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A Memorial in the World offers a new appraisal of the reception and role of Constantine the Great and Ardashir I (the founder of the Sasanian Empire c.224-651), in their respective cultural spheres. Concentrating on marked parallels in the legendary material attached to both men it argues that the memories of both were reshaped by processes referencing the same deep literary heritage.

What is more, as “founders” of imperial systems that identified with a particular religious community, the literature that developed around these late antique figures applied these ancient tropes in a startlingly parallel direction. This parallel offers a new angle on the Kārnāmag tradition, an originally Middle Persian biographical tradition of Ardashir I.
Author: Pia Wiegmink
Abolitionist Cosmopolitanism redefines the potential of American antislavery literature as a cultural and political imaginary by situating antislavery literature in specific transnational contexts and highlighting the role of women as producers, subjects, and audiences of antislavery literature. Pia Wiegmink draws attention to locales, authors, and webs of entanglement between texts, ideas, and people. Perceived through the lens of gender and transnationalism, American antislavery literature emerges as a body of writing that presents profoundly reconfigured literary imaginations of freedom and equality in the United States prior to the Civil War.
A History of the Waterway North of Eurasia
Volume Editors: Jens Petter Nielsen and Edwin Okhuizen
The notion of a waterway north of Eurasia, conceived in the first half of the sixteenth century, remained only a dream for centuries, due to ice, unmapped coastlines and a lack of geographical knowledge. This volume is the first comprehensive, scholarly account in English of the slow but steady exploration and commercial exploitation of the Siberian coastal waters, and it proves that this was a truly international endeavour. However, in the end, the Northern Sea Route as a through traverse route came to be used primarily by the Soviet Union, for which it became a crucial vehicle for the geopolitical and economic integration of its vast territories. As an international trade route the Northern Sea Route is only today about to win its way, essentially as a result of global warming. This being the case, should we rejoice or despair?