijvers’ or ‘map-scribes’ when clarifying their profession. The cities of Enkhuizen and Edam were important trading ports and as such provided an ideal environment for developing into centres of cartography, serving sea-borne navigation.
Apart from the well-known printed pilot guides by Lucas Jansz Waghenaer, the output of these ‘caert-schrijvers’ consists mainly of manuscript charts on vellum. Copies, though few they are, nowadays can be found across the globe. Sea-charts provided invaluable on-board navigation assistance to ship captains. However, another surprising contemporaneous purpose for financing these charts become popular. Rich ship owners and merchants would commission new charts to serve as wall-decoration as well as a reference point for their maritime-related conversations. They feature a decorative lay-out filled with magnificent colours. Moreover, many of these charts are embellished with miniature paintings, certainly making them some of the most beautiful exemplars ever produced by Dutch cartography during its Golden Age.

Jan Moretus and the Continuation of the Plantin Press (2 Vols.)

A Bibliography of the Works published and printed by Jan Moretus I in Antwerp (1589-1610)

Series:

Dirk Imhof

Honourable Mention at 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography (2018)

The Plantin Press was one of the best known printing-publishing enterprises in the sixteenth century. In many ways, this bibliography builds and expands upon Leon Voet’s well-known publication The Plantin Press.
This bibliography of Jan Moretus I, Christopher Plantin's successor, documents the activities of the Plantin Press during the years 1589 till 1610. It contains descriptions of his own editions and other works printed by him. The extensive bibliography contains 704 descriptions of the Jan Moretus editions and lists over 500 announcements that he printed for the city of Antwerp.

Great Books on Horsemanship

Bibliotheca Hippologica Johan Dejager

Edited by Koert van der Horst

This lavishly illustrated encyclopedic reference work brings together and organizes virtually all the great works on horses published in the first two and a half centuries following the invention of printing. It covers over 350 rare books, acquired by the Belgian collector Johan Dejager, ranging from the late fifteenth to the early nineteenth century. A particular emphasis is placed on horsemanship, riding masters, veterinary science, and the cavalry. Biographical accounts of the 175 authors behind the books are included, as well as bibliographical descriptions of the original items. The book also offers a number of insightful essays. Thus, this unique volume invites readers to travel through the assorted historical documents as they collectively shed light onto the unparalleled importance, value, and beauty of the horse.

Series:

Ina Kok

Winner of the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography (2018)
Winner of the 2015 Menno Hertzberger Prize for Book History and Bibliography

The aims of this publication are twofold. In the first place it gives a complete census of the woodcuts in Dutch and Flemish incunabula, and a record of all places in which they appear. Both the book in which the woodcut (or series of woodcuts) appears for the first time and all repetitions of that woodcut before 1501 have been registered. In the second place a survey and analysis of the woodcuts used by each printer have been given. With this inventory dr. Kok has developed a very accurate dating system for incunabula. Over 3800 different illustrations have been found in the incunabula printed in the Low Countries, which illustrate the history of the use of woodcuts – the different states, the different stages of wear and tear.

