Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 39 items for :

  • Social Justice x
  • Education Policy & Politics x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Primary Language: English x
  • Search level: Titles x
Clear All
Volume Editors: Rosemary Sage and Riccarda Matteucci
Education was established to create employees for 19th and 20th century manufacturing models. The 21st century requires a rethink. Change is happening fast, with jobs not guaranteed as robots are taking over routines. We must prepare students for uncertainty & higher-level employment – helping them think and communicate instead of retain and recall facts for passing exams. Some curricula is either irrelevant for today or gained at the press of a button. Listening and literate talk (narratives) for collaboratively solving real problems should be the focus, not facts forgotten after tests. The book explores this important debate.

Contributors are: Daryle Abrahams, Nigel Adams, Peter Chatterton, Stefano Cobello, Joanna Ebner, Pierre Frath, Irene Glendinning, Susan James, Riccarda Matteucci, Gloria McGregor, Elena Milli, Elizabeth Negus, Juan Eduardo Romero, Rosemary Sage and Emma Webster.
This volume provides an exciting introduction to social wellbeing and different epistemological standpoints. Targeted at researchers, students, academics, policy makers, practitioners and activists, the volume allows stakeholders to collectively problematise and address marginalised populations’ social wellbeing, providing perspectives and applications from various disciplines such as education, health, public policy and social welfare. Chapters continue to debate social wellbeing within their disciplines, and challenges practitioners’ and researchers’ experience, particularly interactions between individual and social aspects of wellbeing. Contributors provide practical and academic discussions, drawing upon different cultural, historical, political and social paradigms, putting forward available empirical data.

Contributors are: Andrew Azzopardi, Amanda Bezzina, Trevor Calafato, Joanne Cassar, Marlene Cauchi, Carmel Cefai, Marilyn Clark, Maureen Cole, Katya De Giovanni, Melanie E. Demarco, Andreana Dibben, Ruth Falzon, Marvin Formosa, Natalie Kenely, Dione Mifsud, Brenda Murphy, Claudia Psaila, Sandra Scicluna, Anabel Scolaro, Miriam Teuma, Anna Maria Vella, Sue Vella and Carla Willing,
Author: Amy L. Kelly
High-stakes standardized testing has a long history of exclusion, oppression, power, and control with deep roots in the landscape of American education. In this text, the events and circumstances that have forged the way of high-stakes testing are presented in a straightforward and accessible manner.

This history is essential to understanding our current realities of testing in the United States especially as they relate to marginalization and control of certain populations. Furthermore, a historical perspective provides a lens to consider high-stakes standardized testing critically; to unpack the purposes, benefits, and damages of this practice.
Volume Editor: Alpesh Maisuria
This encyclopaedia showcases the explanatory power of Marxist educational theory and practice. The entries have been written by 51 leading authors from across the globe. The 39 entries cover an impressive range of contemporary issues and historical problematics. The editor has designed the book to appeal to readers within the Marxism and education intellectual tradition, and also those who are curious newcomers, as well as critics of Marxism.

The Encyclopaedia of Marxism and Education is the first of its kind. It is a landmark text with relevance for years to come for the productive dialogue between Marxism and education for transformational thinking and practice.
This volume offers a Naming praxis with which teachers might more closely align with their ethical ideals in the midst of their daily practice and relationships with students. Framed ontologically in Maxine Greene’s existential-phenomenological notion of Becoming, the author explicates Greene’s Naming as a praxis within her own early teaching experiences through the interpretive methods of currere and teacher lore. This study evolves in epistolary conversation with Maxine Greene, teacher colleagues, and new teachers. It demonstrates the possibilities of applying critical reflective and discursive dialogue to the tensions of a teacher’s life of practice in order to identify the obstacles to and the opportunities of the Becoming of the teacher and the student(s) in the educational encounter.
The COVID-19 pandemic interrupted a chaotic political and social landscape within the United States. Its arrival revealed cracks in longstanding neoliberal narratives. In this book, the authors utilize critical theory to analyze the collapse of these hyper-individualistic narratives within the media, in the broad areas of economics, the nuclear family, and authoritarian populism and through the topics of scapegoating China, capitalist class economic messaging, the essential worker, the family under shutdown, the spread of conspiracy theories, and the ideologies of the COVID-19 protests. The book conclude with commentary on the significance of the George Floyd protests and their connection to the pandemic.
International Perspectives on Knowledge Democracy
Is the university contributing to our global crises or does it offer stories of hope? Much recent debate about higher education has focussed upon rankings, quality, financing and student mobility. The COVID-19 pandemic, the climate crisis, the calls for decolonisation, the persistence of gender violence, the rise of authoritarian nationalism, and the challenge of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals have taken on new urgency and given rise to larger questions about the social relevance of higher education. In this new era of uncertainty, and perhaps opportunity, higher education institutions can play a vital role in a great transition or civilisational shift to a newly imagined world.

