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Jan Moretus and the Continuation of the Plantin Press (2 Vols.)

A Bibliography of the Works published and printed by Jan Moretus I in Antwerp (1589-1610)

Series:

Dirk Imhof

Honourable Mention at 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography (2018)

The Plantin Press was one of the best known printing-publishing enterprises in the sixteenth century. In many ways, this bibliography builds and expands upon Leon Voet’s well-known publication The Plantin Press.
This bibliography of Jan Moretus I, Christopher Plantin's successor, documents the activities of the Plantin Press during the years 1589 till 1610. It contains descriptions of his own editions and other works printed by him. The extensive bibliography contains 704 descriptions of the Jan Moretus editions and lists over 500 announcements that he printed for the city of Antwerp.

Great Books on Horsemanship

Bibliotheca Hippologica Johan Dejager

Edited by Koert van der Horst

This lavishly illustrated encyclopedic reference work brings together and organizes virtually all the great works on horses published in the first two and a half centuries following the invention of printing. It covers over 350 rare books, acquired by the Belgian collector Johan Dejager, ranging from the late fifteenth to the early nineteenth century. A particular emphasis is placed on horsemanship, riding masters, veterinary science, and the cavalry. Biographical accounts of the 175 authors behind the books are included, as well as bibliographical descriptions of the original items. The book also offers a number of insightful essays. Thus, this unique volume invites readers to travel through the assorted historical documents as they collectively shed light onto the unparalleled importance, value, and beauty of the horse.

Series:

Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

This extensive index on all five volumes of The History of the Library in Western Civilization will identify all proper names, places and subjects covered in this comprehensive and scholarly series. Also, as one of the most definitive bibliographies on books about library history, it will list more than 6.000 entries.

Series:

Ina Kok

Winner of the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography (2018)
Winner of the 2015 Menno Hertzberger Prize for Book History and Bibliography

The aims of this publication are twofold. In the first place it gives a complete census of the woodcuts in Dutch and Flemish incunabula, and a record of all places in which they appear. Both the book in which the woodcut (or series of woodcuts) appears for the first time and all repetitions of that woodcut before 1501 have been registered. In the second place a survey and analysis of the woodcuts used by each printer have been given. With this inventory dr. Kok has developed a very accurate dating system for incunabula. Over 3800 different illustrations have been found in the incunabula printed in the Low Countries, which illustrate the history of the use of woodcuts – the different states, the different stages of wear and tear.

This publication was made possible with the cooperation of many libraries and institutions worldwide:
Stichting Huis Bergh, 's-Heerenberg, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet, Antwerpen, Belgium (UNESCO Werelderfgoed); Ruusbroec-Genootschap, Antwerpen, Belgium; Erfgoedbibliotheek Hendrik Consience, Antwerpen, Belgium; Staatsbibliothek, Berlin, Germany; Bibliothèque Municipale, Besançon, France; Bibliothèque Royale Albert Ier, Bruxelles, Belgium; University Library, Cambridge, England; Universitätsbibliothek, Köln, Germany; Kongelige Biblioteket, Kopenhagen, Denmark; Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Darmstadt, Germany; Stadsarchief en Athenaeumbibliotheek, Deventer, Netherlands; Royal Observatory, Edinburgh, Scotland; Universitätsbibliothek, Frankfurt, Germany; Universitätsbibliothek, Freiburg, Germany; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Gent, Belgium; Niedersächsische Staats- und Unversitätsbibliothek, Göttingen, Germany; Librije, Gouda, Netherlands; Unversitätsbibliothek, Greifswald, Germany; Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands; Gemeente Archief, Haarlem, Netherlands; Stadsbibliotheek, Haarlem, Netherlands; Harvard College Library, Cambridge MA, USA; Houghton Library, Cambridge MA, USA; Friesch Genootschap, Leeuwarden, Netherlands; Erfgoed Leiden en omstreken, Leiden, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Leiden, Netherlands; Bibliothèque de l'Université, Liège, Belgium; British Library, London, England; Universitätsbibliothek, Lüneburg, Germany; Regionaal historisch centrum Limburg, Maastricht, Netherlands; Draiflessen Collection (Liberna Collection), Mettingen, Germany; Koninklijk Zeeuwsch Genootschap der Wetenschappen, Middelburg, Netherlands; Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München, Germany; Universitäts- und Landesbibliothek, Münster, Germany; Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven CT, USA; Morgan Library, New York NY, USA; Bibliothek des Evangelischen Predigerseminars Wittenberg, Germany; Bodleian Library, Oxford, England; Bibliothèque Mazarine, Paris, France; Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, France; Huntington Library, San Marino CA, USA; Universitetsbibliothek, Stockholm, Sweden; Württembergische Landesbibliothek, Stuttgart, Germany; Royal Dutch Library, The Hague, Netherlands; Universitätsbibliothek, Trier, Germany; Universitetsbibliothek, Uppsala, Sweden; Rijksmuseum Catharijne Convent, Utrecht, Netherlands; Universiteitsbibliotheek, Utrecht, Netherlands; Bibliothèque Municipale, Valenciennes, France; Lessing J. Rosenwald Collection, Library of Congress, Washington DC, USA.

Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

This examines the papyrus books collected by Plato himself, a habit which began when he was still 'studying' under Socrates and continued throughout his years of teaching in the Academy. The book deals extensively with the works of the Ionian and Eleatic Natural Philosophers, as well as of the Pyhagoreans, which informed the composition of Plato's Dialogues. Furthermore, through this process the fabric of Sophistic literature composed at Athens is unfolded and the pioneers who introduced the study of Mathematics in the Academy are discussed in brief. Finally, a large chapter in the book deals with the architecture of the Academy, including topographical surveys and scale plans which reveal interesting facts about the ideas that went into its design, and the use of its facilities.