This publication was made possible with the cooperation of many libraries and institutions worldwide:
Stichting Huis Bergh, 's-Heerenberg, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet, Antwerpen, Belgium (UNESCO Werelderfgoed); Ruusbroec-Genootschap, Antwerpen, Belgium; Erfgoedbibliotheek Hendrik Consience, Antwerpen, Belgium; Staatsbibliothek, Berlin, Germany; Bibliothèque Municipale, Besançon, France; Bibliothèque Royale Albert Ier, Bruxelles, Belgium; University Library, Cambridge, England; Universitätsbibliothek, Köln, Germany; Kongelige Biblioteket, Kopenhagen, Denmark; Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Darmstadt, Germany; Stadsarchief en Athenaeumbibliotheek, Deventer, Netherlands; Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland; Universitätsbibliothek, Frankfurt, Germany; Universitätsbibliothek, Freiburg, Germany; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Gent, Belgium; Niedersächsische Staats- und Unversitätsbibliothek, Göttingen, Germany; Librije, Gouda, Netherlands; Unversitätsbibliothek, Greifswald, Germany; Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands; Gemeente Archief, Haarlem, Netherlands; Stadsbibliotheek, Haarlem, Netherlands; Harvard College Library, Cambridge MA, USA; Houghton Library, Cambridge MA, USA; Friesch Genootschap, Leeuwarden, Netherlands; Erfgoed Leiden en omstreken, Leiden, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Leiden, Netherlands; Bibliothèque de l'Université, Liège, Belgium; British Library, London, England; Universitätsbibliothek, Lüneburg, Germany; Regionaal historisch centrum Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands; Draiflessen Collection (Liberna Collection), Mettingen, Germany; Koninklijk Zeeuwsch Genootschap der Wetenschappen, Middelburg, Netherlands; Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München, Germany; Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Münster, Germany; Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven CT, USA; Morgan Library, New York NY, USA; Bibliothek des Evangelischen Predigerseminars Wittenberg, Germany; Bodleian Library, Oxford, England; Bibliothèque Mazarine, Paris, France; Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, France; Huntington Library, San Marino CA, USA; Universitetsbibliothek, Stockholm, Sweden; Württembergische Landesbibliothek, Stuttgart, Germany; Royal Dutch Library, The Hague, Netherlands; Universitätsbibliothek, Trier, Germany; Universitetsbibliothek, Uppsala, Sweden; Rijksmuseum Catharijne Convent, Utrecht, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Utrecht, Netherlands; Bibliothèque Municipale, Valenciennes, France; Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection, Library of Congress, Washington DC, USA.

Series:

Edited by Lotte Hellinga

Since the appearance in 1908 of the first volume of BMC the work has been relied on as one of the main authorities on the earliest printing in Europe. Its coverage of early printing from the European countries in which the new technique was successively introduced provides not only extensive bibliographical descriptions, but introduces the material with an analysis of the development of printing in the relevant areas. This final volume to appear in the series covers England, where printing was not introduced until 1476, a good twenty years after the appearance of the earliest printed books in Mainz. The England volume of BMC responds to the special circumstances of early printing in England by giving particular attention to textual transmission, systematically following each text from source or copy to print whenever possible. Printing-house methods of book-production get full consideration. Notes on further dissemination are extended by an analysis of early ownership (and by implication of readership) taking account of material outside the British Library collection. This is followed by a history of the formation of the collection from 1753 in the British Museum, which began with the great collectors of the eighteenth century, and in which the antiquarian book-trade of this and later periods had an important role.
In view of the new focal points of interest the bibliographical descriptions are more elaborate than in the previous volumes, and include extensive notes on provenance and early readers which are the work of Margaret Nickson. A new forensic element is the systematic investigation of paper used by the printing houses until Caxton's death in 1492, when the nature of production changed. This was undertaken by Paul Needham, who contributes a separate introduction on the trade in paper and paper as evidence for dating and production processes. His investigation, together with the evidence of the use of printing types, underlies the new chronological arrangement which has to be the basis for any interpretation. The resulting chronological list of all printing in England before 1501 is presented in separate tables. The work includes descriptions of 323 copies of books, representing 221 editions of items printed in England, out of a total of 395 known to date, extensive introductions and 52 full-size plates accompanying the descriptions of printing types.

The Bookshop of the World

The Role of the Low Countries in the Book-Trade, 1473-1941

Edited by Lotte Hellinga, Alastair Duke, Jacob Harskamp and Theo Hermans

Proceedings of a Conference held in London, 15-17 september 1999, organized by The Association for Low Countries Studies, University College London, Centre for Dutch and Flemish Culture, The British Library, Dutch and Flemish section, Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine. Twenty-five papers by experts in their particular period or area were selected for publication. Covering almost five centuries, they represent a wholly modern approach to the history of the book and publishing in a European context, highlighting for the first time the crucial role of the Low Countries in transmitting the intellectual heritage of an area well beyond their own - changing - borders.

Edited by Lotte Hellinga and Wytze Hellinga

Valuable correspondence illustrating the birth of the modern method of incunabula studies, known as the Bradshaw-Proctor method.
I. The Corrrespondence 1864-1884 (100 Letters)
II. Commentary by W. & L. Hellinga