Socially Responsible Higher Education: International Perspectives on Knowledge Democracy shares the experiences of a broadly representative and globally dispersed set of writers on higher education and social responsibility, broadening perspectives on the democratisation of knowledge. The editors have deliberately sought examples and viewpoints from parts of the world that are seldom heard in the international literature. Importantly, they have intentionally chosen to achieve a gender and diversity balance among the contributors. The stories in this book call us to take back the right to imagine, and ‘reclaim’ the public purposes of higher education.
Watch the Promotional Trailer Here! Within today’s rapidly shifting racial demographics, knowing who to trust can be risky. Family History in Black and White: A Novel traces two competitors for the prestigious position of school superintendent. One is white and one is black; both are urban high school principals. Ben, who had been bullied as a child, craves public recognition but, unsure whether he can trust today’s competitive process to be fair to a white man, wrestles with compromising his own integrity to get what he wants. Roxane, who has navigated racism all her life, craves recognition of her humanity, but can’t be sure which of the professionals around her are actually trustworthy, including her chief competitor, Ben. In the end, both must ultimately reckon with the reverberations of a surprising twist in their histories.
How can African philosophy of education contribute to contemporary debates in the context of complexities, dilemmas and uncertainties in African higher education? The capacity for self-reflection, self-evaluation and self-criticism enables African philosophy of higher education to examine and re-examine itself in the context of current issues in African higher education. The reflective capacity is in line with the Socratic dictum ‘know thy self.’ African Higher Education in the 21st Century: Epistemological, Ontological and Ethical Perspectives responds to the demands for reflection and self-knowledge by drawing from ontology, epistemology and ethics in an attempt to address issues that affect African higher education as they connect with the past, present and future.
Volume Editors: Jane A. Van Galen and Jaye Sablan
The contributors to Amplified Voices, Intersecting Identities: First-Gen PhDs Navigating Institutional Power overcame deeply unequal educational systems to become the first in their families to finish college. Now, they are among the 3% of first-generation undergraduate students to go on to graduate school, in spite of structural barriers that worked against them.

These scholars write of socialization to the professoriate through the complex lens of intersectional identities of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social class.

These first-generation graduate students have crafted critical narratives of the structural obstacles within higher education that stand in the way of brilliant scholars who are poor and working-class, Black, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian, immigrant, queer, white, and women. They write of agency in creating defiant networks of support, of sustaining connections to family and communities, of their activism and advocacy on campus. They refuse to perpetuate the myths of meritocracy that reproduce the inequalities of higher education. In response to research literature and to campus programming that frames their identities around “need”, they write instead of agentive and politicized intersectional identities as first-generation graduate students, committed to institutional change through their research, teaching, and service.

Contributors are: Lamesha C. Brown, LaToya Brown, Altheria Caldera, Araceli Calderón, Marisa V. Cervantes, Joy Cobb, Raven K. Cokley, Francine R. Coston, Angela Gay, Josué R. López, Rebecca Morgan, Gloria A. Negrete-Lopez, Lisa S. Palacios, Takeshia Pierre, Alejandra I. Ramírez, Matt Reid, Ebony Russ, Jaye Sablan, Travis Smith, Phitsamay S. Uy, Jane A. Van Galen, Jason K. Wallace and Lin Wu.