Ryan Twomey

'The Child is Father of the Man'discusses the field of nineteenth-century Juvenilia. Specifically, the development of the child writer into the adult author, arguing for increased critical attention toward the early works of now famous writers.
The introductory chapter reviews the role of juvenilia in the writing progression of famous authors and provides a discussion of current academic scholarship in the field of juvenilia. The book then focuses on the individual literary progressions of the nineteenth-century British writers William Harrison Ainsworth, Emily Brontë, and George Eliot, and the Anglo-Irish writer, Maria Edgeworth. The analysis in each chapter has been contextualised within the historical, regional, gothic and lyric modes, and includes an interdisciplinary study in the fields of history, biography, and languages and linguistics. Each chapter is provided as an individual case study espousing the importance of the juvenilia on the development of the later, more publicised, authorship. The concluding chapter discusses the future of the genre with reference to the discoveries outlined in the text, and juxtaposes these findings with the perceived neglect juvenilia has received from the academic community.

The History of the Library in Western Civilization, Volume V

From Petrarch to Michelangelo: The Revival of the Study of the Classics and the First Humanistic Libraries Printing in the Service of the World of Books and Monumental Libraries

Series:

Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

In this fifth volume, the author writes about the re-evaluation of the ancient world: this set in motion a quest for the surviving works of ancient Greek and Latin literature, most of which were to be found in monastic libraries. He discusses the new schools and scholarly circles that were formed to promote the spread of Greek and Latin literature, especially philosophical works, and the emergence from them of the first humanistic libraries. He evokes the character of the libraries belonging to patrons of literature and the arts, such as Matthias Corvinus, the Vatican, the Medici family, the Dukes of Urbino and François I, among many others. Finally, there is an excellent treatise and circumstantial account of the invention of printing, which changed the scene as regards the dissemination of books and the formation of libraries in such a way that the world of books during the Renaissance witnessed a return to the state of affairs existing under the Roman emperors from Augustus to Hadrian.

Hendrik D.L. Vervliet

In the course of the early sixteenth century the printed book decoration underwent a double metamorphosis. First stylistically, through the replacement of the previous medieval mostly floral embellishments by new motifs copied from Islamic or Byzantine sources, or borrowed from antiquity. Second technically, by the gradual inclusion of cast ornaments into the printer's bills-of-fount. They increasingly replaced the prestigious, sumptuous and time-consuming hand-painted illumination and decoration, or the less costly and sometimes crude woodcut techniques.
This survey focuses on one pattern of these Renaissance ornaments, namely the vine leaf, or as it is commonly known, the "Aldine" leaf. The design is also known as an ivy leaf or, as palaeographers and some typographers call it, a hedera or floral heart.
As a cast sort the vine leaf was introduced in the early sixteenth-century. It became rapidly one of the most favoured decorative designs in Renaissance typography and has remained a steadfast sort in a printer's case since then. The motif has mainly been studied from a designer's point of view, but a more bibliographically oriented survey seems to be missing. To fill up this void this survey aims to register all sixteenth-century sorts known.
Next to a facsimile in true scale, the bibliography contains the punchcutter's name, the size, occurrences, type-specimens, preserved artefacts and notes.

Women in Revolutionary Debate

Female Novelists from Burney to Austen

Stephanie Russo

In the later eighteenth and earlier nineteenth centuries novels were believed to have the power to shape and/or change behaviour, and, by implication, affect the political landscape of society on a large scale. The English response to the French Revolution can be traced through a reading of the novels of the period. The French Revolution in itself was indelibly associated with the domestic arena, and, thus, by extension, with women. Again and again in novels of the period, and particularly in women's novels, the stability, or otherwise, of the family reflects the stability of government and of the nation. It was through the medium of the novel that women could enter the debate on revolution, using their novels as means through which to explore many of the dominant social and political issues of the day.
The novel, more often than not set in the family home, was a medium uniquely suited to an exploration of revolutionary ideologies in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The emerging form of the novel offered a unique opportunity for women to present new, challenging perspectives on the revolutionary crisis of the 1790s. The works of Frances Burney, Charlotte Smith, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Robinson, Maria Edgeworth, Mrs Bullock and Jane Austen, all occupy an important place in this debate, and indeed, in the history of the novel. They demonstrate that women were at the forefront of development of the form of the novel itself.

The History of the Library in Western Civilization, Volume IV

From Cassiodorus to Furnival: Classical and Christian Letters, Schools and Libraries in the Monasteries and Universities, Western Book Centres

Series:

Konstantinos Sp. Staikos

This work is the fourth part in an important, five-volume series addressing the unique role libraries have played in building and preserving Western culture. Mr. Staikos has become one of our foremost scholars on library history, writing such books as this as well as works like "The Great Libraries," a classic in its field.
This fourth volume discusses the publishing procedure for secular and religious writings of late antiquity and the factors that led to the impoverishment of the monumental libraries in Rome. New centers of learning grew up in the monasteries, where great libraries containing educational and instructive books and representative works of Christian literature came into being. Monastic libraries were founded throughout Europe, including the regions with Celtic and Anglo-Saxon populations: those at Monte Cassino, Bobbio, St. Gallen, Fulda, Cluny and elsewhere are dealt with extensively. Mention is also made of the libraries founded in universities and of the new philosophy of forming school libraries, as in Bologna and Paris.